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Old 05-01-2009, 05:25 PM   #1 (permalink)
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May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, so we thought we'd get share some advice on safe riding.

Motorcyclists know how much skill is required in riding. You have to be aware of your bike, the road, the traffic around you, and most importantly, yourself, when you get behind the handlebars.

But even the safest, most experienced riders can still make mistakes. That’s why we’re presenting a series of articles on motorcycle safety, because you can never be too safe.

Rider Education, Injuries and Fatalities
Time for a reality check
Whether you have decades of experience or are a newbie, it pays to realistically size up this activity called "riding a motorcycle," and to look at yourself as a lifelong learner.
Insurance Basics
How much coverage do you need?
Are you and your motorcycle insured well enough to satisfy your state's legal guidelines, as well as your own risk tolerance? You owe it to yourself and those who care about you to be sure you are up to date.
The Truth about Drinking and Riding
Some sobering statistics on a dangerous problem
While no one will publicly declare alcohol consumption and motorcycling are OK, there remain definite problems in a culture offering mixed messages.

More: Rider Safety articles on Motorcycle.com
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Old 06-01-2009, 03:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I took the msf course last weekend and passed my texas motorcyce license test last week. I'm a new rider with 1200 miles on my new bike, and did exactly what this article recommended. I took my bike out to a remote area and practiced cornering and hard braking before I even started riding out in traffic. I'm a very defensive driver and am suspicious of every car I encounter out on the road. I enjoy riding alot and am not so cautious that I can't have fun, but I do not want to become relaxed to the point of being careless.
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Old 02-07-2010, 06:49 AM   #3 (permalink)
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You have to be suspicious of everyone. I had a dodge neon backup into me, push me downhill 20ft, and my little ninja 250 took all of the damage. This kid was up all night drinking.
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Old 09-02-2010, 12:59 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Taking the MSF course was the best thing I had done. I have been riding for about 18 years but found that I had developed so many bad habits that were pretty unsafe. Covering the brakes was one of them. I read a post from someone on this forum recently about the danger of that when they hit a bump while covering the rear brake and almost went down.
Also, never bad to be cautious as long as it doesn't become all you think about.
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Old 09-05-2010, 11:19 AM   #5 (permalink)
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junk that halogen and fit a HID (about $50 from ebay now per set) - drivers definately see you easier (remember to drop the aim so it doesn't dazzle)

and above all remember - every car driver sets out to kill you, they will do whatever it takes to get you and make up any excuse to get off with it - don't let them suceed in their mission.
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Old 12-25-2010, 01:07 AM   #6 (permalink)
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1. Make eye contact
Never assume others see you. Always try to make eye contact with drivers who may be about to pull into your path.

2. Read “vehicle language”
Even when drivers, cyclists and pedestrians do see you approaching, they often misjudge your distance and speed. Don’t rely on them.

3. Watch out for left-turning vehicles at intersections
Getting hit by an oncoming vehicle that’s turning left is the most common type of motorcycle crash.

4. Check behind when turning left from a highway
Watch your mirrors and make sure you have plenty of space behind. The drivers behind might not slow down for you.

5. Look out for hazardous road condition
Wet roads, fluid spills, sand, gravel, highway sealant, railroad tracks, potholes and other road-surface hazards reduce your traction. They cause many falls.

6. Take it easy on the curves
Many crashes happen there. You might overshoot the road or cross the centre line and get hit by oncoming traffic. Watch the road ahead, slow down and choose the correct lane position-before entering a

7. Wear a good helmet
Helmets prevent head injuries in 67 per cent of crashes and deaths in 29 per cent. Make sure your helmet has a sticker showing that it meets current safety standards. Avoid buying a used helmet. It may have been in a crash, and the damage may not be obvious.

8. Wear protective clothing designed for motorcycle riders
It can provide some protection during a crash, as well as shield you from the weather and flying debris. Keeping warm and dry will help you stay alert and maintain coordination. Wear your riding gear in layers so you can adjust to changing conditions. Jeans give little protection. Never ride in lightweight pants or shorts.

9. Protect your eyes and face
Constant wind can make your eyes water, preventing you from spotting hazards. Flying insects, dust and debris can hurt your eyes and face. The best protection is a full-face helmet with a built-in face shield.

10. Be visible
Wear bright, reflective clothing. Add extra reflective material to it or wear a reflective vest. Likewise, buy a bright-coloured helmet and stick reflective tape to the back and sides. Always keep your headlight on. Ride in the lane position where other drivers can easily see you and you’ve got room to move. Avoid all other vehicles’ blind spots.


These are most important tips.
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:50 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhinopolis View Post
I took the msf course last weekend and passed my texas motorcyce license test last week. I'm a new rider with 1200 miles on my new bike, and did exactly what this article recommended. I took my bike out to a remote area and practiced cornering and hard braking before I even started riding out in traffic. I'm a very defensive driver and am suspicious of every car I encounter out on the road. I enjoy riding alot and am not so cautious that I can't have fun, but I do not want to become relaxed to the point of being careless.

as a new driver its easy to pay attention to all that stuff, but over time youll become complacent to a lot of things .
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Old 04-03-2011, 03:39 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 98Ninja6 View Post
junk that halogen and fit a HID (about $50 from ebay now per set) - drivers definately see you easier (remember to drop the aim so it doesn't dazzle)

and above all remember - every car driver sets out to kill you, they will do whatever it takes to get you and make up any excuse to get off with it - don't let them suceed in their mission.
HIDs are illegal in when put into a reflector meant for halogens, along as you dont drive at night you would be fine...but if you do your still going to be blinding drivers.
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