Ocean rust damage + CANT UNLOCK GAS TANK! - Page 2 - KawiForums - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 05:10 AM
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There are specialist lubricants for locks, or in a pinch use a penetrating and easing oil such as '3 in 1'. WD40 might do the job but isn't really the best thing to use.

ACF 50 helps to protect against rust. Apply it from new. A cover is a big help if you don't have a garage, but get one that's breathable (expensive) and don't cover a wet bike.

Use plenty of good quality wax polish on paintwork and polished surfaces.

Once rust has got a grip though, you'll never get rid of it, but Ku-rust or similar products can help a lot.

Rob
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 08:03 AM
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Yeah, but the parts of the bike that are particularly bad I wouldn't want to paint over. The adjuster in the first picture would look weird if it was painted a matte black. It's supposed to be metallic. And that's true for pretty much all of the parts I'm having trouble with excep the odd nut or bolt that I don't mind. I might consider painting those with black rustoleum though. I had to do that with my kickstand right when I bought the bike because it was missing paint right when i got it from the dealership.

I'll definitely look into the buffer though. If nothing else, I won't have to look at that HIDEOUS, rusted-over adjuster every time I mount my bike.
Your levers you can pull them off and put your adjustment knob to a buffing wheel and about 20 seconds later you will be back to shiny and new, I wouldnt paint that either, I would only paint the hard to get to stuff. The buffer will also take out all of that oxidation on your levers and anywhere else on the bike. after you get it shined the biggest part is keeping it shined so you dont have to dissemble and buff again.

The old people seem to be worse than the teens texting, I say once your 60: driving test every year.
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 02:38 PM
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If you're still stuck with the lock on the cap, I assume you'll have WD40 lying around somewhere. Spray a load of that in and move the key in and out of the lock a few times to work it in. Let it soak in for an hour or something, then when you try to unlock it make sure you press down on the cap before you turn the key. This will take the pressure of the bolts and locking mechanism.

If it doesn't work, spray more WD40 in there and try again later.
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 03:21 PM
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Rustcure 3000 worked perfectly when I had the problem with my gascap.

As far as the rest of the rust... well you've already buffed off the clearcoat that prevents the problem, the more you clean it the worse it's going to get. Your best bet is going to be either replacing the parts or spraying a thin film of WD40 on the affected parts every couple of days. The oil in the WD will keep the rust from forming for a couple of days. Reapply as necessary.

Of course I'm generalizing from a single example here, but everyone does that. At least I do.


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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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I've been reading that WD40 isn't the ideal long-term solution to the gas cap issue because it can gunk up your keyhole. I expect the dry graphite lube to work just fine.

I'm definitely picking up that buffer, and I'm also going to buy some ACF 50. Sounds like a really solid product.

And I think you're right about the adjuster: now that it's missing clear coat it'll keep rusting up every few days, and I don't want to have to spray it with WD40 every day. How easy is it to replace that part? I've removed the left lever assembly before and replaced the lever itself (ball tip broke off) but I don't remember seeing a way to remove and replace the adjuster. Is that something that has to be done by a professional?
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post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 04:09 PM
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Should be able to get a new lever for less than $50... replacing the adjuster isn't really an option.

I'd just WD40 it myself every couple of days, quick spray down.

I've heard of people in the UK heating vasoline carefully on the stove until it's hot enough to melt into a liquid, then you brush it carefully onto any exposed section of metal that can rust. It'll look like ass as stuff sticks to it, but it'll stop the rust... seems pretty desperate to me though.

Of course I'm generalizing from a single example here, but everyone does that. At least I do.


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post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-26-2012, 05:55 PM
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I've had the same problem with my '09 gas tank lock. Started to acquire a white residue around it and then one day I couldn't get it to open at all. I used some chain lube to initially get it working, but within 2 months it was locked up tight again. Thats when I used some "Break Free" CLP. Its a weapons cleaner/lubricant/protector.All it took was a couple drops and I had the lock working in less then 30 seconds. Havent had the slightest problems since. You can pick up a bottle for about $5 and any firearms retailer.
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post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-26-2012, 06:38 PM
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This might be better than WD-40 for preventing rust on surfaces:

AMSOIL - MP Heavy Duty Metal Protector (AMH)


This costs more but might be even better, or the aircraft products mentioned in the article:

RejeX - webBikeWorld

“Do…not waste time protesting the self-inflated showmen and bloviating bullshitters who populate our culture. It’s more fun to marvel at them, to appreciate them, to be grateful for them, and to mock them relentlessly. ”-from the 2010 book American Freak Show by Willie Geist. "He wondered what difference any of it would make two hundred years from now." -from the book Cyclops by Clive Cussler.
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post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-29-2012, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
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I've heard of people in the UK heating vasoline carefully on the stove until it's hot enough to melt into a liquid, then you brush it carefully onto any exposed section of metal that can rust. It'll look like ass as stuff sticks to it, but it'll stop the rust... seems pretty desperate to me though.
After over 40 years and 750,000 miles, and over 40 UK Winters, I've never had to resort to anything like that.

Alloy parts are best paint stripped to remove the protective lacquer. Naked alloy only needs a wipe with a damp cloth to keep it clean and shiny. The lacquer gets chipped and corrosion starts to spread underneath it where it can't be wiped or polished off. That's why I remove it.

Chrome and paint just need to be kept clean. A good quality wax polish is better than anything else on paint, and pretty good on chrome. Otherwise, ACF 50 for chrome, and for any bare metal. WD40 is ineffective. It's meant for electrical parts, not general protection or lubrication. By driving of moisture it can actually increase visible salt deposits, but out of solution the salt is less corrosive.

Don't use any heavy oil or grease on locks. It gums up the mechanism. WD-40 if you have nothing else to get one working, but 3 in 1 or a specialist product is better. Lock lube or a similar specialist lock product is best for keeping the lock operating. That's for the actual lock mechanism. Latches, cables, etc operated by the lock are best lubed with a light machine oil.

The problem with many bikes is that moisture can get inside frame and swinging arm tubes, which aren't protected. ACF 50 sprayed inside is the long term answer here.

Rob
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post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-08-2012, 05:06 PM Thread Starter
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I got ACF 50 and am about to start putting it to use. However, I bought some graphite powder lubricant and it seemed to have had no effect on the lock. I then tried WD-40 out of desperation and that didn't work either. Am I out of options now other than having to get it fixed professionally?
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