"Respecting" your bike. - Page 4 - KawiForums - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums
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post #31 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-08-2011, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by slev View Post
It doesn't really feel like it can handle anything you throw at it, and that is a good deterrent for the rider to NOT attempt it until they are ready to do so. I thought my 250 was quite the pig, until I got more experience under my belt, and learned how to use it.
If I'm reading this correctly, are you suggesting the 250 doesn't feel as capable which helps to allow a new rider to approach it with more hesitance until they improve their skills?

Having 10 years of experience on a 748 and about 2 on a '98 ZX6R I found the ('08) 250R plenty capable. Not in outright acceleration of course but the bike scoots off the line well enough where it could catch a newbie out, depending on where they were shifting. The biggest surprise was how agile the bike was in the twisties! I found the bike very confidence inspiring and after a short period to adjust to the turning differences and tires I found I could really push the bike in the corners. All the time spent on a bigger bike and here I was going faster on a 250. That ride was a big eye opener and I have much respect for the 250 now, just no room to add one to the stable. At the moment.
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post #32 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-08-2011, 01:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DUC748inMD View Post
If I'm reading this correctly, are you suggesting the 250 doesn't feel as capable which helps to allow a new rider to approach it with more hesitance until they improve their skills?
If it's the first bike you ride - potentially. That's how it was for me, anyways. The lack of speed, spongy suspension, and the teeny tires didn't instill much trust in it initially. Building my skill-set and understanding what the bike could do and not do were what made me realize how solid of a bike it actually is. After some more seat time (and on my other bikes), I like and respect () my 250 a lot more.

It's nice to be good enough to "earn" the speed you're going, not just slump around a corner like a fool, and open the throttle up to get there.

It's great.


.: Titanium 2005 636 .:. Orange 2009 ZX6R (stolen) .:. Black 2015 Z1000 :.
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post #33 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-08-2011, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by DUC748inMD View Post
Some of you have touched on this but since I was composing out of the browserÖyou get it anway.

Can you respect that which you donít know or understand? A lot of new riders base a purchase off the cosmetic or what their friends are seen riding. At that point it may be all they know. Once that takes root itís tough to talk someone out of a purchase. And out of potential trouble. Individuals do vary though.

One thing that can go a bit farther than respecting the ride is having good, level headed knowledgeable friends to help guide you in those early years of ridingÖsomeone to watch, follow and learn from which will in turn teach you more about the machine youíre on. Respect will come with understanding.

Can because not everyone will have that available to them. I should have been talked out of my first bike. I have a friend with nearly 40 years of riding experience that helped me realize my interest in bikes. Instead the flames were fanned and the purchase rationalized and we both walked away with new Ducatiís. I expected him to take on a mentor like roll in my riding but that didnít materialize, though I also never asked for it which was my fault.

I do believe people can ride a bigger bike as a first bike but I would never encourage it. Slowing the pace helps you focus on correct technique and form. The slower acceleration of the 250 isnít panic inducing like whacking the throttle on the 748 at the wrong moment, same with the suspension and overall behavior of the bike. If my brother in law had gone with a 600, instead of the 250R that he finally bought, I would still be here to help guide him along and teach him how to go about riding it safely. I feel it would take a fair bit longer though. Iíve already given him a copy of Codeís Twist of the Wrist II DVD and have told him to pick up the book as well. Iíve spent time with him verbalizing scenarios that could be encountered and some of the likely reactions and consequences. Iíve gone with him to correctly size helmets and weíll be looking to try on (leather) jackets and pants at the IMS in January. He has quality motorcycle boots and good gloves.

Heís got a great bike to start on, heís on his way to fully suiting up, he has a good attitude towards learning and Iíll be here each step of the way helping to speed along his skill set. Itís going to be a fun journey.
Great post man! I agree with ya, your brother in law is lucky to have you around.

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post #34 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-08-2011, 02:28 PM
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It's nice to be good enough to "earn" the speed you're going, not just slump around a corner like a fool, and open the throttle up to get there.

It's great.
Correct, and that is why the 250 is such a good beginner bike. It teaches you how to maintain that momentum via correct cornering vs. wheel chair in and rocket out. What fun is that?

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Great post man! I agree with ya, your brother in law is lucky to have you around.
Thanks. I'm just trying to do what I wish someone had done with me. But...I'd be in a different boat right now so who knows. My wife wants me to sell the Ducati because of how uncomfortable I find it but I still can't let go of how fun it is to ride...so long as you aren't putting around of course.
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post #35 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-30-2011, 03:26 AM
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Nice post real talk on both ends. You need the knowledge and respect. Experience is something lived so be real with yourself and your bike will thank you. situations do come and it's your reaction that counts in every situation... Happy Riding ya'll
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post #36 of 153 (permalink) Old 12-30-2011, 12:46 PM
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This is very useful for new riders and the ones that think that know it all people should really think every time before getting on these machines because people DIE. ride safe and don`t be fooled by faster riders than you to exceed your limits. The day will come after a lot of practice when you will be faster and better.
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post #37 of 153 (permalink) Old 02-06-2012, 07:03 PM
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Its all about respect, not fear.
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post #38 of 153 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 03:47 PM
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Im new to a bike on the road but grew up in motocross, I think you need to understand how the bike works and respect its and your selfs limits to enjoy the ride and be safe.
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post #39 of 153 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 07:11 PM
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Great thread. I started on a ER6n (naked 650) and based on my personal level of maturity, experience, and self confidence, it felt right. The statement below sums it up:
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...Before considering the purchase of a motorcycle I asked myself why I truly wanted one. And none of my answers included girls, wheelies, insane speeds or what I look like to others, i.e. ego...
I wanted to ride "my ride". I actually don't have any riding buddies, and though it kinda sucks sometimes, I enjoy doing things solo just as much as with a group, it also makes it easier to ride your own pace. Motorcycling was that ONE thing I've always wanted, but always found an excuse to turn away. I thought I couldn't afford it, it was too dangerous, or that I just wasn't ready. Then it hit me, I'm going to die without ever owning my own motorcycle. Not quite a midlife crisis, but still a personal epiphany. So I took the MSF course, loved it, and rode the ER6n for nearly 7000 miles year-round in Denver (all street, commuting in traffic, and mountain rides). I had one spill, trying to get home before the snow hit. I hit black ice and the bike washed at slow speed, not much damage but enough to remove the scare of the dreaded "first crash".

I learned a LOT with that bike, how to roll on the throttle smoothly, apply brakes quickly in a controlled manner, and most importantly I focused on what the machine was telling me in different conditions, how different surfaces feel at different temperatures and weather conditions, how the bike's weight shifts when applying the brakes and throttle in varying degrees. I focused solely on learning to ride well (and navigate morning rush hour). Having a lot of experience with mountain biking and autos at the track, motorcycles just felt right.

Then and now, every ride, I am still learning and finding new ways to enjoy it. I now have a 2011 Z1000 and love it. I know the bike is capable of more than I am and it probably always will, but I'm OK with that.

I guess I'm one of the lucky ones, it just comes naturally. Some may REALLY want it, but they're just not wired for it. The most important thing is to acknowledge when something just isn't right for you and accept it.

-Dave
2011 Z1000
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post #40 of 153 (permalink) Old 02-24-2012, 09:01 PM
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I'm a firefighter and we go to a lot of accidents involving all sorts of bikes. I've been to a few with the rider DOA, most of the time if there is a witness we here the same thing over and over, " This dude just flew by me like I was standing still, next thing I know he is spawled out in the middle of the road with his bike in pieces." Gotta respect the machine your on and know your limits cause if you don't It will bite you in the ass.
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