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Discussion Starter #1
First and foremost I'd like to say that I'm a newbie to this site and while I'm not a current 6R owner I hope to be within the next couple of months. Actually that's why I'm glad I found this site because I was hoping to ask you all a few questions.

Initially I had planned to purchase a '02 ZX6R but then I stumbled across this site and saw some pictures and information topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=276 about the '03 6RR, which lead me to ask the following questions:

1) Is Kawasaki doing away with the standard 6R and only coming out with a 6RR in '03? Either way, does anyone know the MSRP for '03?

2) I've heard the '03 6RR is supposed to be fuel-injected? This being the case what are your thoughts and opinions on fuel-injected vs. carburated engines in bikes?

3) For those that own an '02 6R, would you consider trading it in for the '03?

Any help that you all could provide me with would be greatly appreciated. As I said before, I was all set to go and pick up an '02 in a few months and now I'm stuck trying to deceide between what year to get.
 

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Hey 6Rnovice..

welcome to the Board =) I hope you stick around... 2003 is going to be a hell of a year... The 2003 R6 has already been released and I must say its pretty darn sexy (you can look it up at http://www.yamaha.com)

The Honda has an all new CBR coming out (release date is tomorrow) and Kawasaki is releasing the 2003 line up Monday..

Suzuki is rumored to be unchanged this year (but they are very hush hush) Who knows?

Right now no one know what will be in store for the ZX6R, its all rumor right now. The pics are real though, You can bet the ZX6R will come in that style and colors...

About Fuel Injection, it seems like all the bikes are going that way so I would bet The ZX6R will be injected this year.. The R6, GSXR and the CBR are all injected now so Kawasaki would have to be stupid not to.

I am not so sure why FI has become so wanted... right now there are a lot more bike mechanics that can work wonders with carbs that don't know a thing about FI.. FI will give you more power and its easier to tweak (computer required) you can even change out your FI maps while you are riding...

I ride a Y2K ZX6R (2000) pretty much the same as the 01-02. I thought about selling my bike to pick up one of the new ones but it just doesn't make sense to me... Some people need to have the latest and greatest, if I had money like that than I probably would trade it for a new one every two or so years. But I don't and I can't see spending an additional $2000+ just to get a newer model when mine is prefect.

The MSRP for all 2003 are TBA, which means HIGH 8's if not low 9's but I know for a fact you can get the 2002 for $6700 + tax and tags (if not cheaper now)

You have a lot of good bikes to choose from.... but since you are new at riding you may not want to start on a BRAND SPANKING new bike that cost over 8K out the door? I am sure some guys and gals here can share some first week stories!!

If you do want to go new, I would go for the latest and greatest.. WHY NOT?

I have a friend that bought a YZF-600, the first thing I asked him was why not an YZF-R6, you don't want to be asking yourself that same question so if you go new go all the way but I suggest you don't...

Try every bike you can, sit on them.... feel the weight (even though dealer bikes are DEAD empty on all fluids) sit for a few minutes not on and off..

Hope this helps...
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Dave, that actually helped a lot. I plan on checking back periodically to see what's new and to learn as much as possible. You seem to have a good thing going here.

I agree with your theory about Kawasaki's decision to go with fuel-injection this coming year. In fact of the few complaints I heard from buyers the one heard most often was that this was the only bike to remain cabureted. I personally am a little skeptical of any first production year vehicle simply becuase I'd prefer to let someone else be the manufacturer's guinea pig. <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

On the subject of whether to buy new or used...I've thought about buying used, and I guess to some extent I haven't ruled it out entirely. I'm just very particular when it comes to buying any used vehicle because you can only trust the owner but so much. You rarely ever truely know a used bikes complete history. The other thing is that I have a hard time trying to justify spending around $5000 for something used, when for roughly $2000 more I can get what I really want with 0 miles, and a history that I'll be a part of from the beginning. Some people have a hard time seeing it that way but I have a feeling that most know what I mean.

I'm looking for something that I can be comfortable on, will look good, and I will be able to enjoy for a long time. Hopefully the '02 ZX6R will be everything that I want.

I want to say thanks for the welcome to the site and for all the helpful information you provided me with. Also, I read about the accident you were involved in and I wanted to say I'm sorry, but I'm glad to hear that you're okay. On a daily basis, I see riders abusing their privelages and that makes it hard to hear stories about the innocent/responsible riders getting taken out. But, I guess that's why they call them accident's right? Anyway, thanks again.
 

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I agree with you 100%

I would rather buy new because there is no history. But not everyone can afford that choice... I agree I would rather spend an extra 2G's for a new vehicle then get a used one for 2G's cheaper

When you buy used you never know what you're going to get... For the most part people sell vehicles because there is something wrong with them that they would rather not deal with anymore.

The one thing about bikes is You never know and you never will know.... A seller can say - "having a baby bike must go..." which means I dropped the bike fixed what can be seen and couldn't get that damn frame straight.

Or "Bought new bike - no room in garage for this one" which means I crashed it got paid on insurance and bought a new bike. Oh that damage is from a tip over when I was cleaning the bike, I brought it to a professional to get fixed which means "I used JB WELB and touchup paint to fix the bike"

Since your new to the sport keep your options open... Look at all the bike new and used... get your local paper (the car buyers guide ones) and look at what for sale.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I completely agree with those two little scenarios you propsed. That's exactly what I was getting at buy saying you can only trust the person your buying a used bike from only so much. That holds especially true in my area. There are a lot of people around here (young & old) who purchase bikes, wreck them/dog em, and then unload them on some unsuspecting buyer. Just watching the way some people ride around here is enough to discourage me from buying used. But again, I will definitely keep my options open because occasionally there are those great deals out there.

Well, hopefully if all goes as planned today I plan to get and get my learners. The state of Maryland offers a 4 day motorcycle course that costs about $100 and I'm thinking about taking that in October. It seems worth it to me cause you get 2 days in class learning about the bike and how to ride safe, then 2 days on the bike practicing what you learned. At the end, if you pass all the tests, you receive you motorcycle license. You guys think it sounds like it's worth the money?
 

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quote:

The state of Maryland offers a 4 day motorcycle course that costs about $100 and I'm thinking about taking that in October. You guys think it sounds like it's worth the money?
I sent Sally to the same course (NYS) cost me $375 so $100 is a steal =)

She loved the course and said it was well worth getting up at 7 am for three days. She learned a lot from it =)
 

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I'm a new rider myself, I took the MSF rider course this summer in NY and learned a lot that should be really helpful when I actually start riding. Like 6Rnovice I'm in the market for my first bike and have been searching all over the net for information. I know virtually no one that rides so I've been trying to educate myself as much as I can. This site has been so helpful and I've been reading everyone's posts almost daily. Another site I found that might be of interest is
Used Motorcycle Evaluation Guide It's extremely thorough about buying used bikes and I found that I learned a lot about bike maintence just from reading through it. Best of luck on your purchase.
 

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I've been riding since april and had put 10k miles on my 250. I think i'm ready for the 600 and will be getting the R6 soon. I had 4k miles before i took the MSF course of which i learned very little from, having read ton of riding books already. Giving that limited 4k miles experience, yet stood to learn little from the course. That should tell ya MSF course isnt the silver bullet. It teaches important but trivial skills. It isnt enough to prevent you from making many mistakes or dramatically cut short of learning time. I personally found out that starting from a small bike gained me riding skills much quicker. I now ride my friends' 600s better than they do. And they started on their 600s last year.
I, of course, wanted a 600 to start out. Because, they look good. And when you havent riden, the only satisfaction you get from the bike is how it looks. Once you start riding, you'd be too busy learning the skills, getting used to speed/wind and enjoying riding or scared of it, you'd hardly be concerned about looks for a long while to come. I've gone through many mistakes mentioned in all the books i read. I once thought, i wouldnt make these mistakes, 'cuze i already read about them. Was i wrong!. Some i went through sooner, others later. But i'd gone through many of them and probably more to come as my skill advances. I've skid the rear releasing the clutch too fast one day. I went wide on the corner another day. I rolled off going around corner as panic kicked in. I constantly coasted the clutch going around corner. I took me quite some time to get around downshifting, braking, setting up good entry speed for cornering ( so much attention was paid to learning this skill that i forgot about traffic!..:). If you read twist of the wrist II on how your attention is divided, the author couldnt be more right). I locked up the front tire one time. They didnt all happen immediately, but here and there. And you know whats good about having this 250?. It was forgiving enough to not get me in trouble. It didnt scare me enough to try again. I couldnt imagine myself having to learn all this on a 600. If i did learn on a 600, it would have taken much longer.
I dont wanna try to persuade you one way or other. This topic has been discussed over and over again. But safety reasons were stretched more than others. Some people can reason themselves out when it comes to safety. "Oh, I'm matured. I just wont go fast till i've learned to ride better"..etc. Its not just that. I have a perfect driving record for 10 years. I'm a matured adult. So I wasnt lacked of traffic safety awareness or maturity. But what i learned was that you just simply learn to ride better in a much shorter time on small bike than big bike. So if you care about shortening your learning time as much as possible, be willing to waste some money, start with a smaller bike!. Once, you see yourself revving the sh*t out of that 250 or redlining it on country roads or doing 80m/hr around 45m/hr corner. You're ready for a bigger bike. I know i did all that and i think i'm now ready....:). Again, i'm not trying to lecture you. I just wanted to share my experience with you.
 

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ndb: great entry! I have 2500 miles on a Kawasaki EX500, and what would have become of me had I been able to afford a ZX6R as my first bike, I dunno. I was so anxious and scared after a second-day-of-riding low-speed plop (inadequate throttle when practicing a hugely wide U-turn... and had forgotten to shut the choke off once the baby was warm),trying to get through rotaries around here (Boston, King of the Dangerous Rotaries), or manage a smooth start on an uphill, right turn stoplight (Aaagghhhh!!) that at first I thought I ought to just say I'd learned my lesson without injury and get rid of the bike. Stayed with it, and am wary, but pleased. Your story and your counsel are wise and welcome.

"Abandon All Sloth, Ye Who Enter Here!"
 
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