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It would be extremely expensive, you would have to do it in smaller pieces due to the maximum size the machines can handle, and they wouldn't be as strong as OEM or aftermarket fairings.

I was looking at doing a fender eliminator, and it would end up being close to $200 just for that small part in a thickness that would be strong enough.
 

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It would be extremely expensive, you would have to do it in smaller pieces due to the maximum size the machines can handle, and they wouldn't be as strong as OEM or aftermarket fairings.

I was looking at doing a fender eliminator, and it would end up being close to $200 just for that small part in a thickness that would be strong enough.
Agreed. 3d printing is awesome and all but is still very size and cost limited. A better route if you wanted to make your own fairings would be to model it. Cam it out of foam and hand lay in fiberglass or carbon fiber. Still probably more expensive than oem or aftermarket stuff.

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I ♥ Cute Cats!
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I deal a fair amount with ABS 3D printers and the finished parts are truly for "mock-up" only. I am having some things printed that have to get bolted to an engine in a couple of months so they are of a higher grade polymer which costs a lot more. While a "high-end" ABS printer can cost upwards of $10,000 the Fortus machine that I need to use STARTS at ~$185,000. A higher-end one that'll print a fairing? That's a $380,000 machine.

Then JUST the polymer I'm using costs ~$700 a canister and has 1500cc's of polymer. So if you want to print a fairing? You're looking at over $1,000 EACH. There's a reason why 3d printers are often called "Rapid Prototyping" machines. They aren't something you can print structural components economically.
 

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Agreed. 3d printing is awesome and all but is still very size and cost limited. A better route if you wanted to make your own fairings would be to model it. Cam it out of foam and hand lay in fiberglass or carbon fiber. Still probably more expensive than oem or aftermarket stuff.

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Wouldn't it be easier to just make the mold off an existing piece? That's what we did for race fairings...
 

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I don't know the details but a friend of mine at work was doing a project on 3d printing metal that is apparently being used in industry.

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Wouldn't it be easier to just make the mold off an existing piece? That's what we did for race fairings...
Im sure you could as long as you where careful to not warp the original piece too much during the molding process. It would suck to take the time to mold it and find out you have a fairing thay wont line up right.

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The Indifference Engine
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Im sure you could as long as you where careful to not warp the original piece too much during the molding process. It would suck to take the time to mold it and find out you have a fairing thay wont line up right.

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I'm saying I've done it.
 

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Pretty cool man ...Start it up dude? if you think something is possible why not try a hand in it yourself?

Or are you too lazy to start it up
the equipment alone runs about 2,000-20,000 depending on what type of printer you get, then you need the raw materials...im not sure if it would be cost/effective compared to some of the Chinese aftermarket stuff on flea-bay for like 300bucks
 

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CAD'ing up a fairing would be difficult and "time consuming"...to say the least....you can just get them scanned...scanner accuracy is very good with current stuff and with the right software/equipment you can go from scan to solid model with little or no extra CAD time...(ie: $$$) Even just getting a point cloud off of a CMM would be helpful....we have a ROMER arm here that can do this.

Once you have a model...well, Vex covered that very well. FDM parts are OK and the cheapest of the machines and materials...they are good for fit checks and test of concept...but not very functional. You can get desktop FDM machines for small parts (6x6x6 inches) for ~$1200.

I always thought making vacuum formed (or injection molded) side panels out of colored HDPE (same stuff as MX bodywork) would be great for trackday use....tough, abrasion resistant, hot air weldable, no painting....you rash it up, just go over the rash with a heat gun.

Metal 3D parts...yes, there is "Selective Laser Sintering" of powdered metal. Other times you can make a pattern out of a rapid prototype and sand cast a metal part.
 

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Frame sliders maybe an easier print. Strength might be questionable though which tends to be the problem with most 3D printed items.
 
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