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Discussion Starter #1
after i rode tonight, i went to go fill up at the local exxon station, i always fill up with the 89 octane fuel. when my tank was all filled up, i glanced into the tank and noticed the fuel was not clear like usual, instead it had a bluish/greenish tint. Is it me, or are they doing something to our fuel supply? or is it something in my tank taht's causing this color?

kinda has that coolant looking glow to it.
 

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That is the normal color for fuel in our area.......Atlantic Canada region........brownish for reg......greenish for supreme...


Jason

Everyone has their own thing.....
 

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2003 636 model has higher compression and needs minimum of 92 but since no one really makes a 92 must go to 93-94 octane. But even if my bike said min. 89 octane I'd still put in 93.

With Great Power(111HP to be exact)... Comes Great Responsibility
 

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My 03 sticker said no less than 90 grade, but I usually add Outlaw octane boost to my tank. You just have to be careful not to foul your plugs from running too rich.

-Cops want a hot pursuit, so entertain them! -Shadee
 

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Originally posted by tommyboynjataol

2003 636 model has higher compression and needs minimum of 92 but since no one really makes a 92 must go to 93-94 octane.
That is not quite right.

The tank sticker on the 2003 bike suggests a minimum of 90 pump octane.
 

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Exceding your octane rating will result in less hp, but going less then your octane rating will damage the engine. People seem to think high octane is good, while its not bad, you wont get optimum performance.

Its regular all the way for my old girl (97 zx6r) but then thats what the manual reccomends too... :)
 

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I got my '95 second-hand, anyone know what is recommended for it? I have always put in 89, seems to be fine...

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Step 2-Hold on!
 

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its all a matter of compression. if it says min. of 87 and you run 93 your 1) running a cooler engine 2) losing power because of the unspent gasses that have to exit. when it says min. 90 and you run 87 its gonna run leaner and hotter. prolly wouldnt lose performance, that is, untill you smoke a valve. or "knock" til a hole gets made in the piston from detonation.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
from what i read on the pdf file, it says min 91 and 87 is average? does it mean it's better to run 91, but it's OK to run 87?

Originally posted by Rob Lee

According to the service spec, Kawasaki suggests 87 pump octane for the 1999 bike. To be sure, check the tank sticker on your bike.
 

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Originally posted by linm

from what i read on the pdf file, it says min 91 and 87 is average? does it mean it's better to run 91, but it's OK to run 87?
Not quite.

The service spec reads Min 91 Research/87 Avg. Oct. Unleaded OK. The first number, 91, is a Research Octane Number. The second number, 87, is an average octane number, which US pumps show. The average octane number is the average of a Research Octane Number and a Motor Octane Number. You may have seen the formula (RON+MON)/2 on pump octane labels.

The spec then suggests a minimum of 87 pump octane. Using higher octane has no practical benefit.
 

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why do people who drag race zx-6r's tend to use higher racing ocane in their bikes then if there is a performance loss from using a higher octane?


just curious?





My Drinking Team Has a Racing Problem!
 

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The Kawasaki spec sheet for the 636 says the same exact thing that all the previous 6r's have said over the years:

Min. 91 Research/87 Avg Octane Unleaded OK.

The 87 octane fuel you see at the gas pumps is what Kawasaki itself recommends be run in the bike. They don't mind if you run a higher grade gasoline, they just don't require it.

I personally wouldn't run the top grade gasoline in a bike (anymore, I stopped in the last year) unless I actually have encountered detonation, I'm seriously abusing the motor (ie- near-pro racing), or unless I've made internal motor changes that have increased the compression ratio (pistons/head and block planing, etc).

I personally have compared different octane gasoline back to back and always have found MUCH better gas mileage using 87 octane, no matter what bike I'm running. The same even applies to my cars.

BC.


I didn't do it, I swear.
And even if I did, what makes you think I would admit it to you?
 

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I think Bard knows. I don't, sorry but he mentioned something about it a while ago.

Josh As far as the color of your gas goes, what you saw in your tank isn't anything to be worried about.

Now a little off topic here but I'm under the impression that with a higher octane you avoid detonation in your engine as well as having a cooler and slower burning fuel. I've dealt with nitrous quite a bit and you always run higher octane in order to help avoid detonation, among other things but the fuel has a lot to do with it. I was also thinking that the octane of the fuel wouldn't affect the air/fuel ratio enough to make a difference and that's what a lean or rich condition is. So by my thinking, running a higher octane fuel will not change the air fuel ratio making an engine run lean, if anything it will help reduce ping/detonation but not necessarily have any performance advantages.

Now I'm not saying I'm right your wrong because there is a lot I don't know and understand, I'm just saying I don't understand what your saying.

Josh


Stupid hurts.
 
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