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Discussion Starter #1
Right , i took my bike out for a blast a few days ago , it was warmed up nicely and i was driving it hard , anyway got back to work parked it up. after work i came out and noticed a few drips of oil on the ground , i drove it slowly for the 2 miles home. anyway once i got it home i had a look at the oil and there was very little left (i had changed the oil three days previously) but also there seemed to be water in with the oil !!!
does anyone have any idea what the hell i have done to my bike ????
a friend of mine thinks i might have blown a head gasket.
I'd appreciate any help you can offer.
 

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If coolant was leaking into the oil, I'm sure you would have noticed a bad exhaust from the bike... can you say SMOKE...

Doesn't sound good though... how much oil is "very little left"???

"Keep yer feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No there is no more smoke than normal (which is not a lot), wand when i say there is very little oil left i mean it is just down below the mininmum marker , but what is more worrying is there is water up to about the maximum marker.
 

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If you have water mixing with the oil then you will find a light brown sludge on the dipstick. That would indicate a blown head gasket. Alteratively, is your oil drain plug tight enough? And your oil filter?

Can you see where the oil actually originates from?

2002 ZX636R A1, silver/black
 

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You may have not seated the oil filter properly, if you didn't oil the o-ring on the filter, it may have kinked when you tightened it up.
The easiest way to check for a head gasket failure is to look in the the coolant expansion bottle. If the water looks like its got washing up liquid in it, then theres a chance the head gasket has gone. As for water in the oil, if the heads intact, its from condensation and will cause the oil to emulsify (a mayo like substance will form in there) To cure this just give the bike a really good run and get it nice and hot. A compression test will tell you for sure if the gasket has gone.

Live to ride, Erm Erm Wheres My Car Keys
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help so far, if the head gasket is gone , is this gonna be a big job to fix?? i only bought the bike a few months back and i have had nothing but shit luck with it , is it likely that this problem has been developing for a while?
 

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did'nt see the last post, That much coolant in the crankcase isn't good. But then again oil floats on water and should be the other way round ?.

Live to ride, Erm Erm Wheres My Car Keys
 

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Discussion Starter #8
you know that is very true , i completely forgot about the whole oil and water thing , which probably means that there is no oil at all in the engine . I only assumed that it was water as it looked like it had the viscosity of water rather than oil.
 

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The water should really be the same colour as the coolant (which is green or blue if this is the case. The expansion bottles arent very big so a loss would show on the level straight away.
I would have thought that water in the engine would have serously affected the performance.

Live to ride, Erm Erm Wheres My Car Keys
 

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That is very interesting. As the wheather has gotten colder here I noticed a milky substance on the insided of the oil sight glass and was concerned about it. However, my bike only has 2900 miles and runs perfect, so I figured there was no way it was the headgasket. I also figured condensation, but wondered how it would get there.

 

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The condensation would have got there through the crank case breather, Its called emulsification and if left will block the oilways into the head. The only way to get rid of it is to get the bike hot enough to burn it off, It is caused by making short journeys in cold weather

Live to ride, Erm Erm Wheres My Car Keys
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ash what you say there is exactley the conditions the bike has been put through , altough i always wait until she is warm before i drive it, would this emulsification lead to an oil loss like i describe??
i didnt notice any loss of performance on the way home from work even though i was taking it easy , she didnt seem down on power in the lower revs.
Thanks again for all your help , it's really good to come across a place like this with people willing to offer good advice.
 

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I would think that the oil loss was caused by either the filter not sealing or a faulty union within the oil system(unlikely), if this isn't apparent, dig the tank off and look in the airbox, you will see if the breather is depositing oil in the filter. (the breather pipe is the large bore pipe leading into the top of the airbox from behind the carbs) There is also a chance that a blockage within the crankcase breather system to cause a large volume of oil to be lost in this way (it syphons up when partially blocked) and it would end up on the dirty side of the filter in the bottom of the airbox. I would guess there are drain holes in there as well so this could be a possible place for the oil to appear from.
When you check the oil, try and be consistent where you do it (on level ground) and allow the oil to drain for 5 minutes before sighting the glass with the bike vertical. This may sound obvious but different manufacturers state different methods (some ask for a measurement after killing the engine whilst the oils still in the head).

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
 

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Originally posted by ash

The condensation would have got there through the crank case breather, Its called emulsification and if left will block the oilways into the head. The only way to get rid of it is to get the bike hot enough to burn it off, It is caused by making short journeys in cold weather

Live to ride, Erm Erm Wheres My Car Keys
How do I get the bike hot enough to burn it off? Just let it idle? I have been riding a few days a week but the temps have been cool and I only have about a 3 mile ride to work and no highway. With the cool weather the temp on the bike only gets to about 160f.

 

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Take a longer ride.

Also, it is likely that the battery charge does not refresh during the short trips. Consider a battery tender if you do not use one.
 

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Agree with Rob Lee, If I take my bike to work in the winter, I take the long way home every other day to avoid this.

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
 

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Originally posted by ash

Agree with Rob Lee, If I take my bike to work in the winter, I take the long way home every other day to avoid this.

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
Unfortunately I have no "long way" home, aside from avoiding home all together! Either a 10 minute ride on city streets, or a 5 minute blast up the freeway. [?]

 

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The only solution to protecting your asset is to put your self out and give it a decent run getting it hot for an hour or so every weekend or don't ride it until it warms up. There is no quick fix unfortunately for this. At least if you know what the problem is you can deal with it. Either that or get a moped for your commute and save the bike. Winter makes a real mess of the japanese bikes, They just aren't built to cope with it.

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
 
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