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Discussion Starter #1
can the line be in between the notches when adjusting it? or does it have to line up on the notch? and will i need a stand? i bought my bike about 7 moths ago and i havent adjusted the chain yet. it has 2000 miles and i know it needs to be tightend. i know its a newbie question but i just want to be sure.

Vin:"I live my life a 1/4 mile at a time"
Arturo:Hahahahhaha...Why?
 

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You don't have to align the mark, just make sure that both sides are equal. When you tighten, just count the number of sides the bolts turn on each side.
And no you don't need a stand.I'm quite sure it tells you how much slack you need in the owner's manual.

go green or go home!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
just to make sure i:
1. remove the pin
2. loosen the hex nut?or remove it?
3. turn the bolts on both sides equally until i reach desired amount

i dont know but i think i heard somewhere the something (a nut or bolt) is turned "counter" clockwise to tighten or "clockwise" to loosen...is this applied somwhere?


Vin:"I live my life a 1/4 mile at a time"
Arturo:Hahahahhaha...Why?
 

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To adjust the chain slack,
  • Remove the cotter pin, and then loosen the axle nut.
  • Loosen both adjuster lock nuts.
  • Turn the adjusters forward or rearward until the chain has the proper slack. The right and left alignment indicators should be at the same position on the swingarm.
That being said, the swingarm marks are notoriously inaccurate. If you are particular, learn how to check the alignment using an alternate method, such as the string or straightedge method.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks guys!

Vin:"I live my life a 1/4 mile at a time"
Arturo:Hahahahhaha...Why?
 

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Rob...
Just wanted to know, I've done the string method, and found that it looked good. I was not too confident about the accuracy, though.Can you explain what the straightedge method is?


go green or go home!
 

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In short, the straightedge method takes a long, straight-edged board on each side of the bike.

When the wheel is properly aligned, the boards will be flush against the rear tire sidewalls and leave the same gap on either side of a straight front tire.
 

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Just make sure you don't use typical 2"x3"x8' studs... they're notoriously non-straight...

"Keep yer feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked."
 

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I made a neat little tool for checking rear wheel alignment. You need 2 10' joints of 1/2" metal conduit and two 10"x1/4 carrage bolts and a couple of wing nuts. Cut the conduit to 8'and drill two holes in each piece about a foot from the and and a foot apart. Now clamp the two pieces of conduit together using the carriage bolts through the rear wheel near the bottom. Now prop the front or the conduit that is sticking out past the front wheel up 'til it just clears the brake rotors. Now you can adjust the rear wheel until the conduit is the same distance from each rotor. You will be amazed how far out the factory marks are.
 
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