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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Feel free to chime in everyone and add to the list

Motorcycle Roadcraft (Book) (williamr)



For riders who are reading these tips, please chime in if you think some tips are a bit too basic.
It's sometimes a bit difficult to gauge what's a basic skill and what isn't especially since having ridden for so long, what seems basic to me may not be basic at all to you.
Or, just post up what you think of the tips. :)


Disclaimer: Kawiforums, I (bubbleboys), nor any other contributor to this list of tips can or will be held liable in any form for any of the tips provided within this forum thread. This list of tips is exactly that, a list of tips; you are free to choose which tips to use or not use at your own free will. Exercise caution when using these tips as some tips may not apply to you or the locale in which you ride. Every attempt is made at making this list of tips as universal as possible but it is not always possible.


Riding Techniques
  • @Intersections with a Red Light/Stop Sign
    • Stay in first gear until at least the car behind you comes to a stop (HULK)
      Reason: cagers are inattentive and will run you over if they don't notice you, which they often fail to do.
    • Place your bike somewhat in the center of the lane and angled so that it points diagonally to the left or right.
      Reason: God forbid, some car doesn't seem to think I'm there and doesn't show signs of slowing down, I'm already pointed at an escape path and don't need to worry about accelerating and then turning; I just accelerate out of the way.
      Also, by angling the bike slightly, you create a larger profile for cars to see which is always good
    • Wait for a few seconds or until one of the cars travelling in the same direction has entered the intersection after a light turns green. Then look both ways before entering the intersection (S.E.E.) before taking off.
      Reason: Cars will try to run the stop light. (Me, Limegreenninja, 03black636)
    • If a car is coming up behind you, flash your brake lights multiple times to get the driver's attention.
      Reason: To make it clear to the inattentive cagers that you are there and that they shouldn't run you over.
    • If in the left turn lane, don't go all the way to the line. Keep a car to half a car's length behind the line.
      Reason: Cars making left turns often like to cut into the left turn lane, especially if they're speeding through the left turn catching the last bit of the turn light.
    • If there is a car in the opposite direction who is going to make a left, try to veer out or place yourself so that you are visible, especially if you are behind a car. (sansfenders)
      Reason: Because of the small size of the bikes, you're likely completely blocked from view of oncoming traffic. Should minimize the likelihood of people turning into you or in front of you because they didn't see you.
    • Even if you don't have a stop sign but the intersecting road does, slow down so that you can see down the intersecting road and be able to stop in case someone runs the stop sign (cyberdos) (taken from http://www.kawiforums.com/two-wheeled-discussion/138318-commuter-safety-tips.html)
      Reason: "A friend of mine once told me that he used to ride through an intersection where he just didn't feel comfortable in. He said that although he didn't have the stop sign, he always made it a point to slow down to a crawl through the intersection. After 2 years of commuting, one day someone blew through the stop and he nearly t-boned them. Those 2 years of precaution through there paid dividends that day."
  • Braking
    • At low speeds (sub 5-10 mph), avoid using your front brakes.
      Reason: at low speeds, the weight transfer effect on the front wheel is negligible. As such, there is no benefit to using your front brake at such low speeds.
      However, if you lose your front wheel traction, you're more than likely won't recover. Recovering from a loss of rear wheel traction is much simpler and very "easy" to do so once your reflexes have come in. (williamr)
    • Start with most of the braking power on the front brakes. As your speed decreases to a stop, shift the braking power from the front to the rear brake. For the last 5-10 meters of braking, you should be on the rear brake only.
      Reason: I've always done this just because I liked a smooth ride but there are safety benefits to this as well.
      If you've ever driven on a low traction surface (aka winter and icy roads) in a car, you know that slowing down isn't the real problem; stopping completely is the big problem. With mild and controlled braking, your wheels will not lock up when slowing down from a high speed but are pretty much guaranteed to lock up with the same pressure on the brakes in the last 15mph of braking. Your experiences might be slightly different, maybe all the cars I've driven are the exception but this has been my experience for the par.
      Carried over, expect that you will have low traction the last bit of braking. If you lose your traction on the front wheel, you're pretty much screwed. Lost rear wheel traction is fairly easy to recover from.
Riding Techniques (continued)
Road Hazards
Street Tricks

Continued here
 

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Thanks for the tip about the lights. I'll remember that next time I'm in the States. All of our lights now go through a phase of all being red, often with green lights for pedestrians to cross during the break, so if you do move off a bit sharp all you're likely to hit is a pedestrain - or a cyclist who thinks that the lights don't apply to him.

Golden rule is to position yourself so that you're in a defensive 'bubble' of time and space. You can trade these off. If you're tight for space, increase the time by going slower. Again, read Motorcycle Roadcraft.

Rob
 

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Man, I reckon if I was at the front of the queue at the lights and it went green and I counted "one one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand" I'd get honked at by the traffic behind. I understand the need to check the intersection is clear before you enter it but I don't think waiting 3 seconds to go is necessary.

I got told that flash the brake lights thing with a car looming up behind after we all watched the video of that guy that got smashed from behind and landed on his feet. It's a bloody good idea!

Road Hazards: Avoid sudden changes in direction or speed when crossing white lines in the wet

I don't know if it's recommended but I like to think that I sometimes eliminate motion camouflage by weaving ever so slightly in my lane.
 

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Overwhelming Splendidery
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I don't know if it's recommended but I like to think that I sometimes eliminate motion camouflage by weaving ever so slightly in my lane.
I do this too. I also signal with both my lights (stock signals on rear, so they aren't piddly LEDs) and use hand signals with them to increase visibility.
 

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When at a stop light and there is no car behind me, I like to place my bike somewhat in the center of the lane and angle my bike so that it points diagonally to the left or right. Reason I do this is because, God forbid, some car doesn't seem to think I'm there and doesn't show signs of slowing down, I'm already pointed at an escape path and don't need to worry about accelerating and then turning; I just accelerate out of the way. Also, by angling the bike slightly, you create a larger profile for cars to see which is always good. Of course, by doing this, you aren't able to take off like a beast from the stop light but I don't do that anyways.
I do this a good bit of the time myself as well. I feel much safer doing this than being straight on where you can't get out of the way quick enough. Great advice and I'm glad I'm not the only one doing that! :p
 

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Good post! Highly informative, I'll keep this information in the back of my head while riding.

Flashing people as they approach you .. I can't believe I didn't think of doing that. Definitely will use that technique this year. (Too bad I didn't have one of those sequential taillight mods so I could just hold it down and it'd flash)

I tried repping you, but it says I need to spread the love first ;)
 

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When at a stop light and there is a car coming up behind me from a distance, I flash my brake lights multiple times to get the driver's attention. Cars will probably see you anyways but I prefer to make it even more clear to the inattentive cagers that I'm there. For all I know, my life/bike could've been saved from a few nasty rearends by this behavior by now. I'll never know and I hope never to find out.
I find my self flashing the brake like a lot. Even if the car is already stopped and is trying to creep up on me. I also sometimes rock side the side if I see the guy is paying no attention to me while I flash the brake light.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the tip about the lights. I'll remember that next time I'm in the States. All of our lights now go through a phase of all being red, often with green lights for pedestrians to cross during the break, so if you do move off a bit sharp all you're likely to hit is a pedestrain - or a cyclist who thinks that the lights don't apply to him.

Golden rule is to position yourself so that you're in a defensive 'bubble' of time and space. You can trade these off. If you're tight for space, increase the time by going slower. Again, read Motorcycle Roadcraft.

Rob
yeah that won't happen in the US. We're too big and if the federal government were to pass a federal mandate for that, states would cry about expanding federal oversight. Would be nice if all the states would implement something like that. Might cut down on T-boning accidents.

Man, I reckon if I was at the front of the queue at the lights and it went green and I counted "one one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand" I'd get honked at by the traffic behind. I understand the need to check the intersection is clear before you enter it but I don't think waiting 3 seconds to go is necessary.

I got told that flash the brake lights thing with a car looming up behind after we all watched the video of that guy that got smashed from behind and landed on his feet. It's a bloody good idea!

Road Hazards: Avoid sudden changes in direction or speed when crossing white lines in the wet

I don't know if it's recommended but I like to think that I sometimes eliminate motion camouflage by weaving ever so slightly in my lane.
noted and added to the list

3 seconds is a bit on the long side for me but I've never gotten honked for it. If someone did honk me for that, I'd probably just sit there to piss the guy off and teach him some manners. I wouldn't do that for the light warning honks but I've done that before for the full on get the fuck out of the way honks.

I do this too. I also signal with both my lights (stock signals on rear, so they aren't piddly LEDs) and use hand signals with them to increase visibility.
hand signals when you're switching lanes or braking?

I find my self flashing the brake like a lot. Even if the car is already stopped and is trying to creep up on me. I also sometimes rock side the side if I see the guy is paying no attention to me while I flash the brake light.
yeah, ny cars definitely like to do that. See how close they can get to the back of my bike. If I turn around and look at them, it usually stops them.
 

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Thanks for the tips. As for the stopped at an intersection part, I usually stop near the stripe, angled about 20 degrees towards the next lane, directly in view of the side mirror of the car in front of me (assuming I don't filter forward, which is something that is apparently legal here in Kalifornia.) I used to stop dead center, but I don't like the feeling of being trapped.

The weaving in the lane thing is also a good tip, but I mainly do it because the stock mirrors on my motorcycle are utter crap.
 

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I don't know if this will benefit anyone, or if it was me just being ignorant.

In construction zones where the city is ripping up the old lane marker lines, there are little dips left behind. I didn't think too much about it until my front wheel tracked along to the left of one. It almost landed me on the tar mack, and I wish I had thought about it before hand.

Small graded sections that look harmless can be nasty even at the slow speed I was cruising at.


Cheers!
 

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i suggest not falling down.


i don't feel like reading, but a trick for red lights here.. well, SOME of them.. is to bump the starter button. the electromagnetic pulse from the current running to the starter trips the inductive pickup loop in the roadway in some cases.. not always.. but sometimes. lol

this shit should be stickied.. but in the meantime i will link this in my how-to thread.

 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #12
i suggest not falling down.


i don't feel like reading, but a trick for red lights here.. well, SOME of them.. is to bump the starter button. the electromagnetic pulse from the current running to the starter trips the inductive pickup loop in the roadway in some cases.. not always.. but sometimes. lol

this shit should be stickied.. but in the meantime i will link this in my how-to thread.
i am so honored whitey
my life is complete now, I can die happy :lol:

but thanks whitey
 

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yeah that won't happen in the US. We're too big and if the federal government were to pass a federal mandate for that, states would cry about expanding federal oversight. Would be nice if all the states would implement something like that. Might cut down on T-boning accidents.


.
Local authorities are responsible for setting the timing of traffic lights, and over the years they've all gradually set them with a pause at 'all red' simply because they've found that it reduces accidents on their 'patch'. To me that just seems like commonsense.

Lights where there's a record of accidents also tend to be fitted with automatic cameras that issue a ticket to any vehicle jumping the lights.

There's no central government mandate or regulation. Local authorities have just found that it saves them the cost and hassle of clearing up the mess.

Nothing stopping you from finding out which authority is responsible for the lights in your area and lobbying for a trial at any lights with a poor accident record.

Rob
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #15
Switching lanes, and mostly turning left.
not a bad idea though I don't even remember what the hand signals mean off the top of my head. I doubt most cagers would either

Local authorities are responsible for setting the timing of traffic lights, and over the years they've all gradually set them with a pause at 'all red' simply because they've found that it reduces accidents on their 'patch'. To me that just seems like commonsense.

Lights where there's a record of accidents also tend to be fitted with automatic cameras that issue a ticket to any vehicle jumping the lights.

There's no central government mandate or regulation. Local authorities have just found that it saves them the cost and hassle of clearing up the mess.

Nothing stopping you from finding out which authority is responsible for the lights in your area and lobbying for a trial at any lights with a poor accident record.

Rob
hm might very well do that
 

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Overwhelming Splendidery
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not a bad idea though I don't even remember what the hand signals mean off the top of my head. I doubt most cagers would either
Looking at the idiot on the orange bike flailing his arms around is good enough for me. At least they will make eye contact whilst they run me over :D

Like I said, I just do them in conjunction with my signal lights so try and make myself/my intentions more noticeable.
 

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As far as the waiting 3 seconds before taking off, aren't you supposed to check both ways before entering an intersection no matter what the light color? Usually you can see the people trying to catch the last bit of the light.
 

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not a bad idea though I don't even remember what the hand signals mean off the top of my head. I doubt most cagers would either
All done with the left hand (in the US) with a flat palm and fingers.

Right turn: Extend arm to the side with your hand upward 90°.
Left Turn: Extend arm to the side with your hand outward.
Stop: Extend arm to the side with your hand downward 90°.

Note, any of the above hand motions can be modified with only the middle finger extended instead of a flat palm. This will result in many road goers giving you a honk back as a form of "thank you" for the additional effort in communicating your directional intentions. They may try to have a conversation as they drive by, but as we all know, it's difficult to talk with a helmet on.
 

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Note, any of the above hand motions can be modified with only the middle finger extended instead of a flat palm. This will result in many road goers giving you a honk back as a form of "thank you" for the additional effort in communicating your directional intentions. They may try to have a conversation as they drive by, but as we all know, it's difficult to talk with a helmet on.
Lmao, this wins. Sometimes they look very disgruntled when trying to communicate and I just shrug my shoulders and tap my helmet. :dunno:
 
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