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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #21
By bumping the starter do you mean trying to start the engine when it's already cranked?
I would imagine so.

Looking at the idiot on the orange bike flailing his arms around is good enough for me. At least they will make eye contact whilst they run me over :D

Like I said, I just do them in conjunction with my signal lights so try and make myself/my intentions more noticeable.
haha sounds good Added

As far as the waiting 3 seconds before taking off, aren't you supposed to check both ways before entering an intersection no matter what the light color? Usually you can see the people trying to catch the last bit of the light.
no matter the light color? I doubt you should be doing that when the light has been green for a while. Seems like it unnecessarily takes your attention off the road.

But looking both ways before entering the intersection when its just turned green, not a bad idea. Added
 

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Ninja Bike Forum Mod
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Keeping on eye on cross traffic at any intersection should be part of S.E.E. to make sure someone isn't trying to run the red because he doesn't see a motorcycle coming down the road as easily as a car.

I see you made it back to Rockford safely, bb. Thanks for coming out to the show and hitting up the brewery with us.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #23
Yup, actually down in Indianapolis right now on business.
Thanks for having me. Too bad I don't have my bike out here, weather is getting better and better. Was like 40-50 in Indianapolis yesterday. Could drive with the window down.
 

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Ninja Bike Forum Mod
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Now it's just time to remove the salt from the roads so I can bring out the toys.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #25
I kind of want this winter to last longer just because I'm jealous about not being able to ride while I'm out here :(
 

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Ninja Bike Forum Mod
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Rent a HD from one of the umpteen billion dealerships around here.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #28
eh, i'll probably just take flights back to ny and ride the entire time I'm not with friends
 

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Back on safety again - I've posted a time or two that all the Hi Vis gear in the world is no substitute for proper positioning.

There's some new research from the UK that supports that view - you'll be seen but ignored, which putsthe onus firmly on the rider to give himself room and time. As we know that proper positioning works, but this seems to imply that it won't, there are more questions than answers for the time being.

It's new research and the reasons aren't clear at all, and it may not stand up to further scrutiny, but while evidence gathering continues it's good to accept that you might really be invisible.

Rob
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #30
Good point william, can you think of any specific tips which are often overlooked?

All I can think of right now are the obvious stay out of blind spots, etc which doesn't really fit the theme of this thread.
 

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The stuff in Roadcraft on positioning gives suggested approaches to every type of hazzard. One suggestion I'd make is that you need to position clear of background clutter.

In general, if you move away from a potential hazzard you increase your chance of being seen, and of seeing any possible movement. As an example, for the States where you drive on the right, if you're on a straight road and there's a minor road, mall exit, or whatever on your right, then move towards the crown of the road, away from that exit. You will be easier to see, and you will be able to look deeper into the intersection so if theres a car there you've got a better chance of seeing if it starts to move out. If there are obstructions, such as walls up to the corner, you've got a better chance of even seeing a car waiting to pull out, and if it does, because you're further away from it at the crown, you've got more room and more time to take avoiding action. If the exit is on your left, you may choose to move closer to the kerb, but it depends on things like parked cars or the width of the road.

If there's also a car on the other side of the road coming towards you, then being on the crown is a less good idea as it puts you a bit close to that oncoming car. The answer is to steer a line midway between the two hazzards - the oncoming car and the intersection, and as your field of view is reduced on both sides, you slow down to compensate for that loss.

The next hazzard is always the one that you position for, even if that hazzard's a long way off, and you never position for the next but one. If you're on a straight road intending to take a left (assume no lights) then at a point several hundred yards before, you'll very gradually move towards the crown of the road after checking your mirror (but be prepared to move away again if there's oncoming traffic). Maybe about 100 yards aways, depending on your speed,you check your mirror again, put the indicator on, and start to slow to the speed you'll making the turn at, braking, and shifting down to keep the right gear for your speed selected as you do.

When you reach the turn, think about whether there's anything that might need a beep on th horn to make sure they know you're there, then a lifesaver (shoulder check) in the direction of the turn (no point in looking over the left shoulder then turning right), make the turn and accelerate.

That's grossly simplified of course. In the real world you move from one hazzard to another. A hazzard is anything that will cause you to alter course or speed, or has the potential to do so, so it's a continual process.

Roadcraft gives you a check list (The System of Motorcycle Control) which you can commit to memory and use all the time. You go through it on the approach to every hazzard.

It's:

Mirror, Signal, Course

Mirror Signal Speed

Gear

Mirror, Signal

Horn

Lifesaver

Maneuver and Accelerate

It's not that clear cut in real life. The only things that are compulsory in that checklist are the mirror checks - everything else is something that you must consider, but you don't actually do if you don't need to. It makes you think about your ride, all of the time. Where hazzards are thick and fast, as they usually are on the road, especially in city streets, you'll typically concatenate parts of the checklist as you move through multiple hazzards.

There are two things in there that really help. One is the horn. None of us use it enough. It just says 'I am here'. A short beep so as not to be agressive. I've posted elsewhere about loud pipes being pretty useless as a safety aid, but a loud horn really is useful. The other is the point that the lifesaver is always a look in the direction that you're going to turn. Driving on the right you'll usually look to your left, but if you're making a right turn you look right, for anything coming up the inside of you. Even if you're turning off a quiet road, there's always the possibility of a kamikazi cyclist or a kid on a moped trying to come up inside you as you slow.

This reply might be a bit confusing. I've got a set of fairly rigid guidelines that are actually applied in lots of different ways, and it's not easy to explain in words something that is fairly easy to demonstrate on the road.

Reading Motorcycle Roadcraft helps because it's got a lot of diagrams that show lines of view, and it looks at different hazzards at some length. It also explains things a lot better than I can without actually writing a book.

The research I've mentioned might change some of this, so here's another tip: Keep an open mind, keep on top of what's happening in general about motorcycle safety, and if new data shows that there's a better way to do something, be prepared to change your techniques.

Rob
 

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One situation I am always cautious about is whenever there is a cop with his lights on. Whether he is at the scene of an accident or whether it is a routine traffic stop... never pay attention to the accident/traffic stop because you can bet your sweet ass that the car drivers around you are watching it and focused on it, rather than being focused on you and the other traffic around.

The amount of times I have almost been rear-ended or side-swiped when there is a cop around is staggering.

-Pat
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #36
Avoid large trucks and buses if at all possible. Especially avoid being in front, between, or spending an extended period of time next to large trucks
Reason: because we are harder to see as it is. Trucks have poor visibility as well. No need to compound our already poor visibility with even more poor visibility.
While tragic and not the rider's fault, I believe this could have been avoided if this rider had simply not chosen such a shitty place to be, between two city buses in the middle of rush hour. Not the best place to be by any stretch of the imagination.

Lincoln Tunnel smashup: Motorcycle pinned, 3 buses crash, dozens hurt, commute snarled - Yahoo! News

Prayers go out to the injured rider
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #38
Fuck aye. Also, try to avoid tucking in behind semis and stuff at higher speeds. When they blow a tire, it could kill you.
good point, adding that in

just avoid large trucks and buses, period
 

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Fuck aye. Also, try to avoid tucking in behind semis and stuff at higher speeds. When they blow a tire, it could kill you.
Don't tuck in behind anything - it reduces your ability to see past it. We had an experienced rider on a UK forum run into the back of a truck a few weeks ago because the truck braked, and he was too close and centrally behind it and just couldn't see the dirty brakelights of the truck well enough to know that it was slowing. He had no idea that there was anything in front of the truck that might cause it to slow either, because he was poorly positioned and couldn't see past it. Only a low speed crunch fortunately. The guy was a doctor and was carted off in an ambulance to his own hospital for treatment for cuts, bruises and minor road rash. His colleagues are still taking the piss.

He was about 15 feet back at 30 mph and thought that was a safe distance.

Your reaction distance is about 2/3 of a second - that's the time it takes in the real world to realise that you need to do something, decide what you need to do, and start to do it. The guys who say they react much faster are talking through their arseholes in terms of reacting to something unexpected. That 2/3 of a second equates to 1 foot of distance for every mph of speed. If the car in front is doing 30 mph and you're 30 feet behind, when he stamps on his brakes unexpectedly you'll close that distance in the time it takes you to get on the brakes. Then if your brakes aren't at least as good as his, you've got a problem.

Stay well back from anything that you can't see over or through, and ride out towards the crown of the road in a position where you can see what's coming. The closer you get, the less you can see. Also, if you position yourself so that if you carried on up to the large vehicle you'd go alongside it rather than into the back of it, you're much less likely to become the filling in a sandwich. From this point of view, filtering can be safer than sitting in the queue as well as faster.

Beware large vehicles at intersections. If you come alongside, they can't see you. That kills a lot of cyclists every year. Bikes usually get away quickly enough, but if you stall as the lights change you could be dead.

Rob
 
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