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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #141
:Laughing rolling:i'd have to say this isnt only applicable to SS.

also, everyone should always give themselves cushion bike or car. i dont know how this is overlooked. even if youre able to react quick enough, you may not have the skill to do it properly which may cause an accident. its best to have the cushion and never have to use it imo
truth

I can see where this statement can be confusing, I know what you mean, but a newb may not.

Superior as in "Greater Than"???
Your stopping distance on a supersport bike is "greater than" that of many other cars.

Superior as in "Better or less than"
Your stopping distance on a supersport bike is "better or less than" that of many other cars.


:D
What can I say?
I no speaka engrish very good :lol:

A general comment on stopping distances.

SS bikes have great brakes, but effectively only one very small contact patch with limited grip - a lot less in less than perfect conditions - and you need a good bit of skill to get the best from your brakes.
Agreed

Most cars have 4 big fat contact patches and can outbrake the best SS bikes under most conditions. And the driver only needs to stamp on the pedal and let the ABS do the rest.

It's a mistake to believe that you can outbrake cars. Mostly, you can't. You're probably more alert and react faster, but in terms of braking distance once the brakes are applied most cars have the edge over most bikes under most conditions.
Disagreed on the bolded except in inclement weather (aka rain).

It certainly is easier for a car to get the most out of their braking, but I definitely disagree that a car has a shorter braking distance under normal conditions.

It definitely does take more skill to get the most out of your brakes on a bike (aka loading the front end as opposed to panicking and just grabbing a fistful of brake).

Also, ABS is starting to become more and more prevalent on street bikes (won't help us today, but I figure if you're in a situation where you need to brake so hard that you lose the front wheel even after properly loading it, you've fucked up already)

In terms of giving yourself a cushion, at 30 mph you're doing 44 feet per second. Reaction time from perception of a hazzard to acting is about 2/3rd of a second. THisis the real world, not a game. Do the math and you find that you need about30 feet to react at 30 mph. The equation is linear, so it's one foot of distance for every 1 mph of speed. After that you're betting on your actual braking being as good as the guy in front who'se just hit his brakes.

In practice we reckon that that 1 foot/mph is only good up to 30 mph. Past that you need to try to allow an extra yard for every 1 mph over 30. That isn't always possible, as gaps love to be filled, but if you have to leave less distance be extra careful.
True, which is why one of the tips is stay out of the center lane.
Most roads I'm on have a little bit of space on the left or right of the road.
It's in my standard emergency plans to brake into that gap if I ever find myself in such a bad situation.

I actually had it so ingrained that I instinctually tried to squeeze my last car into that tiny gap before I remembered/realized that I was in a car and wouldn't fit between the concrete barrier and the stopped car :lol:

Don't worry too much about the car behind. His brakes are plenty good enough and you can only guess about his personal reaction time. Better, usually, to be hit from behind than to hit something yourself.

Rob
100% disagree

This is obviously a personal choice between a rock and a hard place, but I'd rather take my chances in the air than pretty much guaranteed getting run over by the car that hit me from behind.
 

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Hmmmmm......

MSF:
Although motorcycles have sufficient braking power and traction to enable them to stop in as short a distance as a typical car, panic-braking a motorcycle poses unique hazards and requires greater operator skill than stopping a car in panic situations or in a skid.


So in general cars and motorcycles stop at about the same distance.

Interesting.....
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #143
Hmmmmm......

MSF:
Although motorcycles have sufficient braking power and traction to enable them to stop in as short a distance as a typical car, panic-braking a motorcycle poses unique hazards and requires greater operator skill than stopping a car in panic situations or in a skid.


So in general cars and motorcycles stop at about the same distance.

Interesting.....
I'm going to stick by my statement that SS bikes definitely have shorter braking distances than average cars.

I haven't measured anything, but from my experiences, my 675 definitely stops faster than my Honda Element (which I'd classify as a normal SUV, aka not a ferrari f430)

The MSF course deals with all motorcycles, including cruisers.
I could definitely buy that a cruiser has the same stopping distance as a normal car.
 

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"Better to be hit from behind"

Excuse me but wtf am I reading??? Better not be hit at all, as a rider I believe that I need to also worry about the soccer mom behind me yaking away on her cell phone not realizing that my bright ass brake lights are lit.

I say, more cushion for the pushin!

The fast you are going the more cushion you give. Great to have a lane to yourself with a pack of drivers far ahead and a pack FAR behind........no thanks on getting rear ended, fuck that. No bueno

riding, skydiving, sex, in that order
 

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I'm going to stick by my statement that SS bikes definitely have shorter braking distances than average cars.

I haven't measured anything, but from my experiences, my 675 definitely stops faster than my Honda Element (which I'd classify as a normal SUV, aka not a ferrari f430)

The MSF course deals with all motorcycles, including cruisers.
I could definitely buy that a cruiser has the same stopping distance as a normal car.
I agree I feel my bike will stop much faster than my Mustang GT

;)
 

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New here and stalking the site for information. Thanks for the welcome and I can't wait to ride everyday. Seeing a rainy forecast sucks. So glad to be part of a new forum. Thanks guys:)
 

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New here and stalking the site for information. Thanks for the welcome and I can't wait to ride everyday. Seeing a rainy forecast sucks. So glad to be part of a new forum. Thanks guys:)
you'll get use to rain so long as you got some waterproof gear. im starting to find it quite calming besides the water evaporating smell that pisses me off.

and it really sucks when you dont have something to wipe the visor properly.
 

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Tons of rain here in pa this spring as well. It sucks but is tolerable when it is warm enough. In keeping with the thread... Fresh rainfall brings the oils to the surface of the road making it much slippier. More so the heavier the rain. In the same regards on heavy traffic roads center and slight off center lane riding puts you in the oil drip area of cars which decreases traction significantly even on dry sunny days.

Also I am not sure if its the right thing to do but I hit black ice last December on the highway at 65 mph and I am convinced the only thing that saved me is clutching and riding it straight out as my ass end went all over the place.
 

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Staying in first

It was said to stay in first gear until the car behind you stops at a red light, I would recommend staying in first the entire red light, just holding the clutch.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Discussion Starter #150
Tons of rain here in pa this spring as well. It sucks but is tolerable when it is warm enough. In keeping with the thread... Fresh rainfall brings the oils to the surface of the road making it much slippier. More so the heavier the rain. In the same regards on heavy traffic roads center and slight off center lane riding puts you in the oil drip area of cars which decreases traction significantly even on dry sunny days.

Also I am not sure if its the right thing to do but I hit black ice last December on the highway at 65 mph and I am convinced the only thing that saved me is clutching and riding it straight out as my ass end went all over the place.
My understanding is that the initial light rain will bring oils to the surface, but once it's rained enough/hard enough for the water to start flowing on a surface, it will wash away the oil in the road.

Either ways, too lazy/headache to translate fully what you wrote

It was said to stay in first gear until the car behind you stops at a red light, I would recommend staying in first the entire red light, just holding the clutch.
That is one of the possibilities as I phrased it, or at the very least how I read it.

I do that if I'm not being lazy/the light is quick, but once the first and definitely second car have stopped behind you, I'm as safe as I'll ever be.
Of course, a tractor trailer could come barreling through, but I personally stop checking my mirrors once the first and definitely second car comes to a stop.

You can usually hear tractor trailers coming from a mile away anyways and I just naturally check on them when I hear them.
 

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Thanks for an awesome thread. I've been riding for about a year now and still concider myself a noob. Even though my riding buddies and MSF course taught me most of these tips, it never hurts to hear them again.

One thing I do when driving my truck is stay behind bikes as much as possible to kinda protect them from the common 4'10" lady in the big suv trying to send that text to her bff
 

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Feel free to chime in everyone and add to the list

Motorcycle Roadcraft (Book) (williamr)



For riders who are reading these tips, please chime in if you think some tips are a bit too basic.
It's sometimes a bit difficult to gauge what's a basic skill and what isn't especially since having ridden for so long, what seems basic to me may not be basic at all to you.
Or, just post up what you think of the tips. :)


Disclaimer: Kawiforums, I (bubbleboys), nor any other contributor to this list of tips can or will be held liable in any form for any of the tips provided within this forum thread. This list of tips is exactly that, a list of tips; you are free to choose which tips to use or not use at your own free will. Exercise caution when using these tips as some tips may not apply to you or the locale in which you ride. Every attempt is made at making this list of tips as universal as possible but it is not always possible.




Riding Techniques
  • @Intersections with a Red Light/Stop Sign
    • Stay in first gear until at least the car behind you comes to a stop (HULK)
      Reason: cagers are inattentive and will run you over if they don't notice you, which they often fail to do.
    • Place your bike somewhat in the center of the lane and angled so that it points diagonally to the left or right.
      Reason: God forbid, some car doesn't seem to think I'm there and doesn't show signs of slowing down, I'm already pointed at an escape path and don't need to worry about accelerating and then turning; I just accelerate out of the way.
      Also, by angling the bike slightly, you create a larger profile for cars to see which is always good
    • Wait for a few seconds or until one of the cars travelling in the same direction has entered the intersection after a light turns green. Then look both ways before entering the intersection (S.E.E.) before taking off.
      Reason: Cars will try to run the stop light. (Me, Limegreenninja, 03black636)
    • If a car is coming up behind you, flash your brake lights multiple times to get the driver's attention.
      Reason: To make it clear to the inattentive cagers that you are there and that they shouldn't run you over.
    • If in the left turn lane, don't go all the way to the line. Keep a car to half a car's length behind the line.
      Reason: Cars making left turns often like to cut into the left turn lane, especially if they're speeding through the left turn catching the last bit of the turn light.
    • If there is a car in the opposite direction who is going to make a left, try to veer out or place yourself so that you are visible, especially if you are behind a car. (sansfenders)
      Reason: Because of the small size of the bikes, you're likely completely blocked from view of oncoming traffic. Should minimize the likelihood of people turning into you or in front of you because they didn't see you.
    • Even if you don't have a stop sign but the intersecting road does, slow down so that you can see down the intersecting road and be able to stop in case someone runs the stop sign (cyberdos) (taken from http://www.kawiforums.com/two-wheeled-discussion/138318-commuter-safety-tips.html)
      Reason: "A friend of mine once told me that he used to ride through an intersection where he just didn't feel comfortable in. He said that although he didn't have the stop sign, he always made it a point to slow down to a crawl through the intersection. After 2 years of commuting, one day someone blew through the stop and he nearly t-boned them. Those 2 years of precaution through there paid dividends that day."
  • Braking
    • At low speeds (sub 5-10 mph), avoid using your front brakes.
      Reason: at low speeds, the weight transfer effect on the front wheel is negligible. As such, there is no benefit to using your front brake at such low speeds.
      However, if you lose your front wheel traction, you're more than likely won't recover. Recovering from a loss of rear wheel traction is much simpler and very "easy" to do so once your reflexes have come in. (williamr)
    • Start with most of the braking power on the front brakes. As your speed decreases to a stop, shift the braking power from the front to the rear brake. For the last 5-10 meters of braking, you should be on the rear brake only.
      Reason: I've always done this just because I liked a smooth ride but there are safety benefits to this as well.
      If you've ever driven on a low traction surface (aka winter and icy roads) in a car, you know that slowing down isn't the real problem; stopping completely is the big problem. With mild and controlled braking, your wheels will not lock up when slowing down from a high speed but are pretty much guaranteed to lock up with the same pressure on the brakes in the last 15mph of braking. Your experiences might be slightly different, maybe all the cars I've driven are the exception but this has been my experience for the par.
      Carried over, expect that you will have low traction the last bit of braking. If you lose your traction on the front wheel, you're pretty much screwed. Lost rear wheel traction is fairly easy to recover from.
Riding Techniques (continued)
Road Hazards
Street Tricks

Continued here
I appreciate these tips. I just started back riding after a 5 year hiatus and I say and practice these tips everytime I ride. These tips are not basic at all. I believe (especially) when you've been riding awhile some of the basic tips you learned when you first started riding are not practiced as much.
 

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Hey I am just introducing myself. I do not have a bike yet but I plan on getting a 2013 ninja 650. Good luck to all the new riders out there and for other newbies like me. Welcome to the fourum.
 

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Never thought about angling the bike when stopped at a light so as to be prepared for a speedy exit if required. Thank you for that.
 

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Cornering tip:

understanding what vanishing points are and master reading them! im tired of losing bikers in corners because they mis-read how sharp a corner was before they entered it. The 1st bikers commandment: Tho shall know thee vanishing point will leadth thee to safe corner exits.
 

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Awesome advice. I like the placing of the bike to create an escape route and I didnt know about only using the back brakes on slow stops.

cheers!
 
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