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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some Advice on installing porcelain tiles. i am completely remodeling a kitchen right now i am at bare walls and sub-floor i believe they are 1inx8inx10ft ceder boards on top of joists but i will have to confirm (early 60's construction).

So my plan to go forward is to put screws into the boards to secure them and stop any squeaks, then some-type of paper mat/vapor barrier, then a 1/4" plywood on that screw it down well, install a radiant heat floor mat staple it to the plywood, then put down a primer for quick level concrete, then pour out quick level concrete over mat, then thin-set on-top of the quick level and lay tiles grout etc. anybody have advice on this like proper materials or size/type of plywood im pretty new to construction and just watching as many vids and reading as many write-ups as i can find.


Basically building up:
Sub-floor - paper/tar mat - 1/4 plywood - heat mat - Quick level - thin-set and tiles
 

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I did a similar project a few years back. The main thing here is the flex, I can't recall if we bothered with plywood as the previous subfloor was quite thick. BlackDog is right on the money about the plywood, you want to make sure that floor flexes as little as possible. Around here, we get tiles on the walls cracking from the regular earthquakes, and I can only imagine how bad it would be for floor tiles that aren't secured to a completely stable subfloor.

The process you're describing sounds very familiar. But, I last did this a few years ago, so I don't recall all the details. One thing to be mindful of though, is that the wires are rather delicate and the testing is as well. You want to make sure you've got good contact on the probes. As I recall, getting a consistent reading took a little bit of practice. Unfortunately, I can't recall what the specific problem was.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys ill do some more research before i head into this, I've been told a level quick underlayment is to risky on such a large area because it takes too long to mix and pour and may not level correctly. so i think ill look into a 1/2 to 3/4" plywood and a 1/4 to 1/2 of backer-board and thin-set ontop of the heat mat being watchful of the electric lines.
 
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