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I read in here a couple times about people removing a "baffle". Whats that? Is that the same as guttig the can? Can someone post pics of it? I heard it makes the exhaust sound better and is less restrictive without it. So that means more HP right?
 

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lol thanks for throwing me into the mix freebird. actually i dont mind talking about it at all but i cant really supply pics right now as i am still in the stone age and dont have a digital camera. there are others on here that have done the same thing as that is where i got the idea. a few things first before i go into the details though. first, you will need to do some carb tuning after doing this. second, be prepared to break a sweat, it isnt mechanically challenging but it does require some physical effort. third, this is unreversible so once you are done if you ever decide to go back stock you will need to find another can. also, you can tune the sound level by deciding how many baffles to retain. i kept 1 and the sound level is comparable to a moderately loud aftermarket pipe but not as loud as say a d&d. basically you are gutting the can and hacking the insides to pieces. the power gains i am unsure of as i only have the butt dyno to go by but i mostly did it for the sound as i am saving for a full exhaust. ok now on to the details.
the tools required are inexpensive and the only parts you need are some 3/16 rivets. you will need a small punch or something to tap the centers out of the existing rivets on the outside of the can, 12mm & 14mm socket or wrench, 17mm open ended wrench, hammer, some type of narrow flat blade to scrape sealant out of a small crevice with ( i used a flat blade screwdriver but it was time consuming compared to a small pick or such), and about 2 feet of something to pound the guts out of the can with ( i used 1/2 inch extensions , a hacksaw with some good metal cutting blades, a rivet gun, and of course a drill with a 3/16 bit. this can be a little time consuming but it is nearly free so thats the tradeoff. now i am sure somebody has a more refined method than this but i was learning as i went. the first part can be done with the can on the bike or removed but i was doing this in my storage unit with no bench so i left the can on for it. the 12mm, 14mm, and 17 mm sockets and/or wrenches are for removing the can only so that is where you would use them. first start by tapping the centers out of the 3 rivets holding the end of the can on and then drill out the rivets. next you need to remove the end cap and this is tricky because there is some sealant holding it on the can and keep in mind it is aluminum and very easy to dent or scratch. i took the handle of my hammer and lightly started tapping inward on the end can to free it up and once it was free i grabbed the spout on the cap and wiggled the cap out. it takes a little muscle and patience but it will come. once you have removed the endcap you can see the steel guts and that they are sealed into the can with some gray sealant. it will take some time but take something and begin scraping the sealant out of the gap until you can actually see the gap. the more you scrape out the easier it will be to break the guts free from the shell so take your time. if you have left the can on your bike up until this point now is the time to remove it. there are 3 12mm nuts holding it to the pipe and the 14mm nut holding it to the rear peg. the 17mm wrench is for the bolt that goes through the back to keep it from turning. now is time to stick something into the inlet end of the can and beat the guts out of the back. since i didnt have a table or anything i simply set the extensions on the end and slid the can over them and pounded the can up and down until the guts started coming out. once you have the guts out you will see that they are wrapped in fiberglass matting and this needs to be removed. if you want you can use it soe if you plan on it then be gentle in taking it off. i opted not to reuse it. now you can see the internals of the baffles and how they work. from there just decide where you want to saw it off and start hacking away. i basically sawed mine just past the opening of the first baffle. once you are done hacking it up then slide it back into the can and line the studs up with the holes in the can. now reinstall the end cap carefully making sure to line up the rivet holes and install some new rivets. next reinstall the can and fire it up. like i said before, this is not reversible, you will have a small flatspot at lower rpms, and the noise level is dependent on how much you cut off. the driveability was ok before i tuned my carbs, but after i shimmed the needles it is as smooth as stock over 2k rpms. hope this answers your questions
 

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well I have alot of experience 30+yrs.. but not in the baffle area, and I never give advice unless I know my stuff.. you r the man. thanks
 

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well thanks but im hardly the man. i was just brave or stupid enough to try it (probably the latter). but i know where you r coming from though. i still tend to want to give advice on things im not 100% sure about and sometimes end up sticking my foot in my mouth. but i have been getting better with age though.........
 

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well said. I never give advice unless im sure. thats why were here right, to learn and help others. No better feeling than helping someone else.
 

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carb tuning refers to having your carbs(4) of them set to be in sync so they flow a matched amount of fuel to the (4) cylinders. You can add larger jets in the carbs (jet kit) to add more fuel flow and performance.
 
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