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One more that wins for rarity- only 10 were built in the early 1990s, they cost $150,000 each new and would probably cost over a million each now, if one was ever for sale. They won several races. Only the one at the Barber Vintage Motorsports museum in Alabama is rode regularly.

The builder borrowed carbon fiber technology from sailboat racing, and airflow design from Formula 1 car racing. The V-twin engine revs to 12,000 rpm, with the unique spaghetti exhaust designed by Britten, a mechanical engineer and a glass artist in New Zealand, 4 pipes for the 4 exhaust valves:
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ED8A4iQ77Ek
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ezwrs5rIlo
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Not as rare as the Britten, but worth a lot more now, from Wikipedia:



39 Ferrari 250 GTOs were manufactured between 1962 and 1964.



In 2004, Sports Car International placed the 250 GTO eighth on a list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s.



Motor Trend Classic placed the 250 GTO first on a list of the "Greatest Ferraris of All Time".



The development of the 250 GTO was headed by chief engineer Giotto Bizzarrini. He and most other Ferrari engineers were fired in 1962 due to a dispute with Enzo Ferrari. Further development of the 250 GTO was overseen by new engineer Mauro Forghieri, who worked with Scaglietti to continue development of the body. The design of the car was a collaborative effort and cannot be ascribed to a single person.




The mechanical aspects of 250 GTO were relatively conservative at the time of its introduction, using engine and chassis components that were proven in earlier competition cars. The engine was the Tipo 168/62 Comp. 3.0 L V12 as used in the 250 Testa Rossa. This engine was an all-alloy design utilizing a dry sump and six 38DCN Weber carburetors. It produced approximately 300 horsepower and was very reliable, proved by previous competition experience with the Testa Rossa. The gearbox was a new 5-speed unit with Porsche-type synchromesh.




The body design was from wind tunnel testing at Pisa University as well as road and track testing with several prototype cars. The aerodynamic design of the 250 GTO was a major technical innovation compared to previous Ferrari GT cars, and in line with contemporary developments by manufacturers such as Lotus.




FIA regulations as they applied in 1962 required at least one hundred examples of a car to be built in order for it to be homologated for Group 3 Grand Touring Car racing. However, Ferrari built only 39 250 GTOs. Ferrari eluded FIA regulations by numbering its chassis out of sequence, using jumps between each to suggest cars that didn't exist.




The car debuted at the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1962, driven by American Phil Hill (the Formula One World Driving Champion at the time) and Belgian Olivier Gendebien. Although originally annoyed that they were driving a GT-class car instead of one of the full-race Testa Rossas competing in the prototype class, the experienced pair impressed themselves (and everyone else) by finishing 2nd overall behind the Testa Rossa of Bonnier and Scarfiotti.




Ferrari would go on to win the over 2000cc class of the FIA's International Championship for GT Manufacturers in 1962, 1963 and 1964, with the 250 GTO being raced in each of those years.




The 250 GTO was one of the last front-engined cars to remain competitive at the top level of sports car racing.




A 250 GTO (4757GT) seized by the FBI belonging to the deceased Robert C. "Chris" Murray, a drug dealer who fled the United States in 1984, was sold in a sealed auction in 1987 for approximately $1.6 million.




In 1989 a 250 GTO was sold to a Japanese buyer for $14.6 million plus commission. By 1994 that example changed hands for about $3.5 million.




In 2008, a British buyer bought a 250 GTO that formerly belonged to Lee Kun-hee of Samsung Electronics at an auction for a record £15.7 million.




In May 2010, BBC Radio 2 DJ Chris Evans bought chassis number 4675 GT for £12 million.




In February 2012, in what is believed to be the largest single car transaction in the United Kingdom, a Ferrari 250 GTO sold for over £20 million (approx. US $31.7 million).




In May 2012 the 1962 250 GTO made for Stirling Moss became the world's most expensive car, selling in a private transaction for $35 million to American communications magnate Craig McCaw.




In October 2013, Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo sold chassis number 5111GT to an unnamed buyer for a new record of $52 Million.




The price when new for the Ferrari 250 GTO in US dollars is $18,500 (not adjusted for inflation).
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