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got a 2001 zx6r with a slightly bent frame. it was hit head on from the front and the forks were pushed a little closer to the engine like the frame was raked in as opposed to out. so when you look at the kawasaki emblem on the right side of the frame you can feel that the label is a little pushed out as opposed to being flush with the frame. anyone know from the sound of this if this is fixable or how much i would be looking at to get a frame straightened out. i don't know much about bike repair but the bike rides fine, no wobbling at high speeds, just wondering if it would be cost effective to fix it or if i should just leave it the way it is. thanks.
 

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Heh, you've probably got one of the quicker steering 6R's out there. As for straightening the frame itself, check out www.gmdcomputrack.com More often than not, even frames that come brand new from the factory are slightly out of shape.
 

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Computrack’s a great thing. They seem to have branches around the U.S.: I know at least one in the SF Bay Area. Rocket science not so long ago, now reality.

Frames still come from the factory slightly off. I assume that’s due to manufacturing tolerances, tightening everything on assembly, and other factors. Most riders are none the wiser. Problems often only manifest under extreme conditions (racing).

I know a guy who sent his Gixxer 1000 to Computrack somewhere near Virginia after a mild wreck. The bike wasn’t quite right after the wreck, though it took awhile to puzzle out the problem. Computrack fixed the issue with a little hydraulic bending. Cost wasn’t bad, though like most everything motorcycle-related it wasn’t cheap, either. Nor should it be: craftsmanship and technology cost money. I believe he paid about $1,200 total. Insurance covered most, since the issue occurred due to his wreck.

In Tacoma, WA there’s a frame-straightening guy who uses less advanced methods (a more-advanced very large hammer?). He fixes racebikes with decent success, at good prices. Presumably there’s a guy like that near every town with an amateur race club: bikes suffer bent frames all the time in that situation, unf.

I’d spend the money and have the number checked on the bike in question, personally. If the forks are really “pushed in” something’s very much not right, a problem that’ll manifest at an inopportune time (like a 100mph sweeper, perhaps). Tank-slappers (or worse) are not a good thing.

Or, like the guy said: it may behave just the same, as far as he can tell. You pays your money and takes your chances.

-=DRB=-
 

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i think ive got the same problem. i have less wheelbase than my frieds 6r. ive inspected the frame and see no stress marks. after asking alot of people, all have said that it is the lower triple clamp that is actually pushing the forks closer into the bike. mine suffered an accident but i dont know the details it was just messed up when i bought it. dont let this go, it will throw you a tankslapper, trust me i know the hard way. i would have the tubes straightened right away. you can do that at any machine shop for 20 bucks. then use an angle finder on you lower triple(take off first). my bike also has a dent on the right side of the frame but all lines match up and the plate you talk about is not warped. ill post back at 6pm after ive installed the new triple clamp and head bearings to let you know how that worked out. maybe its cheaper to fix thatn you think.
 
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