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Discussion Starter #1
did a little search but came up with nothing.

things I know: Braided brake lines add stopping power (good thing)

I don't knwo: how they do this???

can somebody please explain the technology/implementation of this stuff. how does it work? I was checking online didn't see anything about how it works. even looked on "how stuff works" dot com and nada about braided lines.

???????
 

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Braided lines don't expand as much as rubber lines, thus more pressure at the calipers. Check out one of the manufacturers sites they explain it there.
 

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Conventional rubber brakelines tend to expand (in diameter) when pressure is exerted on them from the inside by the fluid, especially when the fluid starts to get hot from repetetive stopping.

Braided hoses circumvent this by use of a steel braid around the inner rubber hose that limits the expansion, therefore creating more precise and consistent braking performance.

EDIT: Damn, guess I took too long to type that out!
 

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when you brake a lot and things heat up the stock components (rubber) expand giving less stopping power. Steel braided lines don't expand as much (or at all) so they give you more stopping power and less brake "fade". I heard somewhere they give you 50% more stopping power but I can't back that claim up. Do a search for "SS Lines", galfer and goodridge are the most popular (I recently purchased Goodridge lines).
 

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Man you guys type too slow.Haha. Yeah on the Goodridge site they say it's 66% less expansion. This is what I'm going to do 'cause one good stunting session and my brake are shit. Now if I squeeze hard, the lever will touch the handle. I bled them out with MOTUL 5.1 and it helped a little, but I think I already expanded the lines too much. I know that it was a complaint before that the brakes felt 'wooden' or squishy, apparently they fixed it on the '06 because the Master Bike comp the said the new 10 had some of the best brakes out there.

If you do a search on brakes someone gave me a good suggestion on how to get better feel, it was something one of the mechanics told him at a track day. I'm deffinatly doing it when I get the new lines.
 

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Did he say 5.1 he was using?
If that is the synthetic stuff, well you go with your bad self.
NOT RECOMMENDED but for Harleys and a few BMW's.

Has something to do with the fluid as it holds water easier then conventional fluid, meaning squishy brakes.

If you have a 10R add some braided lines, and if that enough get a radial master cylinder (brembo) as well that will more than fix you up.
 

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DOT 5.1 is compatible with DOT 4, it has a higher boiling point i believe. DOT 5.1 was recommended to me by my local shop
 

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DOT 3, 4 and 5.1 are all organic fluids ans completely compatible.
DOT 5 is a silicone based fluid and NOT compatible with organic fluids.
 

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I think your thinking of 5.0 that is silicone base. 3,4, and 5.1 are all synthetic and non-silicone based. There has been a question of them getting polluted with water and moisture. Out here we never have moisture, something like less than 2 inches of rain a year. I've also heard Motul 600 is real good.
Originally posted by jdgun_13
Did he say 5.1 he was using?
If that is the synthetic stuff, well you go with your bad self.
NOT RECOMMENDED but for Harleys and a few BMW's.

Has something to do with the fluid as it holds water easier then conventional fluid, meaning squishy brakes.

If you have a 10R add some braided lines, and if that enough get a radial master cylinder (brembo) as well that will more than fix you up.
 

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Motul RBF is the way to go (higher boiling point than 5.1).

Lets get one thing straight... There is absolutely NOTHING wrong with using DOT 5 instead of DOT 3, 4, or 5.1. The reason people are told NOT to use DOT 5 is that it is incompatible with the other DOT brake fluids. If they ever are introduced to one another, they turn to sledge and will result in you having to replace your entire brake system... hoses, master cylinder, calipers, all the seals, etc....

BTW, dot 5 fluid is non-hydroscopic... meaning it can sit on your shelf as long as you want since it does NOT absorb moisture, unlike any other DOT brake fluid.

All in all, it is a superior fluid, but is not recommended due to the fact that it has to be used from day 1, unless you want to change out all your brake system components just to switch to using it.
 

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Don't forget a sweatband on your resevoir... :D:D:D
 
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