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Discussion Starter #1
I know some of you have done one. It's a winter project of mine, I'm going with Galfer SS (gets rid of the junction box, right?). I assume since your removing the banjo bolts that you need to drain all fluid (sorry if thats sounds squid) -- is it really necessary to use a vaccuum-type bleeder to eliminate air, or can I just pick up some speed bleeders? Routing the lines SEEMS pretty easy, how hard was the entire project? How long did it take? thanks!
 

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First some warnings. Brake fluid will ruin your paint and other surfaces. If you spill any on the bike, wash it off with soap and water immediately. These are your brakes. If they fail you could seriously injure yourself. If you are not 100% comfortable installing the lines and bleeding them properly, get someone to help you. A vacuum bleeder is not required, but it will make the job easier.

I installed Galfer brakes lines on my 636. Braided brake lines are usually the first mod I do on all new bikes. They help the brake feel tremendously.

It takes about an hour to install front and rear. Here's the basic steps to change the fronts, the rear is a single line and is much simpler:

  • Drain the brake fluid from the system (a vacuum bleeder makes this easy, but is not necessary)
  • Remove the stock brake lines
  • Put the banjo bolt through the brake lines and finger tighten the bolt to the master cylinder. 3 washers are needed on this bolt. Install a washer on the bolt, then line 1, then a washer, then line 2, then a washer.
  • Route the lines to the brake calibers and finger tighten the banjo bolts to the calibers.
  • Make sure all lines are routed properly and do not interfere with steering or rub on anything that may damage them over time. You may need to rotatte the lines on the master cylinder banjo bolt to accomplish this.
  • Tighten the banjo bolts to the manufuacturers specs. These are aluminum bolts and are torqued to a much lower spec than the stock steel bolts. Read the Galfer instructions to find the torque and use a torque wrench.
  • Bleed the system.
 

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Each Galfer line runs from the master cylinder straight to a caliper.

I like speed bleeders, but the lines will not have enough pressure to start bleeding with just them. A vacuum pump works wonders, and you can use it to drain the stock lines.

Before installing the lines, you can use an eye dropper to get brake fluid from one end of each line to the other, which helps to start the bleeding.

After you install the lines, use a bit of toilet paper around each banjo bolt, and then tie the brake lever to the bar for a bit. If a a leak starts at a banjo bolt, tighten it another ft·lb, and repeat until the leak stops. You will want to use a torque wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the replies -- it seems a vacuum bleeder would be worthwhile for installs. And although I am aware of the corrosive factors in brake fluid, thank you for warning those who may not be. When I do the install, which will not be for a couple months (thanks to ol' man winter :() I will take pics in details.
 

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to anyone who's done it, is it really worth while to install ss brake lines on the rear? i mean do experience any fade or anything in the rear? just curious because i am installing just the fronts, i didnt think the rears would be a big deal but maybe i will get em now...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
HOLY SHIT! I just looked at prices of vacuum bleeders, and are they really $150-300?? That's just as much as the f***ing brake lines. Anybody know where I can get the Walmart version??
 

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Discussion Starter #13
no, no, no... $135 for the front and $57 for the back (yeah, I want the "blingalicious"). But I couldn't see paying $300 for a vacuum bleeder.
 

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Originally posted by t15_roberts
I know some of you have done one. It's a winter project of mine, I'm going with Galfer SS (gets rid of the junction box, right?). I assume since your removing the banjo bolts that you need to drain all fluid (sorry if thats sounds squid) -- is it really necessary to use a vaccuum-type bleeder to eliminate air, or can I just pick up some speed bleeders? Routing the lines SEEMS pretty easy, how hard was the entire project? How long did it take? thanks!
That's exactly what I have, SS Galfers and I used Speed Bleeders too. And to Spartan, yes they do improve the brakes. You really notice at the track IMO. I was able to improve laptimes under breaking for sure with those installed. I never use the rear brake, so I didn't bother with those. Click here for some pics...
http://kawiforums.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4173
 

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Originally posted by spartan 116
yes..but HOW?
How what? How do you install them? Well, I think it's beyond the scope of a "reply" myself. If you're not sure just bring the parts to a shop and get them to do it. Or search around here (and the net), someone may have taken time time to explain it and taken pics (not that I recall seeing on here). One thing I wouldn't mess with if you're not experienced in it, is brakes. Too important to screw up...and ya might not realize something's not quite right until it's too late. It wouldn't take long for a shop to install em, and maybe ya can watch them do it. Look at the pics in my other post and if you don't think it's easy don't try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
spartan -- regular OEM plastic brake lines swell under pressure when the brake fluid heats (ie: when you grab the brake) -- this robs the claiper of brake pressure and increases stopping time. An increase in stopping time means you need to grab the brake earlier in a turn, slowing you down. Steel (or kevlar) braided brake lines are metal and they do not swell under pressure. They provided a more positive response to the caliper and more linear feel at the lever. If you switch though, be careful at first -- you don't want to grab TOO much brake if you're used to OEM lines, and bring up the rear [xx(]
 

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Personally, I don't agree with draining the brrake system before removing the lines. If you drain the MC, you are going to have a bitch of a time getting pressure started back up in the system.

What I recommend doing is buying a syringe, or something that can let you fill the newly installed brake lines up directly after you install them on the bike (ie remove old brake lines from mc, lower line down and drain fluid out of line, disconnect line from caliper to center brake splitter thing one at a time, lower hose and drain fluid, install SS lines to the calipers, route them up through the forks to the MC, use syringe to fill lines with fresh fluid, connect lines to MC) and then bleed the brakes. As long as you don't squeeze the brake lever with the lines off the MC, it shouldn't get air into it, unless it's seals are shot.

BC.
 
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