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I've never found a need to replace the rotors. As long as you replace your pads before the rivets dig into your rotors, you should be ok.
 

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Meangreenie is right, why do you think you need to replace the rotors?
If your pads aren't digging in, then you should be ok. Unless you do a bunch of stoppies, which might heat them up enough to warp them.

If you do replace them, go with some aftermarkets. Pony up the cash on good equipment and it will save you in the long run.
 

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I don't know...it feels like the bike doesn't stop that well...but it could be my imagination. My friend has an R6 and he says the same thing about his...but could be that i'm so used to the braking power now that I think it's not performing right. Kind of like driving a Porsche...thinking it's fast at first but then thinking it's not so fast anymore now that you drive it all the time.
I ride normally...don't do stoppies or track days.

Thanks,

Mark
 

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At what miles do you usually need to change the brake rotors? And why the f**k are they so expensive [V]. Do those that have replaced them...go with stock rotors or aftermarket?

Thanks,

Mark
 

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The rotors will usually outlast the bike.
UNLESS...

you warp them from doing too many endos, or if you dont replace your pads in time and over time they cut into the rotors.

I would first check your cables and the setting on the brake lever if all is ok, replace your pads and/or change your brake fluid.
 

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I would check for air in the line. That will feel like decreased power too. Do a bleed at the top first. Also new pads might be in order. If you plan on replacing the fluid I would put stainless lines on.
 

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Inspect the lines for any cracks or damage. If you do see any damage or cracks replace the brake line, your brake lines may be getting a little old and tired (may be). Try bleeding your brakes to remove any air that may be in your lines.

On the rotor or disc you should find a minimum width figure (4.5mm for my 2000 ZX6R Australian model), if your disc is thinner than this measurement you will need to replace your disc. Check this thickness using some calipers, also inspect the disc surface for damage. If there are scrap marks around your rotor/disc replace them both and the pads too.
If you do replace your rotors/discs make sure you replace your pads AT THE SAME TIME, it is important.


Try braided brake lines to eliminate any soft or shitty feeling brakes. I am told they are well worth the investment.

Who here has tried them?
 

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I've been thinking that the brakes on my 1998 are getting soft too. I'm not sure if its cause i've been riding this bike for a while and i'm so used to it.
I'm going to bleed the brake fluid this week, i'll let you know if it makes a differance.
 

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Tokico 6 pots when new are very good calipers,the reasons for them going off are
1) Old fluid - Change once a year
2) Air in the system - Bleed them, see my other thread about back bleeding
3) Sticking pistons in the calipers - common cause
4) Old Rubber hoses 3 years old and they go off - will make a difference but not a massive one
5) Master cylinder problems (less common)
6) Rotor warpage, it does happen and can be exagerated by sticking calipers - caused by the small buttons which the rotors 'float' on being too small and not being able to dissipate the heat generated under heavy braking
 

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So long as they're within tolerances, you needn't replace your rotors. Granted, if you are outside of the recommended limits, look into getting some EBC rotors or summat like that. Stay away from ductile-iron discs as they do offer superior stopping power, but only within a narrow temperature margin, usually closer to racing speeds and frequence of use. You'll probably never get them hot enough to use their full power. Whereas steel discs offer a little less stopping power but over a much MUCH broader temperature range, which is good for you street riders out there.

Also, don't forget to match the appropriate pads to your particular discs. If you stick with the stockers or get aftermarket steel discs, you'll want to use sintered-metal pads. With ductile-iron discs you'll want to use organic pads.

As for the cost issue, think about it; those pads rubbing againts discs constantly heating up and cooling off, it's a miracle they don't warp! The materials used to fabricate our wonderful stoppers are chosen carefully for these and other properties as well. Be glad we live in an age when it's possible not only to loop out of the seat on the gas at 80 but also to loop over the bars with a good two-fingered squeeze of the anchors!
 
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