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RSV is where I got my rear sets from they arrived a little later than first estimated but they’re a good honest vendor. Quality is pretty good.
In order to use these(they make a 100mm version as well)
You’ll need a pair of callipers, and I recommend changing the master cylinder to match callipers as well to retain stock levels of performance.
You can often find sets from older sport bikes at wreckers on line with master, lines and callipers included
Good callipers to upgrade to are anything from japanese sport bikes zx10, r1 gsxr, etc
They also make an upside down hanger for brembo racing rear caliper so if you want to match front and back, you can
If you buy used it might be wise to factor in pads, seals/calliper rebuild kit as well.

rule of thumb
European bikes have 100mm radial callipers(spacing between the bolts. Japanese use 108 spacing. Stay away from the r1 six piston callipers they will only fit r1 forks.

you may also need to space the callipers out to fit the disks you have as all forks and callipers are a little different in that respect

if you need to space the callipers you may also need longer bolts to suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Addendum to my previous impressions after my 3300+kms road trip. The rear SBS pad really shined and retained all the positive attributes mentioned above. The attitude over distance and under max weight load was extremely stable and the only natural change was pedal modulation (as was lever modulation for the front brake). The stabilizing effect and locking limit threshold were even better and crisper with the extra weight on the rear. No warm up needed – zero noise. Really enjoyed using the rear brake for the duration of my trip.

I also had the chance to form a more complete opinion about the front Sinter Evo pads. They really shined over their Brembo predecessors during highway braking with the front tire fully loaded by weight and momentum. In Italy this kind of braking was quite frequent as they tend to service parts of their highways by leaving one lane open to traffic thus I often had to brake from 140kmh / 90mph to around 70kmh / 45mph in order to fold in line and follow the single line for about 3kms before exiting and accelerating to normal highway speeds again.
Initially I had to release the front brake lever as I was getting more stopping power than I expected while still getting that nice linear feeling instead of a vague, wooden sensation. I could also feather the front brake while rolling down steep alleys paved with shiny, ultra slippery cobblestones and even fine gravel, conditions where front brake usage is usually a big no-no. The brake feel was so crisp that I even intentionally tested the locking limit of the front, so very impressive indeed.
As always keep in mind that the improvements in feel were within the effective braking range dictated by the oem brake pump and master cylinder of my bike – so don’t expect miracles but tangible great improvement.

I can only say once more that on a bike with basic braking hardware like the Er these pads are a real upgrade and worth every cent of their price, which is rather good for premium items anyway (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Nice video about brake upgrades with a Versys as an example of a bike with shoddy brakes :p

Man is our hardware (in)famous or what!


Never thought about scrubbing the discs with brake cleaner and scotch pad before installing new pads, seems to make sense and speed up the bedding procedure.
 

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Nice video about brake upgrades with a Versys as an example of a bike with shoddy brakes :p

Man is our hardware (in)famous or what!


Never thought about scrubbing the discs with brake cleaner and scotch pad before installing new pads, seems to make sense and speed up the bedding procedure.
Watched that video haha, might even find my comment on there.
 
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