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Anybody know how much brake fluid the front and back brakes take? I am buying some DOT 5.1 brake fluid for when I convert the standard lines over to steel and I can't find anywhere where it says how many mL of fluid they take. I need to know how many bottles to buy and at $13.50/bottle I can't just buy a few extra. Also, should I replace the brake pads when I do this? After 8000 miles I would think they need to be replaced but I figured I'd bounce it off the forum first
 

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Just curious why you would want to use something like the DOT 5.1 when the DOT 4 stuff works just fine and you will not be able to tell any difference. Also, you can get DOT 4 stuff anywhere while the DOT 5.1 stuff is just beginnig to show up. A quart of either will last you a long time. Look at the pads. If the lining material is as thin as a dime it is time to replace them.

I just bought front and rear Goodridge lines off eBay for $78 delivered. The joys of having and old bike!
 

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i just changed my brake fluid today using valvoline dot 4 in a 354ml bottle, i didn't even use half that amount for a total change im sure a small bottle will be enough if your carefull! by the way its good to get a helping hand for the front left and the rear brake hard to jumple a wrench and pull the brake in when you cant reach....(thanks brent).....

later!

off like a prom dress!
 

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If you do not have any problems bleeding the brake lines, you will be able to change the front and rear brake fluid using a 12-ounce bottle.

You do not need to replace the brake pads if their lining thickness is greater than the 1-mm service limit. If the lining thickness of either pad in a caliper is less than the service limit, replace both pads in the caliper as a set.

DOT 5.1 brake fluid has a higher boiling point than DOT 4 fluid, which reduces the risk of fluid vaporization and possible brake failure. Although this is important to racers, you may like DOT 4 fluid just fine on the street.

DOT 5.1 fluid should not be confused with DOT 5 fluid. DOT 5 fluid is silicone-based and not compatible with DOT 4 fluid. DOT 5.1 fluid, on the other hand, is glycol-based and compatible with DOT 4 fluid.

Edited by - Rob Lee on 11/17/2002 13:18:28
 
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