Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I just bought a 07 ZX6R. I have 53 miles on it and am breaking it in by riding it hard to fully seal the piston rings....I have been told this was better than breaking it in easy. How high should I get the RPM's in the first, second, and third gears to follow the rough break in method.

PS- I did some searching
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,630 Posts
Just ride it the way you normally would. No worries. Just make sure you change that oil at, or before you are supposed to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,690 Posts
Don't gun the engine. Gradually build up the rpm's to redline. Whatever you do, don't have it in a high gear (under 6k rpm) and gun it. That's just terrible on the engine. There's various opinions on how a bike should be broken in. I broke the zx6r using the kawi method of not going over 6k rpm and the daytona I let the revs build to the redline and constantly shifted to change rpms. Never keep it at the same rpm for a long period of time. Either way, neither bike has a problem. So do whatever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Break in

The first thing I did on mine is change the oil. You have an 07 so it probably has old oil in it, and may have lost some lubricating qualities.


Ride like you normally would. However,
When riding, don't super load the engine. I mean as in trying to go up a long hill with a passanger, at full throttle at high speeds. Also NEVER keep rpm's at a fixed point. Keep either accelerating or decelerating, always with the tach needle moving. Learn to rev match on downshifts for smoothness.

Don't sit in the driveway reving the engine at high RPM with no load, It's very rare but possible to damage the engine, and the damage will be $evere!

Hold off on swithing to semi or full synthetic oil until 2-3K miles. Synthetic lubricates too well and may not allow key components to seat properly.

As for oil changes I did:
1. got the bike home.
2. at 600 mi
3. at 1500 mi
4. at 2700 mi (now with amsoil)


Also be aware to inspect the opening on the left side faring regularly. Some early build dates from 07 have an issue with oil leaking from the valve cover. This can develop at any mileage, and sometimes requires multiple trips to correct.

Welcome to the club!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,247 Posts
Hey guys I just bought a 07 ZX6R. I have 53 miles on it and am breaking it in by riding it hard to fully seal the piston rings....I have been told this was better than breaking it in easy. How high should I get the RPM's in the first, second, and third gears to follow the rough break in method.

PS- I did some searching

is this your first M o t o r c y c l e?

and WHERE are you breaking in your the Z X 6 R.

are you wearing your HELMET?

do you have a Jacket, Gloves, Boots, and Jeans?

have you taken the Motorcycle Safety Class?

do you still have chicken strips?

:)

Welcome to the club!


Snoopy? ,.................and .............................Schroeder?
http://cgi.ebay.com/Snoopy-Peanuts-...em?IMSfp=TL08080411101r16775#ebayphotohosting
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
ill tell you this much...
i broke mine in like i stole it. my friend babied his same exact bike color and all. his is geared and mine is still faster with stock gearing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
ill tell you this much...
i broke mine in like i stole it. my friend babied his same exact bike color and all. his is geared and mine is still faster with stock gearing.
Highly doubt this is due to break in process...
More than likely, it is due to rider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Highly doubt this is due to break in process...
More than likely, it is due to rider.
Actually, there has been cases where they did a side-by-side comparison of the two break in methods and the hard break in always performed better (as in stronger motor). I forget where I saw this, but if i find it I'll post it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
Actually, there has been cases where they did a side-by-side comparison of the two break in methods and the hard break in always performed better (as in stronger motor). I forget where I saw this, but if i find it I'll post it.
Please do post if you find it.

Sure, there maybe some difference (negligible) in performance between break-in styles, but not enough to beat another similar vehicle with less front teeth, more rear teeth sprockets...unless you are talking top end speed.
I still say this is more of a driver issue, or that bike has something else wrong with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
First off, thanks a lot for the input guys. I thought there would be a lot more flaming at me for being a ignorent n0obl3t!

Blackdog, I have been riding bikes all my life. My dad never believed in ATV's so I always had to settle with our bikes. I used to think ATV's were cool, but now that I am getting more into bikes I'm glad I never had an ATV. Yes I am finally legal to drive on the road. I have a helmet and all the safety gear. This whole chicken strip business...I see that written too often on the forum here. Does that refer to a bike having only a dirt strip in the middle of the tire from not leaning? If so, my strip doesn't reach to the ends of the tire but about 1"....I lean it somewhat.

I know just asking this question would arise some of the n0ob flaming, but that's alright. I am a n0ob when it comes to breaking a bike in.

So as someone stated, I asked this question because I want this bike to be broken in hard because I too have heard that the hard-break-in bikes are stronger. When you guys say "read-lining" do you mean the red line on the tach? That can't be.

Steakneggs what did you mean by "rev-matching on downshift"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
Alot of people swear by the Motoman break-in method...

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Here's a cut/paste from the site:
On the Street:
Warm the engine up completely:
Because of the wind resistance, you don't need to use higher gears like you would on a dyno machine. The main thing is to load the engine by opening the throttle hard in 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear.

Realistically, you won't be able to do full throttle runs even in 2nd gear on most bikes without exceeding 65 mph / 104 kph.
The best method is to alternate between short bursts of hard acceleration and deceleration. You don't have to go over 65 mph / 104 kph to properly load the rings. Also, make sure that you're not being followed by another bike or car when you decelerate, most drivers won't expect that you'll suddenly slow down, and we don't want
anyone to get hit from behind !!

The biggest problem with breaking your engine in on the street (besides police) is if you ride the bike on the freeway (too little throttle = not enough pressure on the rings) or if you get stuck in slow city traffic. For the first 200 miles or so, get out into the country where you can vary the speed more
and run it through the gears !
Be Safe On The Street ! Watch your speed ! When you're not used to the handling of a new vehicle, you should accelerate only on the straightaways, then slow down extra early for the turns. Remember that both hard acceleration and hard engine braking (deceleration) are equally important during the break in process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks again guys. I know I have to be careful when riding on the street. I also have researched motoman's website.

However, The whole redline thing....you guys take it up to 17,000 RPM's before shifting (when talking about riding hard).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Thanks again guys. I know I have to be careful when riding on the street. I also have researched motoman's website.

However, The whole redline thing....you guys take it up to 17,000 RPM's before shifting (when talking about riding hard).
No, I set my shift light at 15K just beyond maximum HP

Mine is race/track only, I bought it new this february.

I put 77 miles on it on the street, just rode normal, not really hard, not babied.

Changed the oil & filter

Took it to the track and changed the oil again after my first weekend, it had maybe 400 miles on it. I rode it like a race bike should be ridden

I change the oil now after every 3 dasy, sometimes 4.

The bike now has about 2000 miles and runs like an animal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
First off, thanks a lot for the input guys. I thought there would be a lot more flaming at me for being a ignorent n0obl3t!

Blackdog, I have been riding bikes all my life. My dad never believed in ATV's so I always had to settle with our bikes. I used to think ATV's were cool, but now that I am getting more into bikes I'm glad I never had an ATV. Yes I am finally legal to drive on the road. I have a helmet and all the safety gear. This whole chicken strip business...I see that written too often on the forum here. Does that refer to a bike having only a dirt strip in the middle of the tire from not leaning? If so, my strip doesn't reach to the ends of the tire but about 1"....I lean it somewhat.

I know just asking this question would arise some of the n0ob flaming, but that's alright. I am a n0ob when it comes to breaking a bike in.

So as someone stated, I asked this question because I want this bike to be broken in hard because I too have heard that the hard-break-in bikes are stronger. When you guys say "read-lining" do you mean the red line on the tach? That can't be.

Steakneggs what did you mean by "rev-matching on downshift"?

First off, ATV's are cool, three wheelers are better, you just can't rip hundreds of donuts without stopping on a bike.

Anyhow, Yes, chicken strips are the sides of the tire that get no wear. Don't try to corner "at the limit" without first getting a bunch of miles under your belt, it's dangerous, and the bragging rights aren't worth your saftey.
Sportbike tires must warm up prior to heavy cornering, or they wont be sticky. Ride conservatively for 10 or so miles before attempting extreme cornering.

And finally rev matching is blipping the throttle very gently, to bring engine RPMS up to road speed as you downshift. You dont really *need* to do this with a slipper clutch, but when learned will make for a smoother, safer ride and will extend the life of drivetrain components.

If you ever get a chance to ride an extremely powerful bike, with a racing clutch and stiff clutch springs, rev matching is mandatory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Vary the RPMs, don't redline it, change the oil at 600 miles then ride it like a rental!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks a lot guys.

MONSTER, I think I'm going to change oil and filter after about 100 miles. I've read other peoples' experiences and Motoman's data and it seems it would be best to change my oil and filter after the majority of the break-in process has been completed.

Steakneggs, I still am not quite sure I fully understand this "rev-matching". I usually just downshift by pulling in the clutch, shifting down, and releasing the clutch. I use this procedure all the way down to first or whatever gear I'm trying to reach. You're saying I should give the bike some gas as I release the clutch when going into a lower gear?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
Thanks a lot guys.

MONSTER, I think I'm going to change oil and filter after about 100 miles. I've read other peoples' experiences and Motoman's data and it seems it would be best to change my oil and filter after the majority of the break-in process has been completed.

Steakneggs, I still am not quite sure I fully understand this "rev-matching". I usually just downshift by pulling in the clutch, shifting down, and releasing the clutch. I use this procedure all the way down to first or whatever gear I'm trying to reach. You're saying I should give the bike some gas as I release the clutch when going into a lower gear?
before you let out the clutch "blip" the throttle...give it gas to get the revs up and while letting out the clutch shut the throttle off. its a quick motion, but once you get it youll get it. watch some racers like moto gp or superbike...when they come into a corner watch their right hand. they are braking, and when they downshift you can see them pull the clutch, rev the bike and shift, and let out the clutch. its all one, smooth sequence that you wont get right the first time i can guarantee you.

i learned to rev-match in my car...the heel-toe technique (downshifting while braking) is MUCH more complex than it is on a bike, simply because your foot has to be twisted, although i modified the technique so i use the side of my foot to rev the engine, rather than my heel.

but, for starters dont brake while rev-matching your downshift. get the rev-match up to speed first. you probably wont even have to be braking while doing it on the street...engine compression will slow you down fairly quickly. i find that lightly using the brake (front) while downshifting is best, so i can have my brakelight on so anyone behind me knows im slowing down!

just do it in an isolated place at first (parking lot) so you dont have any interference while on the road. remember...let off the gas, pull clutch, downshift, rev and release throttle and let out clutch. seriously all happens in less than a half a second.

good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
before you let out the clutch "blip" the throttle...give it gas to get the revs up and while letting out the clutch shut the throttle off. its a quick motion, but once you get it youll get it. watch some racers like moto gp or superbike...when they come into a corner watch their right hand. they are braking, and when they downshift you can see them pull the clutch, rev the bike and shift, and let out the clutch. its all one, smooth sequence that you wont get right the first time i can guarantee you.

i learned to rev-match in my car...the heel-toe technique (downshifting while braking) is MUCH more complex than it is on a bike, simply because your foot has to be twisted, although i modified the technique so i use the side of my foot to rev the engine, rather than my heel.

but, for starters dont brake while rev-matching your downshift. get the rev-match up to speed first. you probably wont even have to be braking while doing it on the street...engine compression will slow you down fairly quickly. i find that lightly using the brake (front) while downshifting is best, so i can have my brakelight on so anyone behind me knows im slowing down!

just do it in an isolated place at first (parking lot) so you dont have any interference while on the road. remember...let off the gas, pull clutch, downshift, rev and release throttle and let out clutch. seriously all happens in less than a half a second.

good luck!

Soc describes it very well on how it's done. It's one of those situations where a picture is worth a thousand words. Try to find some riders and ask them to show you. If they don't know, find better guys. On a personal note, the protection element is well worth the learning curve. My zx6 is in the shop so I'm stuck riding "old slabby". Without proper rev matching, I'd be dragging the rear tire all over town, and have a very rough ride.

here's an interesting thread on the topic.


http://www.kawiforums.com/showthread.php?p=1305723#post1305723
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top