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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Kawi Riders!

Have a new Versys 650 with close to 3,000km or 1800miles on the clock.

I feel buzziness on the seat and tank when I reach about 3500rpms. Normal for this bike?

Thanks in advance..
 

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Hi and welcome!

Yes, it's normal for this bike and every bike engine to resonate at certain frequencies, rpm and conditions.

You will probably notice a slight shift in the rpm range where the vibes occur as the ecu changes ratios in different weather and altitude conditions. That's ok too.

The engine's architecture highlights a certain kind of vibrations but Kawasaki has made an excellent job in masking them, especially with the latest generations of parallel twin-equipped bikes :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and welcome!

Yes, it's normal for this bike and every bike engine to resonate at certain frequencies, rpm and conditions.

You will probably notice a slight shift in the rpm range where the vibes occur as the ecu changes ratios in different weather and altitude conditions. That's ok too.

The engine's architecture highlights a certain kind of vibrations but Kawasaki has made an excellent job in masking them, especially with the latest generations of parallel twin-equipped bikes :)

I passed on a svartpilen 401 because of this. At this point I'm already suspecting what you just clearly confirmed and explained.

Thank you sir!
 

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I passed on a svartpilen 401 because of this. At this point I'm already suspecting what you just clearly confirmed and explained.

Thank you sir!
You are welcome!

I ride a first-gen Er6-n with the same engine bolted directly to the frame without any rubber bushings whatsoever. Kawasaki thought they balanced the engine perfectly but they were wrong and so they modified the engine mounts and started adding rubber from the third year of production. This is why Mk.I bikes are still the nimblest and best handling of the series with a lot more vibration in return.

Here is a nice video explanation of the "nature" of different parallel engine layouts:

PARALLEL TWIN: 360° vs 180° vs 270° - Ultra in-depth but EASY TO UNDERSTAND - ENGINE BALANCE - YouTube

I would also recommend test riding three and especially four cylinder bikes as they can be much smoother in certain riding conditions albeit not completely vibration free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are welcome!

I ride a first-gen Er6-n with the same engine bolted directly to the frame without any rubber bushings whatsoever. Kawasaki thought they balanced the engine perfectly but they were wrong and so they modified the engine mounts and started adding rubber from the third year of production. This is why Mk.I bikes are still the nimblest and best handling of the series with a lot more vibration in return.

Here is a nice video explanation of the "nature" of different parallel engine layouts:

PARALLEL TWIN: 360° vs 180° vs 270° - Ultra in-depth but EASY TO UNDERSTAND - ENGINE BALANCE - YouTube

I would also recommend test riding three and especially four cylinder bikes as they can be much smoother in certain riding conditions albeit not completely vibration free.

Thanks for taking g the time to expound and sharing the link. Will watch it now.

I just finished a riding canyon roads (about 120kms). I'm more love with the bike now 😍
 
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