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Discussion Starter #1
where did you get your synch tool and how much was it???

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its a Motion Pro carb tuner, but on the site it says Econo Carb Tuner... it's $35.99(US).. i bought mine from www.chaparral-racing.com ..This is my first order from then and service was great and very fast delivery.. good investment

yellow = fast
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am putting in my jet kit this weekend along with my new exhaust. As long as i don't touch any of the mixture/idle screws, there should be no need for adjustment or synch should there???

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i am no mechanic but i have been told that carbs get out of synch very easily.. My problem only occured after i removed the carbs from the bike... If your bikes performance drops after the installation i would consider it.. after i synched mine i not only could tell a huge improvement in power but it also smoothed out my power and throttle response has changed greatly.. I enjoy riding my bike much more..

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You will have to adjust your air/mixture screws with a jet kit. If your taking your bike apart then I would sync your carbs. I have done 4 016rs and only 1 was right. You read that right 1 out of 4 was right, all bikes were bought new so we know someone didnt mess them. When I did my bike a had 1 carb so far off its amazing my bike ran.

2001 ZX-6R

http://home.sc.rr.com/minytrker/bike.htm
 

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same here. i had two carbs that were very bad.. and now i understand why the performance wasn't what it should have been.. great now though

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i thought i would share something with everyone... I bought my bike last year(2001 yellow).. I have removed the carbs several times and eventually my bike didn't have the power or smoothness that it used to have.. Yesterday i received my Motion Pro Carb Synch tool in the mail... I synched the carbs and now my bike runs better than when i bought it.. It's extremely smooth and more power everywhere... If anyone has removed their carbs from the bike i strongly suggest you synch the carbs.. I can't explain the difference its that much better!!![:p] sorry so long but i just had to share the wealth.. peace
bs

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hey,i have a 02 and since i put it away this winter it lost alot of its midrange. it still has topend. could this be carb sync? It has 2500 mi and i never had the first service done. not sure what they do for it
 

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its definately not a bad idea to synch your carbs... like miny said hes done 4 6r's and one was right so its not a bad idea..

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I disagree that the carbs get out of sync very easily. Just the opposite is true. If done correctly, they will stay properly balanced for quite a while. Years ago when many bikes had individual throttle cables running to each carb, you had to re-balance very often. But with today’s mechanical linkage, there's nothing to get out of whack, other than slowly changing factors such as compression, carbon build-up, etc.
The best thing for really smoothing out the carb balance operation is to install a Flo-Commander. As well as the performance improvement, the carb balance is greatly simplified. Without the Flo-Commander, even after achieving a satisfactory balance at idle, when the engine is revved a little, the mercury in the manometer stick will go all over the place. At 3000 rpm, for example, carb# 3 may be much higher than the rest and at 5000 rpm it may now be the lowest and number 1 may shoot above the rest. This also manifests itself in the way the bike runs. With the Flo-Commander installed the manometer levels remain much steadier and more uniform. I have actually had some carbs that were difficult to balance as one or more carbs refused to ‘settle down’. The Flo-Commander has changed all that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey Dave, what is the flo-commander? Please explain what it is and how it works?

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here we go again, where's swjohnson?
if i had the cash, i'd purchase one...

Originally posted by spddmn

Hey Dave, what is the flo-commander? Please explain what it is and how it works?

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Spddmn,

While the jet kit satisfies the fuel requirements, there is another product that addresses performance in a very different way. The manufacturer discovered that the air jets were not particularly satisfactory in doing their job. The function of these is to better atomize (convert into a gaseous state) rather than allow any portion of the fuel, being drawn up out of the float bowl, to simply sheet along the floor of the carburetor and trickle into the combustion chamber in a liquid state. These jets help to excite the fuel as it comes up from the float bowls and better atomize the mixture as it enters the carburetor bores. The problem results from the less than ideal situation at the jet inlets. The far larger quantities of air entering the carbs cause considerable disruption to the small amounts of air trying to enter the air jets (just below the carb bores). This disruption can easily by seen on a carb stick when balancing a set of carbs.

The Flo-Commander provides a set of fittings (to go over the main jets), a set of tubes to connect the new fittings, and a central control valve to adjust the air volumes to the proper level. I’ve installed a bunch of them and of course I’ve installed even more jet kits over the years. There really isn’t any comparison between the two. Jet kits are nice, and they nearly always make some improvement. The Flo-Commander, however, blows your socks off. I have Dyno curves on several machines I can post here. My own ZX-11 picked up over 10hp at only 6,000 rpm. A jet kit won't even come close.
For more info, check their Website at [www.flo-commander.com]
 

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A bike that has sat for the winter that wasn't stored properly might have gummed up the various circuits in the carbs. The carbs will need to be properly cleaned, and then have the carb synch reset.

And just to let Dave know, a bike can go out of synch quite easily. All it takes is a bit more carbon build up in one cylinder than all the others, and you're out of synch. Too much build up on the intake valve, carb synch is out. Too much build up on the piston crown, or elsewhere in the combustion chamber, and you lose the synch. Idle speed circuit partially blocked? There goes your carb synch. Idle speed screws not set the same on all the carbs? You'll never get a bike that idles properly, or have decently synched carbs.

So even the newest carbs need attention, otherwise why would they even bother making the carbs capable of being synchronized in the first place?

BC.


I didn't do it, I swear.
And even if I did, what makes you think I would admit it to you?
 

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It doesn't take much pushing and pulling to twist the chassis on a carb set. The adjustments on the 3 balance screws is so fine any attempt at removing the carbset will throw them out a bit.

I use a Morgan Carbtune 2 vacuum set which previous models were made using mercury for the manometers, but now are made with steel rods. The damping to stop the rods from hopping up and down are taken care of by using 1" lengths of small bore pipe at the carb end of the connecting pipes.

IMO if there are pressure imbalances at different revs in the range , then the likely hood is its cause is a combination of different wear rates on the rings, machining imperfections in the lobe profiles from bore to bore, different flow rates in the inlet tracts from cylinder to cylinder and the harmonics causing back pressure differences from the different lengths of pipe between the exhaust valve and collector box:D.

I'm inclined to agree with BC.

Ash;)

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
 

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syncing the carbs would be different than syncing the jest? wouldnt it be? what about a throttle position control sensor,would adjusting this help at all?



modern man
eco system destroyer
 

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Originally posted by purevol

syncing the carbs would be different than syncing the jest? wouldnt it be? what about a throttle position control sensor,would adjusting this help at all?

The jets don't need synching. There is a slight difference in sizing between the outside to inside cylinder jets, but as long as the needle positions are the same for all and the floats are set up properly, its just down to the mixture screw, which is also set the same for all carbs at tickover and slow running and then finally down to the carb balance.

It may be stating the obvious but the balance gauges just make sure that all of the cylinders are running at the same speed and one cylinder isn't running at 2000rpm while the one next to it is running at 1200rpm and the bike between the 2 cylinders (on a 2 cylinder bike)is running at 1600 rpm, and offering a lumpy power delivery as the powerbands on each cylinder hits at different times.

Ash

Live to ride, Erm Erm, Where are my Car Keys ?
 

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Bladecutter,

I couldn't disagree with you more. You suggest that if somehow carbon were to build up, unevenly I assume, on your pistons or valves that the carb balance would be thrown off. Assuming that the carbs were balanced in the first place, the carbon accumulation will be extremely consistent among all the cylinders. It would require years of regular use for an uneven accumulation to cause any measurable carb imbalance. Only some other problem, such as a coil or electrical problem to accelerate an uneven accumulation of carbon would be a concern. The actual effect on the carb balance is more a result of any volumetric changes in the relative capacities of each cylinder. In other words any changes in compression among cylinders resulting from rings or valve sealing is far more likely to have an effect on carb balance. Uneven carbon buildup is so far done the list of likely causes as to be of no concern at all.
As I tried to convey earlier, when an engine is in proper tune and the carbs are in balance, they will remain that way for a long time. There's nothing wrong with checking them periodically, but you'll find a few dozen other things to be far more in need of frequent maintenance.
 

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That's the thing though, Dave. I know my bikes are always in proper riding order, just as I'm sure you know your bike's to be also. But we don't know what condition everyone else's bikes are in when they start asking questions on here.

We don't know the last time they had a valve adjustment, what type of gas they use, how hard they ride the bike, how often they change the oil, or if they even know what a carb synch is.

If their bike has never been synched, sat all winter with gas in the carbs, plus one of the floats got stuck and flooded out one of the cylinders, killing a spark plug, then they started riding it for several weeks running on three cylinders before they asked us questions, then they have more carbon build up on one cylinder.

Or better yet, they just bought a bike from someone who had all that stuff happen, and now they are trying to get it back into tip-top shape.

Regardless, lets say they fix the float, change the spark plugs, and synch the carbs, and it runs 90% better, the more they ride the bike, and the carbon in the cylinders and on the intake valve gets burned off, it will throw the carb synch, because everything NOW has returned to normal. So now you go and re-synch it, and now its at 100%.

These are machines, and everyone treats theirs differently than everyone else. You might never need to re-synch your carbs, but someone else might. Everyone's different.

A carb synch won't hurt anyone, and they don't always come perfect from the factory. Just like the idle speed screws aren't always set the same amount of turns out on all the carbs.

A bike that's working properly and well maintaned won't need work as often as a bike that gets neglected. And this is the time of year everyone brings their bikes out of storage, and issues come up. Maybe their battery is on its last legs, maybe one of their carbs is gummed up... Who knows.

All I know is there's a lot of things that can put a bike out of proper working order, and its better to start small and work your way up than to just throw money on go fast parts, and hope they help fix things up.

BC.


I didn't do it, I swear.
And even if I did, what makes you think I would admit it to you?
 
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