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I feel like consumer reports isn't worth much these days for cars. Fit, finish and safety seem to be pretty solid across the board for all major car manufacturers so the differences are negligible. Im more co coerced with reliability. Any decent car is gonna have nice door gaps but is it gonna be a pile after putting 50k on it and will it cost be a fortune to repair are of more of a concern to me these days.

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. Im more co coerced with reliability. Any decent car is gonna have nice door gaps but is it gonna be a pile after putting 50k on it and will it cost be a fortune to repair are of more of a concern to me these days.
:plusone:

I'm looking at buying a SUV or another car to tow my racebike and travel with and reliability is #1 on the list
 

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I like my Ridgeline. Comfort and reliability all in one. Plus SUV and Truck all in one too.
I was looking at a ridgeline or a avalanche. Just too bad they're not very good on gas and I work downtown so trying to park that thing would be a friggen nightmare. So a small suv like a fx35, forester, pilot, outlander would be perfect!
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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A list for car reliability by brand from late October 2016 is linked below. I have a 2015 Mazda CX-5 I bought used, which is considered the most reliable Mazda. I am glad I did not buy a new Mazda CX-3, which is considered the least reliable Mazda and probably caused them to drop in the list by brand. I notice Chevy has ads based on JD Power results for initial quality- in my opinion much more bullcrappy than Consumer Reports info. Every April Consumer Reports comes out with their annual car buying guide magazine (at most public libraries to read for free), and they often have other auto summaries all year in store magazine racks.
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Car Brands Reliability: How They Stack Up - Consumer Reports
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The previous article is for car reliability in the last 2 model years, that is broken down for each model in other articles. The info below is for older cars on a budget, and is from the April 2016 Consumer Reports annual car guide. Note that their survey results from thousands of owners rates the Toyota Tundra and Honda Ridgeline trucks the most reliable, and all of the smaller trucks from the last 10 years do poorly for reliability:


“The best of the best used car models are represented here. Each model performed well in our road tests when it was new and had above-average reliability for the model years shown. In addition, each vehicle offered ESC as a standard or optional feature.

Of course, even for used cars we recommend, there can be stinkers—due to a bad day at the factory or a former owner who didn’t care much for car maintenance. Before you buy, make sure to pay for a thorough inspection by a certified mechanic, so there are no surprises down the road.

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Less Than $10,000

Small cars (with available ESC)

• Ford Focus (2009-10)
• Pontiac Vibe (2006-09)
• Scion xB (2008-09)

The Focus delivers a steady ride, an interior that feels upscale for the price, and sporty handling. The Vibe is a reliable and spacious compact hatchback similar to the Toyota Matrix. The xB is a cargo box on wheels, ready to haul almost anything you can throw in or at it.


Sedans

• Acura TL (2006)
• Acura TSX (2006)
• Hyundai Sonata (2007-09)
• Mazda6 (2009)

You can stick to your budget and still get a reliable premium car if you choose the slick-handling Acura TL. The smaller TSX is a sportier alternative based on the European Honda Accord. The Hyundai Sonata is an accommodating alternative in a plain package. The sporty Mazda6 has a supple ride.


SUVs and Minivans

• Honda CR-V (2006)
• Honda Pilot (2006)
• Toyota Sienna (2006)

Standard ESC and curtain airbags, combined with acres of space, make the reliable CR-V a can't-miss prospect. For even more room, check out the eight-seat Pilot with its smooth V6 acceleration and carlike handling. Opt for the Sienna if you need the bountiful accommodations and flexibility of a minivan.
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$10,000 to $15,000


Small Cars

• Honda Fit (2011-13)
• Kia Soul (2011-13)
• Mazda3 (2011-12)

The Fit is a bit noisy, but excellent fuel economy and a flexible interior make it a standout among subcompacts. The boxy yet stylish Soul has tons of features for a small car and expansive cargo space, making it a smart choice for recent grads. The Mazda3 has everything most shoppers want in a small car: reliability, fuel efficiency, a fun-to-drive attitude, an interior that feels upscale for the price, and seats that won't leave your back and tailbone screaming.


Sedans

• Infiniti G (2006-08)
• Lincoln MKZ (2009-10)

The G35 is Exhibit A in how to blend sporty handling with interior refinement. For less of a race-car feel, the MKZ has available AWD and a supple ride. Look for a 2010 model, which has a quieter, more luxurious interior.


SUVs

• Acura MDX (2006)
• Toyota Highlander (2006-07)

The MDX's quiet interior and responsive handling put an enjoyable spin on family-friendly vehicles, showing why it's the standard for three-row crossover SUVs. The rock-solid, reliable Highlander is slightly smaller, but for some, it's a handier size. It's available with a third-row seat, and the hybrid version delivers the fuel economy of a small SUV.
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$15,000 to $20,000


Small Cars

• Toyota Prius (2012-13)
• Hyundai Elantra (2014-15)
• Honda Civic (2013-14)

The Prius has always proved that you don't have to give up space or ride comfort to get stellar gas mileage. And its standard electronic stability control is an added bonus. Lots of features for the money, a roomy backseat, and responsive handling make the Elantra a great deal. Go for a 2013 or newer Civic to get its much-needed upgrades in braking, suspension, and the interior.


Sedans

• Honda Accord (2011-12)
• Toyota Camry (2012-13)
• Lexus ES (2009-10)

A cavernous backseat, Honda's typically responsive suspension and 25 mpg overall from the four-cylinder engine make the Accord a perennial winner. The Camry is also a no-brainer thanks to stellar reliability and ample space for five adults. The ES takes the Camry platform and adds luxury appointments, front seats worthy of a road trip, and a hushed cabin.


SUVs

• Mazda CX-5 (2013)
• Toyota RAV4 (2010-11)

Mazda's CX-5 has very good fuel economy, crisp handling, and a generous rear seat. The RAV4 is available with four- and six-cylinder engines, both of which are quite fuel-efficient. Nimble, secure handling is a plus.
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$20,000 to $25,000


Sedans

• Ford Fusion (2014-15)
• Subaru Legacy (2014-15)
• Toyota Avalon (2012)

With its composed ride and European-style handling, the Fusion is a reliable, roomy sedan. The spacious and refined Legacy offers a wide variety of advanced safety features. Choose the Avalon if you want a commodious, luxurious sedan without the upscale price.


SUVs

• Nissan Murano (2012-13)
• Subaru Forester (2012-13)
• Toyota Sequoia (2008)

The Murano has long been one of our favorite SUVs, with secure handling and a rich interior. The Subaru Forester has standard AWD, plentiful rear-seat accommodations, great visibility, and a comfortable ride. If you need a reliable SUV with seating for eight and strong towing capability, the Sequoia is a good choice.


Luxury

• Mercedes-Benz E-Class (2009)
• Acura RDX (2011)
• Lexus RX (2010)

The fun-to-drive and smooth-riding E-Class wraps its occupants in a first-class cabin. The Acura blends sporty handling and upscale accoutrements in a reliable small SUV package. The Lexus RX is the go-to upscale SUV for used-car buyers, with its bulletproof reliability, plush seats, and luxury ride. The hybrid version gets an impressive 26 mpg overall.”

From:
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Best Used Cars for $25,000 and Less - Consumer Reports
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From a June 2016 Car & Driver magazine article for 2 affordable cars (especially used)- of course, your own test drives and your research for reliability will likely be more important:


“The Mazda 3 leans more and has quicker steering, while the VW Golf has better body control and trumps the 3 in feedback. Inside, the 3 is flashy while the Golf is correspondingly somber and serious.


If you want to know why the Golf finishes second for us, blame its throttle response, which has all the urgency of Wolfsburg answering its mail from the EPA. From a standing stop, the VW is at its worst. The transmission is as dimwitted as the throttle is recalcitrant. After depressing the accelerator, the driver (and the turbo) is left waiting far too long for either one to respond. Once that single-scroll turbocharger spools, however, the Golf feels quick, and in traffic it surges ahead for confident passing. Use the small, steering-wheel-mounted ¬paddles to short-shift the six-speed automatic at the engine’s 4500-rpm power peak rather than its 7000-rpm rev cutoff and you’d never suspect that the Volkswagen, at 170 horsepower, is down 14 to the Mazda.


The Golf is a car for grown-ups. It is softer and more comfortable than the 3, especially when approaching the traction limit. The Volkswagen never really encourages you to go fast, responding merely with unperturbed grace when you do.


Past 5,000 rpm, the 3 comes alive at precisely the same place in the rev range where the Golf goes to sleep. At high revs, the Mazda’s right pedal feels like a hair-trigger, and the wailing intake and brassy exhaust make the 3 sound like a Miata hatchback.


The 3 requires more effort, more revs, and more noise to translate those test-track acceleration numbers into real-world performance. The VW was easier to keep in the meat of its power¬band, allowing for a lazier driving style without dropping off the pace. It’s likely better suited to shuttling the kids and picking up the dry cleaning. But that’s ultimately the reason why the Mazda wins. It’s the car that asks for more effort—indeed, more driving—but pays out with more enjoyment.


From:
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2016 Mazda 3 2.5L vs. 2015 Volkswagen Golf 1.8T TSI ? Comparison Test ? Car and Driver
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Much cheaper to add nitrous, a turbo, or a supercharger to the stock engine, but this one will likely keep its value a lot longer for its huge power:


"Flyin’ Miata’s LS3-V8 powered 2016 Mazda MX-5 is one of the most communicative, engaging, and enchanting cars I’ve ever driven.


Flyin’ Miata, a small shop based in Colorado’s peach-farming town of Palisade, has modified Miatas since the original debuted and has churned out V-8 Miatas for more than eight years now.


The first-gen Miata had so much empty space in its engine bay you couldn’t help but imagine a V-8 in there. You’d think doing so would upset the car’s balance and composure, but the LS1 engine Flyin’ Miata first used for swaps didn’t weigh much more than the original Miata’s inline-four.


This new car’s LS3 and accompanying Tremec T56 six-speed manual transmission — typically used in Vipers and Corvettes — weigh a combined 622 pounds, only 237 more than Mazda’s stock powertrain; that’s trading 10 percent more weight for 240 percent more power. Solid, considering weight distribution isn’t whacked-out either, landing at 53 percent front, 47 rear.


The Hard Dog roll bar is included in the build but can be bought separately for $525. It fits snugly under the factory softtop without any sort of rubbing.


The rear subframe can handle the engine’s 486 lb-ft of torque now that it is supported by a giant cross-tube and a couple metal reinforcement plates that hold the chassis bars together as load transfers to the rear differential, plucked from a 4,000-pound Camaro SS.


“The drivetrain is completely overbuilt for its use,” says Keith Tanner, one of the head techs at Flyin’ Miata who previously raced his V-8 MX-5 in the Targa Newfoundland.


I ask him how this new car compares to past V-8 builds, and he says, “It’s the best of the bunch. First time on the track, it felt immediately familiar. Like my track car that I’ve been honing for eight years. It’s got the potential to be an excellent long-distance cruiser as well as really, really sharp on the track.”


As the mountain goats saunter toward the edge of the road, I ease onto the Miata’s accelerator. Tip-in is immediate, and every bit of slack has been sucked from the pedal. When hooves hit dirt, I let out the heavy clutch, and the rear end hooks up surprisingly well, considering there’s no traction control and the matched tires are each only 1.5 inches wider than those on a Club edition.


Speed builds instantaneously, and a quick, notchy upshift through the transmission’s narrow gates helps me hit 60 mph in about 3.5 seconds. With the bright red needle on the speedometer moving almost as fast as the one on the tach, I check the rearview mirror and see nothing but a big, black roll bar, so I stay on it until I come to a set of quick sweepers.


The exhaust burbles as I lift and bury the brake pedal, the six-piston Wilwood front brake calipers grabbing hard and fast, the car wiggling around as it slows. Everything stays flat as I pitch the car left to right and back, the rear end stepping out just a bit between transitions.


This car exhibits the best mid-corner balance I’ve experienced, letting you sit comfortably on the tightrope between useable traction and none. The Fox Racing suspension dampers, rebuilt by Tanner himself, have made one of the best chassis on the market even better.


There isn’t a long enough road, with enough sharp corners or chicanes. The Miata has long been the simplest distillation of what we love about driving, and Flyin’ Miata’s V-8 swap doesn’t complicate its charm at all. As a driver’s car, it’s flawless.


Since it’s a prototype, the car has quirks, including a few electrical gremlins. Just about everything digital in the new Miata is interconnected; by getting rid of electrically assisted steering, for example, lane-departure warning went down, the adaptive headlights went awry, and tire pressure monitors checked out. “We had nine error lights on Thursday, but we’re down to four now,” says Tanner, who assures me all the e-wrinkles will soon be ironed out.


Flyin’ Miata’s V-8 turn-key conversion will cost $49,995 on top of the cost of the car, which means explaining to your better half you’re going to spend about $80,000 on a Miata. “It’s an expensive Miata, but the guys who are buying these cross-shopping against an F-Type or 911.”


Of course those cars have widespread dealership networks standing behind them when things go wrong, but Flyin’ Miata has considered that, too. The engine has a two-year warranty that will be honored nationwide by just about any GM Performance Parts dealer, and Flyin’ Miata uses as many off-the-shelf parts as it can so that if something does fail, you can walk to NAPA, part number in hand, and pick something up on the spot.


Slowly cruising through Colorado’s red rock canyons at dusk, I’m shocked and delighted that I’ve not only discovered one of my new favorite cars, but also that such disparate parties could come together to bring this car to life: Mazda’s amazingly capable foundation, Chevy’s well-oiled aftermarket machine, and Flyin’ Miata’s dedication to doing things differently.


The LS3-powered 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata perfectly encapsulates what enthusisasts love about our little world, and I wish the folks who first built these ridiculous roadsters could be here today to see my smile."

Price: $82,125 (as tested)

Engine: 6.2L OHV 16-valve V-8/525 hp @ 6,200 rpm, 486 lb-ft @ 5,200 rpm

Transmission: 6-speed manual

EPA Mileage: 14/25 mpg (city/hwy) (est)

Weight: 2,592 lb

0-60 MPH: 3.4 sec (est)

From:
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Exclusive First Drive: Flyin? Miata?s V-8-Powered 2016 Mazda MX-5 | Automobile Magazine
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For someone that wants a back seat and a smaller price:

The 2016 Honda Civic with an automatic transmission got a second place finish in the summer 2016 driving comparison partly copied below (the Mazda 3 got first place) and is a possibility if you like the hockey-stick style tail lights, along with researching the reliability for it:

"The reformed Civic once again rides on a gold-star chassis.

The excellence of both the Honda and the Mazda will convince you that lesser compact cars’ handling attributes are merely side effects of their ride tuning or cost-saving measures, rather than objectives unto themselves.

In the Civic, a multilink rear suspension is helped by the test’s lowest center of gravity and a 121-pound weight advantage to deliver the highest cornering grip at 0.85 g, on pedestrian rubber no less.

The steering translates sharp on-center precision into immediate turn-in, but it’s never twitchy on the highway.

A cockpit offers both the roomiest and most comfortable rear seat. While our drivers all agreed that the driver’s seat is perfectly shaped, Honda installed it such that the front is lower than the rear and so taller drivers complained about a lack of thigh support.

Honda’s seven-inch touchscreen, the antithesis of Hyundai’s easy-to-use system, relegates all the audio controls to the flat-glass pane.

The Civic’s 2.0-liter revs smoothly and produces confident midrange pull with a strong top-end finish. It’s helped by a CVT that’s among the best in the business. As good as it is, the transmission may be the reason the Civic finished in second here.

We could imagine the Honda earning the highest fun-to-drive score and reshuffling the finishing order with the standard six-speed manual. Regardless of the gearbox, this smart and fun car is once again living up to its potential.

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2016 Chevrolet Cruze vs. 2016 Honda Civic, 2017 Hyundai Elantra, 2016 Mazda 3, 2016 Nissan Sentra - Comparison Tests - Page 5
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Another summer 2016 comparison test from the Motor Trend magazine staff, especially for someone who must buy a car from the Detroit Three for political reasons (maybe rewarding bad more local design because they are racist):


“Finishing fifth, the Volkswagen Jetta is overdue for a complete makeover. The Jetta suffers from VW’s unwillingness to give its small sedan the same love and care and attention to detail as it gave the Golf.


The Mazda3 came in Fourth Place, the winner in the 2014 Big Test. It feels less special now and offers middling performances in almost all of our seven criteria.


Third place goes to the Hyundai Elantra. The visuals promise, but the mechanicals don’t quite deliver on that promise.


Second place goes to the Chevrolet Cruze, the most improved player of the group. It feels like an altogether more thorough effort than its predecessor. It’s the recipient of a revamped look inside and out and has the peppiest drivetrain. It’s nice to see an actual interior design in this segment. It’s not something you see.


That leaves the gold medal for the Honda Civic. Lacking luxury-oriented items like in the Chevy or Hyundai, it’s pretty evident where the development and packaging money went in this car: Efficiency, Safety, and Performance. This is the first Civic in a long time that seems to have some of the old Honda magic back. It drives better, it feels better, it’s engineered better, it’s got special sauce—the X factor—and this thing has it in spades.”


From:

The Big Test: 2016/2017 Compact Sedans - Motor Trend
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I had a 1998 design full size Chevy truck, but after we finished remodeling our house I sold it for something with better gas mileage and easier to park.

This writing below is from January 2015 Car & Driver testing for full size trucks. Even though the Toyota Tundra has the highest reliability ratings, it came in fourth place for this testing, (not including the Honda Ridgeline).

Anyone living where there is salt on the roads in the winter should consider the aluminum body Ford, especially if they will keep it 30 years to make up for higher insurance costs (just put down some plywood before dropping big rocks or tool boxes into the bed, like the stupid Chevy ads):

"It might not ride quite as nicely as the Ram or handle as well as the Chevy, but the F-150 is the best all-around full-size pickup truck.

The new F-150 seems engineered to make us forget that it’s made of aluminum. Everything is oversized, from the shiny plastic door handles thick enough to fill your palm to the heavy doors that need to be muscled open like a 737’s.

At 5577 pounds, this $61,520 F-150 still weighs more than two Fiesta STs. It’s the lightest truck in this test, but not by as much as it should be. There’s truth to the quip that by saving 600 pounds, Ford finally got its truck to weigh as little as a Chevy.


That noted, this F-150 is as quiet as an aluminum tomb. Good insulation and excellent management of the air around the vehicle keep down noise. The sounds that are heard—some tire rumble, a hint of turbo whine—are muffled or pleasant.

The F-150 offers the most advanced and easiest to read instrumentation. Throw in the new 360-degree camera system that eases everything from hitching up a trailer to crawling over obstacles at low speed and the Technology package here is the most fully realized and the best available.

With rear leaf springs, the F-150 can’t match the Ram for ride quality, and it isn’t as athletic as the Silverado, but its ride-and-handling balance may be the best. Though some found the steering too light, others thought it nicely weighted, even if it doesn’t have much to say.

The perfect truck would be as nimble as the Silverado, ride like the Ram, and pack in the useful technology of the F-150. Right now Ford is the best compromise, even if perfect fulfillment still eludes it."

From:
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2015 Ford F-150 vs. 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, 2015 Ram 1500, 2014 Toyota Tundra Comparison Tests - Page 5 - Car and Driver
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For April 2017, the Consumer Reports best used cars (and now trucks) list is a lot longer, compared to their April 2016 list.

They highlight about 1 out of 8 on their list as being the best of the best used vehicles, for both test drive scores and reliability, and as usual highly recommend the ones that come with electronic stability control (ESC)- sometimes an option for the higher trim levels in 2007 and 2008 (the Corolla, Matrix and Camry got standard ESC for all in 2010, and the Miata got standard ESC for all in 2012).

These are the better ones, according to their survey results for many thousands of owners:

2007 to 2010 Pontiac Vibe (Toyota reliability with Pontiac lower pricing)

2007 to 2016 Toyota Corolla

2007, 2008, 2010 Toyota Matrix (like the Pontiac Vibe)

2007 to 2016 Toyota Prius

2007 to 2016 Honda Accord

2007 to 2016 Toyota Avalon

2007 to 2016 Toyota Camry

2007 to 2010, 2013 to 2014 Acura TL

2007 to 2013 Acura TSX

2012 to 2015 Buick Verano

2007 to 2008, 2011 to 2013 Infiniti M

2011 to 2015 Lexus CT 200h

2007 to 2014 Lexus ES

2007 to 2008, 2013 Lexus GS

2008, 2010 to 2012 Lexus IS

2007 to 2013, 2016 Mazda Miata

2012 to 2016 Toyota Prius V

2009 to 2015 Toyota Venza (check out the 0 to 60 mph time- surprisingly fast)

2013 to 2016 Subaru XV/Crosstrek

2008 to 2016 Toyota RAV4

2007 to 2013 Lexus RX

2007 to 2008, 2010 to 2012 Toyota 4Runner

2007 to 2013 Toyota Highlander

2007 to 2013 Honda Ridgeline

2007 to 2008, 2010 to 2012 Toyota Tundra

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On a more personal note, we gave our 19-year-old son our 2006 Toyota RAV4, and even though the RAV4 has higher reliability scores, we bought a 2013 and a 2015 Mazda CX-5 instead.

We like sitting higher than a car, a back seat that is not too bad for 2 adults, and enough luggage space behind the seats for a week long vacation.

We found that the CX-5 looks better and drives better than the RAV4, and it gets better gas mileage. A summary for a 2013 comparison test by Car & Driver is linked below, for their top 3 in this segment:
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2013 Toyota RAV4 XLE AWD vs. 2014 Subaru Forester 2.5i Touring, 2014 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring AWD: Final Scoring, Performance Data, and Complete Specs
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For mid-size cars, Camaro or Mustang? I like the taller windshield of the Mustang, but the newest Camaro drives better. The newest versions of my previous 1972 Plymouth Barracuda (the Challenger or Charger) are a lot taller and heavier, more for long trips than for fast cornering, but nice looking tail lights for the upper level trim packages, to go with less than average reliability.

From the June 2016 Car & Driver magazine:

“We’ve run a six-cylinder Camaro to 60 mph in as little as 5.1 seconds, but even at 5.5 seconds in this test, the V-6 is probably only about a second slower to that mark than the Camaro SS with its stonking 455-hp 6.2-liter V-8 (when equipped with a manual transmission).

And what might be the ultimate measure of the two middle-rung cars we’ve tested here: How often while driving one of them would you regret not having purchased the V-8? The answer is, in the case of the Camaro, not very often. In the Mustang the answer would be always.

The Camaro’s chassis and seats and steering and turn-in response are better than the Mustang’s, that makes awarding the win to the Chevy all the more easy.”

From:
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2016 Chevrolet Camaro V-6 vs. 2016 Ford Mustang EcoBoost - Comparison Tests - Page 3
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For less of a muscle-car mid-sized (cheaper), my Mazda 6 fanboy choice came in first with the Chevy Malibu second during this 2016 magazine testing linked below.

“No car here laps up a curve like the Mazda 6, with the feistiest steering and the flattest body motion. The 2.5-liter slammed home the quickest drag-strip times as well as an observed fuel economy 2 mpg higher than the others.

Running chores, it purrs quietly, and the transmission is all but invisible unless you push the sport button. Seemingly programmed by Mazda’s unemployed ex–Le Mans team, it makes the 6 hellbent for lap times, holding gears longer and executing rapid-fire downshifts under braking. Some drivers wouldn’t have minded a middling, “sorta sport” setting, but Mazda is an all-in company.


As is often the case with Mazda, the downside is cabin noise. Tire thrum and thwack are the most pronounced in this machine, partly due to the 19-inch rims wearing 168-mph-rated Dunlop tires. We would trade some of the 129-pound weight savings over the quieter Accord for more insulation.

Also on the negative side, the long dead zone in the brake pedal seemed out of place in a chassis that is so capable, especially next to the Malibu’s firm binders, and the steering wheel doesn’t telescope as far as the others, meaning taller folk may suffer.”


For their overall summary page:
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2016 Chevrolet Malibu vs. 2016 Honda Accord, 2016 Mazda 6, 2016 Toyota Camry: Final Scoring, Performance Data, and Complete Specs
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To save more money (to also buy a bike) without sacrificing reliability or safety too much, a 2014 small car with just under or just over the 36,000 mile warranty miles might be a good choice. I think Carmax is a good place to buy one, especially if you have an independent mechanic check it over during the grace period (you have a week to take the car back for a full refund if you change your mind). From one 2014 article:
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7th Place: Dodge Dart
A handsome handler, and you’ll pay less per pound or per pony, but it costs the most in the long run.

6th Place: Volkswagen Jetta
How many bells and whistles must you trade for big turbo fun? Most of them.

5th Place: Hyundai Elantra
Jack of all compact virtues, master of none — a solid-C all-arounder.

4th Place: Toyota Corolla
You could do yoga in the back seat — and have way more fun than driving the car.

3rd Place: Honda Civic
Great tranny, brakes, and sticker price, but where’s that magic Honda driving joy?

2nd Place: Kia Forte
A fantastic little car let down by a dodgy safety rating and high ownership costs.

1st Place: Mazda3
The Big Test report card with the most As wins.

From:

The Big Test: 2014 Compact Sedans - Motor Trend
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