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Discussion Starter #1
Thank you, Richard. I can finally know when my bike is warmed up. :)





Doubles as a clock, too. :)

 

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Kelly - Install looks clean and nice (what else, coming from you). I don't have my bike with me.... I thought it ran off of an internal battery. Did you hard-wire to power?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Kelly - Install looks clean and nice (what else, coming from you). I don't have my bike with me.... I thought it ran off of an internal battery. Did you hard-wire to power?
I read the instructions after I PMd you. :rolleyes:

The power wire is used for illumination, so the unit will work w/o it hooked up. Yes the internal battery is what powers the unit.

I hard wired it to a switched +12v power wire in a harness connector close to the tank right next to where the water temp sensor screws in. I see the display is now lighted when the bike is running. :)

Thanks for your help... hope you can find a good source for po'ke in your neighborhood.
:cheers-004:

mahalo, brah... please let me know when you intend to be on island again.
:)
 

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very nice ........
 

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I think I need one!
 

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Ohhh! The bikes run at 210 eh?

I think I got an idea for my next 'mod'. 180 degree thermostat baby :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ohhh! The bikes run at 210 eh?

I think I got an idea for my next 'mod'. 180 degree thermostat baby :)
nah, I had just installed it and the bike was idling in the garage. I suspect once I ride it, the airflow will keep it down to a reasonable temp.

haven't even looked... do these bikes have a thermostat?
 

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You betcha :) For emissions purposes/not 'over-cooling' the bike (Which can cause cylinder wear when gas re-liquifies and washes the cylinder walls) you need a thermostat. I was suspecting the thermostat was probably around 200-210 (the hotter, the better the emissions). The pictured housing splits in half. Sandwiched in there is a thermostat :)

How'd you hook the sensor up for your temp gauge btw? Did you tee off the temp sensor for the radiator fan (shown above)? Or is it a probe style unit?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
they provided a replacement for the stock probe. I left the wire that connected to the stock probe hanging. Are you sure that probe is what they use to trigger the fan? That wire wasn't connected and when I warmed up the bike after the install, I swear I heard the fan turn on. Now that you said that, I'll need to recheck to see if the fan really does turn on. If it doesn't, maybe that's why it's reading as high as it is. :p
 

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Ok, I looked it up. Cheapcycleparts lists that as a, "Switch, sensor water" and I figured it was the radiator fan temperature sender and the overheating light switch. *sigh* Kawi makes TWO different senders though. So that one is actually JUST the overheating light indicator switch. The temperature sender is...

In the radiator on the left-hand side (right above the lower radiator hose). So yeah :)
... I'm still going to change that damned thermostat out though (Then once I get a temperature gauge I'll put a resistor in the radiator sender line to trigger it at a lower temp) :p
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks. I was just looking at the overall cooling system diagrams of the pregens and I did see that second sender in the rad. figured that was for the fan. :)

interesting idea about the resistors in line to trigger the fan on earlier. not sure, but think the fan didn't come on till the temps were over 200.

might a manual turn on switch for the fan work better in conjunction with the sensor temp? I know that was a popular mod for my previous Pcar for when people were stuck in traffic. Air cooled engines don't like running that hot. :eek:
 

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thanks. I was just looking at the overall cooling system diagrams of the pregens and I did see that second sender in the rad. figured that was for the fan. :)

interesting idea about the resistors in line to trigger the fan on earlier. not sure, but think the fan didn't come on till the temps were over 200.

might a manual turn on switch for the fan work better in conjunction with the sensor temp? I know that was a popular mod for my previous Pcar for when people were stuck in traffic. Air cooled engines don't like running that hot. :eek:
Well that's exactly why people run resistors on the radiator fan's sender with lower temp thermostats (Otherwise IN that stop and go traffic the thermostat is open, but the fan doesn't know any better). I used to run manual over-rides on the radiator fans on drag cars so after a pass you could shut the car down and still have the fan going. :D

I wonder about these senders though as they seem not to be temperature senders, but more of 'relay' sensors. So resisting the current might be pointless as they either read full 'on' or fully 'off' and not a variable current.

Yeah resistors on temperature senders is a great ways of cheating especially with fuel injected set-ups. You can throw one (with a switch) on the IAT (Inlet air temperature sensor) and fool the ECU into thinking the inlet air is like 30 degrees outside with the flick of a switch so it'll step the fuel maps up a little to compensate :D . Cheating I say!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
some temp feedback for anyone interested. :)

while running uphill to work, during the hottest time of the day, coolant temps run between 180-190F.

at night coming home and doing a steady speed 50-60mph on flat land, gauge is reading about 150-160F.

from a dead cold startup till the gauge starts reading 150F, it takes a good 5 minutes for the coolant to reach that temp. ambient temps around here is between 70-80F when the bike is started.

so, for those without a water temp gauge, I would wait at least 5 minutes before you really start pushing the bike to redline after a cold startup... longer if your ambient temps are below 70F and you have the stock lean jetting in your bike.

hth...
:)
 

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some temp feedback for anyone interested. :)

while running uphill to work, during the hottest time of the day, coolant temps run between 180-190F.

at night coming home and doing a steady speed 50-60mph on flat land, gauge is reading about 150-160F.

from a dead cold startup till the gauge starts reading 150F, it takes a good 5 minutes for the coolant to reach that temp. ambient temps around here is between 70-80F when the bike is started.

so, for those without a water temp gauge, I would wait at least 5 minutes before you really start pushing the bike to redline after a cold startup... longer if your ambient temps are below 70F and you have the stock lean jetting in your bike.

hth...
:)

Now thats some solid info that I've been waiting for! YAY!

Would you venture to say that most motorcycles would be about the same temps?
 

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Cool. Sounds about right.

By the time I start my bike, finish gearing up, and get out of my neighborhood, its about good to go. I usually test it by blipping the throttle really fast off idle. When it's still a little cold, the bike will garble(do you like my verbiage?) up a bit. But once warm, when blipped really fast off idle, it will rev no problem.
 

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You can just feel the exhaust to see if the bike is warmed up.
 
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