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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys

This has probably been asked many times before, but I don't want to mess this up.

I received some OEM plastic bits for my bike, but it's in that dodgy metallic Ford Sierra(that's what I compare it to) green. Unfortunately, we can only get the OEM parts in that colour (well, that's what the dealer says).

I'd like to give them a diy makeover with some spray cans, but I want to do a descent job...obviously.

Can anyone give some directions with regard to the whole process i.e how to prep the already painted surface, which sand paper to use, how many layers of primer, colour and clear coat etc etc?

Thanks very much

Cheers
 

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-- Chris Bynum's Motorcycles: DIY Painting Tips --

Thanx for bringin this up, I'm gonna repair my crashed fairings & paint 'em soon.
All I ever hear about painting is its all in the preparation, smoothing, sanding and keeping the area clean and organized. I may fail miserably at the organization aspect but I'll be sure its clean.
I also tend to rush things. I want stuff done yesterday and if I see a short cut, I usually take it.
Take your time, good luck.
Post up photo's as you go or encounter a problem, theres plenty of members who've done this before who can help you out with the process.
 

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dont use spray cans....

buy a spray gun and do it the way its ment to be done.
you shouldnt need primer unless you break through the paint thats already on the plastics, use 400-600 grit wet and dry paper, sand the plastics untill the shine has gone this process is called keying the surface. clean the plastics with a wax and grease remover tac cloth and start to paint, two to three coats of colour should be enough ( depending on the colour and how you reduce it) wait 5 mins between coats and once you have the old colour covered wait 10 to 15 mins tack cloth again and start clearing the plastics apply one med coat wait 5 mins then a med-wet coat and you are done walk away at this point wait for it to dry and de nib and polish as required

i have been painting cars and aircraft for 8 yrs now.

if you want any more info send me a message

PS if it all seems to hard pay some one to do it hahaha
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I figure it'll be a waste for me to buy a spray gun and compressor, as I won't be doing this too often. I'm just waiting for a quote from a body shop and if it's reasonable, I'll rather have it done by the pro's. Would be nice as a weekend project though...
 

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^ yea most people that rattle can do flat black, cant really go wrong especially if you sand and clean it properly.

but as whateveryone said, spray it with a gun. but the thing is, if you have a shitty compressor be ready to get angry when you have to keep pausing to spray.
 

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And if you use a compressor make sure you come out of the tank with a water filter. Then a LONG line and another water filter. Finally use one of the little screw on filters you attach right on the handle of the gun. They have them at most any place that sells automotive paint supplies.
 

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did my whole bike in spray cans from walmart. Sanded down the original stuff, and primed, ect. Got about 50 bucks in the whole thing.

Edit: The second to last photo is what they looked like when I bought them. The final photo is what I did
 

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did my front (was mean kawasaki green) fender w/ krylon fusion. Apparently that stuff adheres pretty well to plastics. Just dont spray too closely, otherwise it will run. One can was enough for 3/4 of the front fender (to adequate depth/layers) imo. I kind of like the flat black look. If you want something shiny you would need to get something to cover the (almost same color) primer to finish it off.

I ended up spraying outside the back end of my apartment, no real issues with stuff sticking to it. If you get enough paint on it you will have plenty of room to sand. The finer grit of sandpaper the smoother the paint will be. Its imperative to get at least 3 or more coats on so you can sand with adequate safety (not expose the lower paint), leave enough depth.

*leading edges (peaks) seam to receive less treatment so make sure they get plenty of paint.

-the whole process can take a while as it takes time for each treatment to cure. I believe the fusion takes at least 24-48 hours to settle in. If you have time spread the job over the span of a week, spending some time after work or what ever every other day to apply paint/sand.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the info guys.

I'm going to give the "rattle can" thing a bash. What's the worst that could happen :eek:

1 More question though, is the rule of thumb to always use a clear coat? What are the implications of not using it?
 

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You can use it, You can skip it. Just make sure to use the same kind of paint. Not all clear will work with all base. I use the same brand/line of paint for safety. Having clear gives the paint a bit deeper gloss. more protection. Clear can be wet sanded and buffed. Some bases cant. especially metalics.
 

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I didn't use clear on mine, because I didn't really care if it chipped from rocks and debris... is was spray painted after all. ha Plus, it was like an extra 20 bucks on clear paint, and I'm uber cheap
 

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Thanks for the info guys.

I'm going to give the "rattle can" thing a bash. What's the worst that could happen :eek:

1 More question though, is the rule of thumb to always use a clear coat? What are the implications of not using it?
the worst that can happen is you have to redo it. and idk about you but i ahte fucking sanding it to perfection.
 

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i did mine for fun. every bit of paint you see on the bike is rattle can stuff from walmart/lowes.

i enjoyed doing it but the paint is not very durable and takes FOREVER to dry. if you want to do more than one color, it's definitely not a weekend project.

be careful mixing types of paint, as mentioned above. prep is key. the thicker you put it on, the longer it takes to dry.

if you are patient you can make it look very nice. this took me a few weeks to complete and nobody believes me when i tell them it's rattle can paint.

i plan to repaint fairly soon. this time i'll probably use automotive paint and a compressor/gun.

good luck and have fun


 

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not bad for rattlecan, the rims too got canned?
 

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3.14 reference to pie :) Nice job mang.
I don't get it? unless its that 3.14 sort of looks like PIE in someones rear view mirror? and even then I really dont get it. ;)

And FYI, I do speak 1337...
I LOL'd one day at work when I called our home office in Reno and asked what the ext. for I.T. emergency support was ant the operator said "1337, I'll connect you" I was laughing my ass off.

Ohh, Do you mean Pi?
 

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I did my whole bike with spray cans. Its all in the prepwork.
This. Forget the guys talking about spray guns. The whole point behind rattle can is cheap.

That said, you can get great results with care and lots of PREP.

Here's a few of the different spray jobs I've done on mine.













And as someone mentioned, make sure to use the same types of paint together! Enamel and Lacquer don't play nice together...
 
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