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paint vs paint, rattle can isnt that much cheaper. real paint cost about the same pint vs pint, gallon vs gallon. its the equipment that costs money. butif you have access to that spraying isn't that much more expensive if expensive at all.
 

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paint vs paint, rattle can isnt that much cheaper. real paint cost about the same pint vs pint, gallon vs gallon. its the equipment that costs money. butif you have access to that spraying isn't that much more expensive if expensive at all.
IMO, spending $100 on paint and prep supplies is a lot cheaper than spending that much on top of at least $300 in a bottom-of-the-barrel rig (gun, lines, compressor, etc). Also, a cheapo setup like that isn't going to hold up as well as a quality gun.

No doubt that you can get better quality out of a gun job, but I take issue with the idea that it is cheaper or even in the ballpark regarding cost.

On top of that, the convenience and simplicity of not having to deal with mixing thinner, cleaning the gun, worrying about air pressure and gun settings, etc, etc....

Anyway, just food for thought for the OP.
 

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thats very true, it just depends how many times you plan on spraying. did a car 3 outta 4 times with my friend. paint and mats cost probably around 200.

gun and shit costed a lot more than that.
 

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thats very true, it just depends how many times you plan on spraying. did a car 3 outta 4 times with my friend. paint and mats cost probably around 200.

gun and shit costed a lot more than that.
Agreed. If I knew now that I'd spray my fairings 4-5 times over the past year between street and track fairings I'd have just ponied up for a gun and all.

Probably depends on how much use you can reasonably expect to get out of it. :cheers-004:
 

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not bad for rattlecan, the rims too got canned?
yes but i wouldn't recommend rattlecanning your rims unless you ride street only. when the wheels heat up, so does the pain, and EVERYTHING sticks to them. they get dirty as fuck and are impossible to clean....

that's just my experience


3.14 reference to pie :) Nice job mang.
yeah. thanks :)

I don't get it? unless its that 3.14 sort of looks like PIE in someones rear view mirror? and even then I really dont get it. ;)

And FYI, I do speak 1337...
I LOL'd one day at work when I called our home office in Reno and asked what the ext. for I.T. emergency support was ant the operator said "1337, I'll connect you" I was laughing my ass off.

Ohh, Do you mean Pi?
lol yeah pi
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I'm battling to find 2000 grit sandpaper, the best I could get is 1200 grit. How will this affect the outcome of my paint job?
 

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yes but i wouldn't recommend rattlecanning your rims unless you ride street only. when the wheels heat up, so does the pain, and EVERYTHING sticks to them. they get dirty as fuck and are impossible to clean....

that's just my experience




yeah. thanks :)



lol yeah pi
I was kidding. but yeah, look at 3.14 in the mirror. Its PIE in leet. I lol'd at that.
 

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Overwhelming Splendidery
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I painted the lowers and ram air intake on my bike with spraypaint, I thought it came out awesome:







 

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did you sand it down after you painted? looks orangepeelish
 

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Overwhelming Splendidery
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I didn't. The texture is from the raw plastic underneath... I didn't sand it before because I just wanted to see how the finish was going to be. It was good enough, so I said fuck it.

And it was stolen a month later haha.
 

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I didn't. The texture is from the raw plastic underneath... I didn't sand it before because I just wanted to see how the finish was going to be. It was good enough, so I said fuck it.

And it was stolen a month later haha.
That sucks, bro. The theft I mean, not the paint job. LOL. I painted my entire bike with rattle cans. I chose the Duplicolor touch up cans you can find at automotive parts stores. They have a bunch of different shades to choose from, just make sure you get a can of lacquer clear coat also. If the surface is already painted, you can simply get a bucket of water, put a few drops of liquid dish soap in there, mix it up, and soak a 600 grit piece of paper for a few minutes. The wet sand the shit out of the fairing until it's nice and smooth all over. Clean it up, spray your new color (3-5 coats, 10-15 minutes between coats), let dry, then spray your clear (same process as the color coats, but maybe only 2 or 3 good coats). Let that dry overnight, wet sand with 2000 grit (auto parts store again) until silky smooth, clean and dry, then buff with some compound. That's pretty much it.For cleaning after sanding, I like to use microfiber cloths ($5 for a pack of 4 or 5 at Walmart) and rubbing alcohol (just a litte goes a long way). You can also get tack cloths, but the microfiber was cheap. An orbital buffer works best, but it can be done by hand as well, just gets your forearms a bit tired. I've found that practice definitely makes perfect when it comes to painting. You learn how far away is too far (surface is rough when dry) or too close (runs). You need to take your time with it.And those touch up cans are like $7 a piece and take two can per large fairing. A large can of lacquer clear coat is about $7 as well. The problem I encountered is that sometimes those little touch up cans will leave a small drop of paint on the nozzle after you stop spraying, so when you go to sray again, it shoots that bubble out and splashes on your fairing, which in turn induces rage, profanity, and destruction of things around you. I had to periodically spray one sweep, wipe the nozzle with a rag, then spray another sweep, and repeat. I bought a spray gun and compressor to fix this issue, and to also learn to be a better painter, and maybe even make a few dollars down the road.
 

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I'm battling to find 2000 grit sandpaper, the best I could get is 1200 grit. How will this affect the outcome of my paint job?

i hope you're prepared to put a TON of time into sanding. i tried 1200 and 2000 and actually got a better finish with the 1200 (used rubbing compound, polishing compound, and wax on both).

definitely work your way up to the finer grit sand papers. if you go afer it with 2000 grit first, you will never (ok maybe after a month of sanding) get the finish you expect.


another issue with spray paint, particularly clearing, is that it's extremely thin and you will need to put a bunch of coats of clear on it.
 

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That Fighter Guy
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i hope you're prepared to put a TON of time into sanding. i tried 1200 and 2000 and actually got a better finish with the 1200 (used rubbing compound, polishing compound, and wax on both).

definitely work your way up to the finer grit sand papers. if you go afer it with 2000 grit first, you will never (ok maybe after a month of sanding) get the finish you expect.


another issue with spray paint, particularly clearing, is that it's extremely thin and you will need to put a bunch of coats of clear on it.
If you jump straight to 2000 grit, you'll crap up the paper and it won't sand correctly. The dish soap in the water helps to alleviate this.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Crap, have I being doing it wrong?

I started out by dry sanding with 400, then 600, until the surface was dull.
Gave it a wash, then did 1 very thin coat, waited about 2 hours, wet sanded with 1200 again and did another very thin coat.

I let it dry for about 20 hours or so, wet sanded with 1200, until smooth, then did another slightly heavier coat.

This is where I am at the moment, planning on doing another 2 coats, before switching over to clear.
 

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I think most people do paint, paint, paint, clear clear, clear, clear, then sand, then buff. You can sand solid colors between coats provided you allow ample drying time all though I'm not sure theres any reason to sand at this point. Also, You musn't ever sand metalics. it goofs the paint up something terrible. DON'T ask me how I know that. Just trust me.
 

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That Fighter Guy
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Crap, have I being doing it wrong?

I started out by dry sanding with 400, then 600, until the surface was dull.
Gave it a wash, then did 1 very thin coat, waited about 2 hours, wet sanded with 1200 again and did another very thin coat.

I let it dry for about 20 hours or so, wet sanded with 1200, until smooth, then did another slightly heavier coat.

This is where I am at the moment, planning on doing another 2 coats, before switching over to clear.
No you're fine, man. I always dry sand first to get the surface smooth, but wet sanding is an option as well. Wet sanding can be done before the paint has really fully cured, if that makes sense, to remove orange peel and other imperfections before applying more color or clear. If you get the color on nice and smooth without issues, then clear away without wet sanding. Some prefer to wet sand before they clear, but like anything else, we all have our own methods of doing things.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I think most people do paint, paint, paint, clear clear, clear, clear, then sand, then buff. You can sand solid colors between coats provided you allow ample drying time all though I'm not sure theres any reason to sand at this point. Also, You musn't ever sand metalics. it goofs the paint up something terrible. DON'T ask me how I know that. Just trust me.
Ok, cool, but wouldn't it be a good idea to sand before the clear coats begin?
I'm guessing it will give a smoother looking finish :confused:
 

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Ok, cool, but wouldn't it be a good idea to sand before the clear coats begin?
I'm guessing it will give a smoother looking finish :confused:
If its a metallic color no, I wouldn't. if its a solid color yeah thats fine if the textures too rough. Some people also swear cutting the gloss off the surface of a color coat helps the clear stick better. I don't really buy that though. If the paint and clear are of the same types the solvent in the clear burns in to the color coat a little bit anyway.

If you're doing metallic and the surface is too rough and you have to sand it I would go back and do one more color coat after sanding to hide any wierdness caused by the sanding. What I've seen is sanding a metallic opens the color coat up and goofs the metal flakes up. it just makes it look weird.
 

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That Fighter Guy
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Spray your first layer of clear while the last layer of color is still tacky.

VanHalen is right about the metallic. If you need to wet sand imperfections, do another coat before clear.
 
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