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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some people seem to think that the only option for properly learning how to ride a motorcycle is starting out on a 250; and starting out on anything else (bigger bikes in particular) is just insane. Since some people do not want to spend the rest of their youth waiting on the 08/09 or speculating whether or not Kawasaki will make a ninja 250 wheel chair, they may decide to consider a bigger bike. I have seen some people on this forum get flamed even at the mention of 600cc. Well in my opinion riding like crap is riding like crap regardless of the bike you’re riding. Whether you ride a pocket bike or a Boss Hoss the principles of riding a motorcycle remain the same. Before the flaming starts, just know that I am not promoting starting out on any bike over another because they will all vary based on the rider’s needs and circumstances.

In my opinion and from reading a number of relevant posts, it seems that one of the primary advantages of beginning on a 250 is price opposed to smaller size. The 250 might be the perfect fit for those beginners with smaller budgets who are not sure if they will be fully committed to riding. But if you have the money and want to start with a larger bike I don’t see a problem as long as you learn under the right conditions. “But SuperSport you are nuts how dare you come into the 250 forum and suggest that it is possible for a newb to learn on anything other that a 250……oh no they might decide to buy a Busa”!!! No, riding a motorcycle for the first time down the 405 or in any type of traffic is nuts.

The 250 is not some supernatural machine that will automatically make you a better rider or prevent cars from turning left in front of you, and the Hayabusa is not a space shuttle, it has the same controls and operates on the same principles as the 250. Also remember that everyone from AMA to first time riders are prone to dropping their bike, and if you can afford a $10,000 bike just know that if it is dropped repairs will cost the same whether you are experienced or not. Only proper practice under appropriate conditions can help minimize your chances of having an accident. So if you want that $10,000 bike go ahead, just make sure you are OK with riding in a controlled environment or parking lot for a couple of months.

If you haven’t decided on a bike yet, this is a question you might also want to ask yourself. Would I rather get hit head on by a drunk semi driver while riding a 250 or while riding a Busa.
 

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Well, the 250 is alot easier to learn on then a 600.... One because most people who haven't ridden before cant handle the power of a 600 physically or mentally ... also have you rode a 250??? It is lighter, sits up alittle more, and handles like no other.. Most people say learn on a 250 because they are a easier bike to handle.. cheaper.... good looking... and most of all fun
 

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ratherberiding
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You seem to be missing the point. You can teach a 15 year old how to drive on an 18-wheel semi, but does anyone ever do that? No. A car/truck is more accessible, smaller, lighter,cheaper, more forgiving, easier to operate in general. A new rider needs the LEAST amount of variables as possible.

If you wanna teach your 5 year old daughter to ride a bike on a high wire, go for it...it's def possible. But wouldnt it be easier/more manageable to train her on the ground?
 

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u are so right mr. supersport. i think i'm gonna go buy a busa now. everyone that rides a 250, SELL IT AND GET A BUSA!!!


i can see it now. homepage at gixxer.com


*******NEWSFLASH*********

Suzuki redesigned the Busa. it now rides just a like a 250 only more expensive. Suzuki has big plans for the busa with this new redesign.
















jackass.
 

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Some people learn on bigger bikes, and are just fine. You are correct in saying that the 250 isn't some magical learning tool. The advantage is that it does have a little more fudge room.

Here are a few rookie mistakes I made:
1) Let out the clutch to fast/early in a turn. On a bigger bike, this probably would have high sided me.
2) Came into a soft sand driveway at a slight angle. Low side drop. (luckily, a couple of scratches and a popped housing for the turn signal, not big deal on damage).
3) Poor clutch management while upshifting. On a bigger bike, it probably would have tossed me off the back.

Besides, one of the best stories I have ever heard of was from a driving school somewhere. You, the students, get some kind of high performance car, i.e. Porsche 911 or Lotus, and the instructor gets a Dodge Neon. The instructor still ends up lapping you just because he knows how to drive it.

Ride your 250 to the limit. It will make you a much, much better rider when you step up into a bigger bike, IMHO.

And why not buy an older used one?
 

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I dunno,

I've been riding for a month and a half now, 800 miles, no drops or even any close calls - except for one - I was pulling into a parking space in my parking garage at work, at an angle, so my front tire was approaching the side door of the car in the adjacent space.

For some reason- and I still don't quite know what happened - I blipped the throttle as I was applying the breaks. The bike lurched forward a foot and I instinctively clutched it and got my feet down and let go of the throttle, and I had had my front brakes on - but what would have happened if I had been on a high torque bike? Not sure, but I may have plowed straight into the parked car and ruined my bike, the other car's passender door, and possibly been injured.

That's the kind of newbie coordination glitch that I'd worry about starting on a powerful bike. When something like that happens, your brain kind of blanks for a 2nd or two while it works out what's going on. This sort of error could be potentially more dangerous on a different machine thatn a 250.

I think I'm a safe rider and a pretty fast learner (as I've said, I haven't come close to dropping the bike or crashing), but I made this mistake (and this after hundreds of miles of riding without many unforced errors), but it was controllable because I was on a light, low powered bike.
 

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Respectfully, I think you have totally missed the point.

The primary benefit of the 250 is the size and easier to handle characteristics. The price benefit is secondary.
 

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Respectfully, I think you have totally missed the point.

The primary benefit of the 250 is the size and easier to handle characteristics. The price benefit is secondary.

Honestly, even though most people will flame you, they do it for the better good, they are just to e-thugs to put it in normal understandable, respectable english.

For example, on a 600CC sport bike, you'll be coming out of second gear about the time your rounding 100mph, give it 5-10 seconds and welcome to 150mph or more. Odds are every guy that has owned 600 has used its power at some point in time, though it was probably pretty stupid and illegal, we all do it if we have the power under our hand. Its human nature so don't pretend like you won't ever rip it once or twice. We won't believe you. The diffrence is, those guys that can/have done that, know HOW to abuse/respect [either or] the bike, not let the bike abuse them. Most importantly, self control. After a couple weeks you will feel invincible, you're not.

On a 250 you have more time to think about what your doing. PERFECT example; I ride a black 08' 250. About month ago, I was coming out and heading into the country, it was getting late and traffic was low, I decided to have some fun on a small banked corner at the begining of the country ride. You have to slow to 10-15 mph as its pretty harsh, I clutchless shifted into second and hammered it coming out, when I did this the back tire got a little loose for a second. I didn't think to much of it, yeah I reminded me of my inability, but it wasn't a huge deal, I didn't even think about it 3 minutes after the fact. Had I been on a 600, I would have been taking pictures of my broken helmet, and leg. Not to mention hitting myself for crashing my 10,000 dollar bike within the 1st riding season, and to live up to all my co-workers jokes. I le

The throttle will make you think you are God, quickly. Don't say it won't. You don't know. We ride, you don't [yet].

Thats when it happens. As a begginer rider, most people give you the info, watch out for cars more than anything. But with a new rider on a 600CC, worry about your ego more. I've read more crash stories about people wrecking themselves than the other way around.

Think of it this way, you grow out of your 250R, sell it, they are hot and will sell easy. Move up. You will know how to handle a sportbike going out in traffic, and you will how to handle idiot cars. Then buy your 600 and enjoy it. But don't let your ego lead you, which it will try, your ego will lay your bike down.

The other way around, you buy a 600cc, beautiful, you love it, all kinds of compliments, you wreck the damn thing and you can't ride anymore. All it takes is one blip of the throttle and your on your ass.

Seriously, before you doubt anything we say, remember, I get on a bike EVERY day, and you don't. I/we know what it's like out there, and what it really is on a bike.
 

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My buddy had the same idea you have. He rode mine and then dropped his buddy's 650 the next nite because he wasn't anticipating the weight difference. Now I'm helping him pick up a 250 this weekend. I love my bike. It's nimble as hell. It won't tear ass, but it's fast enough for me to have fun on. I will eventually end up on a 600, but I'm definitely happy with this one. I know that they are scarce now, but if you can find one, jump on it.
 

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Yeah what they said.

Really it sounds like you're just trying to justify getting a 600. Do it. It's fine. If you want to take that risk then do it, no one's stopping you. I think joonyaboy made the point the best. Anyone can start on a bigger bike, but is it the safest thing to do? No, but lots of people do it and live. Some don't.

Whatever you do, have fun man! :)
 

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Oh and secondly, you act like fixing a bike is like fixing a car. In a car you slide off the road doing 60, you lock them up, you maybe need a new bumper, lower ball joint, and fender. no more than 1500 dollars, covered by insurance. Its nothing like that on a bike, welcome to a couple days/weeks in the ER, broken bones, we had a member wreck his 636 and he is an amputee never going to ride again.










^ US soldier was killed.

If you don't understand why I showed you these pictures, re-read my 1st post and think about it. Like said above you if WHOLE heartedly want a 600, get one, i'm not stopping you. But understand that its not any ol' bike. Do what you want, and be safe. GL out there.

I'm just posting this because I feel you are doubting yourself by posting this thread.
 

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^You know whats the weird thing...? I saw a gsxr exactly like that one last year at the wreaker...
 

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damn gixxer guys. lol
 

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'08 ninja 250 is about my 25th bike, i still have five and i ride the 250 most of the time because it's light and fun. for long distances i'd choose my triumph or bmw but not for around town. there are some basics that are much easier to master on a smaller bike, like leaning, braking and just maneuvering the bike around. my first bike had a techumsa 2 1/2 hp motor. j
 

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Again, we needed a new thread about this... again? Unbunch your panties and do what the fuck you want to, it's an internet forum, not religious dogma.
 

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i'll say this..yet AGAIN.

my 636 is putting down the SAME hp at around 5k, that the new is putting down at MAX power.


on an SS bike, its VERY hard to keep it below 5k.

or if you like, its VERY easy to go above 5k...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for yours posts and advice. I do plan on starting with a 250, but I guess waiting on the dealer has provided time for me to 2nd guess myself. The primary point that I was trying to make in my post is not to avocate a 600 as a beginner bike, but rather take sufficient time to practice regardless of the bike you purchase. If my 250 ever arrives, I do not plan on immediatly riding it on the freeway but first learning the bike at home or in a vacant parking lot.
 

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For some reason- and I still don't quite know what happened - I blipped the throttle as I was applying the breaks. The bike lurched forward a foot and I instinctively clutched it and got my feet down and let go of the throttle, and I had had my front brakes on - but what would have happened if I had been on a high torque bike? Not sure, but I may have plowed straight into the parked car and ruined my bike, the other car's passender door, and possibly been injured.

The reason you did it was because you were off balance and while the wheel was turning you went to put your foot down (prolly left foot since the kickstand is on the right) and reached foward and grabbed some throttle on the way to grabbing break. Very Very common mistake. Hell I even warned my girl about doing that one my TTR125 (all of about 12 HP) and she still did it. LOL. Popped a wheelie......... I pulled her off the bike as it was taking off and semi caught it. Brook are you short? Reach is a common problem with doing that and so is being new and not being used to the weight between your legs.

As for the OP. He sounds like a Troll. All I have to say is I started on a 1000 and only crashed because of trying to "Hang with the boys" in the mountains and well.........didn't. Lesson learned. But as I have stated before in other posts, I started on a 1000, and actually went down because I knew I sucked big time.

And Altec, at any point in time you want to take your 636 or your crappy handling 675 ( I know I had one and sold it quickly) and race me on my 250 please let me know. Just name your track. And I'll show you that despite having two bikes you still can't ride either. So stop giving bad advice.
 

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3) Poor clutch management while upshifting. On a bigger bike, it probably would have tossed me off the back.
Admittedly, almost happened to me when I first started riding.

It's very possible to learn on a 250, BUT the learning curve is much steeper. Anyway, it's be said time and again... Maybe there should be a sticky about this subject or something. Get what you want. Anything you get can kill you. Just some a bit easier than others.
 

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The Indifference Engine
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The one thing I do not understand from the OP's post is what he is trying to accomplish...

All of his carefully worded and well thought out arguments are not going to suddenly sway the internet population in general into agreeing with him (especially since his arguments tend to skirt around or outright ignore various concerns of the biker community). So what are we hoping for here?

Do you think that all of a sudden the veterans... the people you come to for advice because they know more about the sport then you currently do are going to slap themselves in the forehead and say, "you know what?? You were RIGHT!" What WERE we thinking?


The MAIN benefit to a 250 is that it allows you to learn to ride without having to focus as much of your concentration on the bike and you can spend more time worrying about the road. It will forgive the mistakes that you make much more readily then a 600 will. Grab a fistfull of throttle on a 600 and you're doing warpspeed the 250 will take a little longer to get there. Grab a fist full of brakes on the 600 and you're going to lock the front wheel. Grab a fistfull on the 250... well you get the idea. It'll forgive you when you fuck up. And as a new rider you're GOING to fuck up.
 
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