Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,000 Posts
I agreed with all of the article.

The most trouble I have had on the street is from car drivers turning left into my path.

The other parts I mostly learned from 8 years of riding dirt bikes, and racing bicycles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Solid article. Its all pretty straight forward stuff but things that you get complacent about as you log more miles.

Thanks for sharing

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I agreed with all of the article.

The most trouble I have had on the street is from car drivers turning left into my path.

The other parts I mostly learned from 8 years of riding dirt bikes, and racing bicycles.
Same here. Although I know this is considered bad due to improper housing and blinding drivers somewhat, but probably the safest thing I did was putting HIDs in my bike. I aimed it down so that it doesn't hit people directly in their mirrors but definitely made a difference. People use to cut into my lanes during night trips, and now everyone sees me coming. Oh and upgrading my brakes to Nissins. Stopping power is way better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
What's funny is, I read that article earlier today. Then tonight I was researching where a ton of views all-of-a-sudden came from on one of my YouTube videos. I finally found the source. It was this exact same article on another site which embedded my video for the section titled "A Car Changes Lane Into You": 10 Common Motorcycle Accidents And How To Avoid Them | RideApart
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,828 Posts
The article does not load.

However most of my close calls where on the first 10k miles from lack of experience, now is mostly routine and uneventful.

and people cutting into my lane is not an issue , it is expected, just squeeze in, let them in or move forward, no biggie, most bikers make a big deal out of this , it is not to me.

people making a left is a concern , so I make sure to position myself in a way so they can see me early and for a long time, and cover the brakes just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
The color of you bike and gear is something simple that i think can help. I don't wear hi-viz stuff but I would think wearing white gear and having a bright colored bike would aid drivers in seeing you better. All black may look good but it doesn't help in getting anyone's attention.

Any thoughts on that theory?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,828 Posts
The color of you bike and gear is something simple that i think can help. I don't wear hi-viz stuff but I would think wearing white gear and having a bright colored bike would aid drivers in seeing you better. All black may look good but it doesn't help in getting anyone's attention.

Any thoughts on that theory?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
I agree , which is why all my bikes are red and my gear is red , people's brain are trained to look for red as a sign of danger , almost every sign or light that people need to look put for is red , even emergency vehicle lights are red , under the same logic I would say green would probably be the worse color to be noticed on, followed by black or gray.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
The color of you bike and gear is something simple that i think can help. I don't wear hi-viz stuff but I would think wearing white gear and having a bright colored bike would aid drivers in seeing you better. All black may look good but it doesn't help in getting anyone's attention.

Any thoughts on that theory?
The color you are wearing doesn't matter when drivers are looking down at their phones. I used to wear all black, and now I'm wearing white, and I haven't seen any difference in what drivers do or the way they respond. They do the same crap when I'm in the huge SUV (Expedition).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,828 Posts
The color you are wearing doesn't matter when drivers are looking down at their phones. I used to wear all black, and now I'm wearing white, and I haven't seen any difference in what drivers do or the way they respond. They do the same crap when I'm in the huge SUV (Expedition).
Under your theory then I don't know why construction workers , cops, firefighters road clean up crews wear reflective bests then since people won't see them anyways ..

Of course the color matters

Oh and white is not necessarily the most visible color btw , yellow and red is

Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Under your theory then I don't know why construction workers , cops, firefighters road clean up crews wear reflective bests then since people won't see them anyways ..

Of course the color matters

Oh and white is not necessarily the most visible color btw , yellow and red is

Sent from Motorcycle.com App
well i guess its good that i ride a red 650R and wear a bright yellow cortec jacket..not to mention my bright pink backpack..(dont laugh/judge.. it works!) i too have read that article and thought it really offered good tips. I ride mostly highway and found a TON of inattentive drivers want to change into my lane. My brother taught me a valuable tip of watching the tire in relation to the white line..keep an eye on the gap between the two. has save my skin numerous times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
I'm not sure there's much that's gonna help you if the driver is staring at the floor. All I meant was that certain colors may help drivers from looking past you. Not much short of your horn will help with a driver who isn't paying attention

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,828 Posts
I'm not sure there's much that's gonna help you if the driver is staring at the floor. All I meant was that certain colors may help drivers from looking past you. Not much short of your horn will help with a driver who isn't paying attention

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
true.

I save the horn to when I think I have no options , usually I rather not have the driver try to correct or panic as I don't trust people's reactions to emergency situations and may cause him to crash into someones else or spin out of control.

The most scary thing for me is to ride behind a high cargo truck or van where I can't see what is going on in the front, I try to get my self out of that situation fast by moving around or even lane splitting, if not possible I fall back and try to leave some distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
true.

I save the horn to when I think I have no options , usually I rather not have the driver try to correct or panic as I don't trust people's reactions to emergency situations and may cause him to crash into someones else or spin out of control.

The most scary thing for me is to ride behind a high cargo truck or van where I can't see what is going on in the front, I try to get my self out of that situation fast by moving around or even lane splitting, if not possible I fall back and try to leave some distance.
Agreed about riding behind trucks! I hate being behind them, and I change that as quickly as possible. They also tend to drop/kick up rocks or anything else on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Agreed about riding behind trucks! I hate being behind them, and I change that as quickly as possible. They also tend to drop/kick up rocks or anything else on the road.
Yup same here. One thing that gets me hesitant is being next to a truck. Either they won't see me and come into my lane or one of their tires blow out and hits me in the face. Either way, a terrible situation. I always speed past them when I get the chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Yup same here. One thing that gets me hesitant is being next to a truck. Either they won't see me and come into my lane or one of their tires blow out and hits me in the face. Either way, a terrible situation. I always speed past them when I get the chance.
Even with smaller trucks, things can be hurled into the air. This is from one of my commutes:

 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top