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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:( Please don't give me a hard time about this; I'm really bummed out about it. First, I love the Ninja 250. Although I admittedly haven't left my neighborhood with it yet, once I get going it's a blast. However, getting going is a problem so severe for me that I'm going to have to throw in the towel if I can't figure it out.

When I took a beginner's riding course this Spring, I attributed my issues starting with being on a junker course bike and I told myself that my bike would be better. Sorry to say, I'm the problem here. For whatever reason, I suck at easing off the clutch and rolling the throttle to get started in 1st gear from a stop. Most of the time, I lurch a bit and the engine dies. I've tried again and again and again and still only rarely get up and started correctly. Obviously it wouldn't be smart for me to head out on the road with this issue.

So, is there a trick or methodology that I should know of? Save me! I really don't want to give up on riding.
 

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yeah, there is a trick to it. be smooth. slowly let the clutch out. SLOWLY. if you let the clutch out slow enough you won't even have to give the bike any throttle at all to get moving. this however wears the clutch faster.

go practice getting moving just by letting the clutch out and giving the bike little to no gas. don't let the clutch out half way and then dump it. just let it out slowly till the lever is all the way out.

once you get moving with little to no throttle input start feeding it some more throttle and releasing the clutch a little faster.

all it takes is practice.
 

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I only started riding 10days ago, having never rode a motorbike. I did a class for the endorsement and found that with the 250 changing gears around and just past the friction zone of the clutch, this makes me make smoother shifts without any issues ... thing is, its all about practice and taking your time. So with all that 10 day experience + 2 day Class went on the main road today and I felt confident I'd be ok and worked out fine.

In 1st gear same process just adding a little throttle and away you go...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I only started riding 10days ago, having never rode a motorbike. I did a class for the endorsement and found that with the 250 changing gears around and just past the friction zone of the clutch, this makes me make smoother shifts without any issues ... thing is, its all about practice and taking your time. So with all that 10 day experience + 2 day Class went on the main road today and I felt confident I'd be ok and worked out fine.

In 1st gear same process just adding a little throttle and away you go...
I actually don't have any trouble shifting once I get myself going thankfully, it's just that initial start that is giving me a heckuva time.

@goingtoscotland I'll definitely try that out, starting up without any (or very little) throttle.
 

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little throttle?

i learned backwards
i gave it throttle first, about 3k rpms, then ease off the clutch

if it sounds like it's about to die i pull clutch back in, give it more throttle and start over

maybe it was just me but when i had my '10 250, it really didnt really have a sweet spot where you can ease off clutch and have it rolling with no throttle

i'd rather have it screaming than die though
 

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I am same as F900EX
I've been on a bike roughly 2 weeks now and first few times i stalled and jerked bike really hard and then I found my "sweet spot" on the throttle. Now I shift gears and take off with ease. My advice mate is never quit something you started unless you 100% its a waste of time. Get out more often and practice. Try giving little more gas and slowly let go of clutch until you find where the "sweet spot" is. Once you figure it out try to learn that area and right before you take off give it little more gas and work your clutch like you practiced. Confidence if your best friend when you are on two wheels.
 

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it takes lots of practice... no tricks, no gimmicks

practice in an empty parking lot (have a friend drive it out there)

just practice taking off. You might not get it the first day, may not even happen the first week, but after much practice you will be able to do it.
 

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They must have put you through the "power walk the bike" exercise in MSF? If not, look it up on the web; plenty of how to videos. Find an open parking lot and practice, practice, practice. Slowly release the clutch while opening the throttle and find the point where the gear engages ... pull the clutch, throttle off, do it again until you move a few feet, pull the clutch, throttle off, ... You'll get the hang of it in no time.
 

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Basically, if you want to learn how to get into first gear with no jerking or stalling you must understand the concept of "riding" your clutch... I've taught my fair share of people to drive stick (manual transmissions) and many of them had all but given up on the idea that they could do it... Not trying to toot my own horn here, but I've got a spotless record so far and most learned in a matter of one lesson... taking no more than 20 to 30 minutes...

If there is someone available to you to demonstrate the idea of "riding" your clutch, you'll get the feel of it pretty quick and will be off to the races in no time... if this response to your thread comes too late and you've already got the hang of it.. Kudo's to you ! If your still having trouble... Give me a holler and I'll go into a little more detail and see if I cant help you work out any difficulty you may be having.... Goodluck !
 

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I'd recommend doing this FTW

Open the trottle to 3-4krpm and hold it steady
Slowly let out the clutch til the bike STARTS inching forward (HOLD IT IN THAT POSITION, don't release any further)
Hold the clutch in that position (the friction zone) and you will slowly start rolling

Tip: if you let the clutch out a little farther the bike will speed up
Use the clutch to control your speed, keep the rpms steady around 3-4k
After you get the bike rolling, stop and practice again

When starting on an incline, hold/drag your rear brake until the bike is moving
 

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What year is the 250? I have a 2009 and I find it similar to an automatic car, may help if you drive. as you slowly release the clutch, just like the brake on a car it slowly pulls to start driving off, you can very slowly than give it gas just like your right foot, but with your hand, the 250 is very forgiving and won't jerk you like a bigger bike. When I first learned, I used to sit in my back yard just letting go of the clutch slowly and gripping it again when it rolled, after I did that and trust me it took many tries and a long time, then I did the same only giving it a little gas, don't give up. You're not the first or won't be the last. I was in your shoes last Spring. Now I hate to drive, just want to ride
 

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What year is the 250? I have a 2009 and I find it similar to an automatic car, may help if you drive. as you slowly release the clutch, just like the brake on a car it slowly pulls to start driving off, you can very slowly than give it gas just like your right foot, but with your hand, the 250 is very forgiving and won't jerk you like a bigger bike. When I first learned, I used to sit in my back yard just letting go of the clutch slowly and gripping it again when it rolled, after I did that and trust me it took many tries and a long time, then I did the same only giving it a little gas, don't give up. You're not the first or won't be the last. I was in your shoes last Spring. Now I hate to drive, just want to ride

wat
 

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Hey, this may help you. ;o
Skip to about 5 minutes to get to the part where you start ;D
YouTube - ‪How to ride a motorcycle (pt1)‬‏
^^ BlinkyCab is awesome. Honestly to me it sounds like most of your problem is you get on your bike and expect to stall it, get worked up about it and cause yourself to make the same mistake over and over. Watch Blinky's vlog, forget your previous issues and practice what he does in the video.
 

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That is probably the hardest part of learning to ride but I gotta say that you should not throw in the towel because of this. Once you learn it, you will laugh at how incredibly easy it is so letting this issues stop you from riding is not an option.

The issue for me was (and I started on a 250 as well) that I was afraid to loop it by giving it too much gas. I was new to bikes and didn't realize how almost impossible that is on a 250.

My advice is this: Don't worry about giving it too much gas. This bike is not going to take off like a rocket on one wheel all the way down the street. Don't be afraid to open the throttle some when you want to get moving. That, coupled with easing the clutch out rather than dumping it, will get you going with no problems.

-Pat
 

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As everyone has said, practice, practice, practice.

I'm with NinjaGuy.
I'm wondering if the reason it's stalling is because you're not giving it any gas. Ninja250s need a bit of kick to get going from a standstill.

The key is to NEVER dump the clutch. Let it out bit by bit. You may wear your clutch a bit more than usual when you're practicing but you won't scare yourself silly by taking off like a rocket.
Once you've got that down, you can start working on refining the amount of rpms needed so you minimize wear to your clutch when taking off from a standstill.

Take it to a parking lot and practice.

Did you pass the MSF course? Because, I'd be surprised if they let you pass when you were having issues like that.
 
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