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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

The Check Engine light on my 2017 Ninja 650 just came on, and I have a code 33. I see that this means a faulty O2 sensor. I would appreciate any guidance on diagnosing this further and repairing this error.

Thanks,
Aravind
 

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First questions.
Is the Exhaust system standard ?
Has the Bike a restriction kit fitted ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks so much for getting more info, Kev. Yes, the exhaust system is standard.
 

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You're looking for part number 21176-0824. Depending on how many miles on the bike it may be time for a new one. Make sure you're sitting down when you get the price though. Used ones are hit or miss since they might be 100 miles from burning out too.

Run race gas or leaded fuel lately? That messes them up.
Check the wiring to make sure it's not chafed or shorted out somewhere. Trace it back up to the plug and make sure that's connected. Sometimes the wires can get ripped out if they snag on something sticking out of the ground.

I just get rid of the stupid thing at the first hint of trouble with an O2 eliminator. I've had good luck with this guys stuff (see link). Shipping takes a bit coming from Canada but the price is pretty good.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks so much! The sensor is so freaking expensive! I am seriously considering the O2 eliminator. Noob question - what does the O2 sensor do, and would an eliminator lead to other problems down the road?

Also, my ride only has 3000 miles and has only been fed unleaded fuel. So I'm surprised it went bad so quickly.
 

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I think you might have something else wrong there. With regular fuel it is strange that it went bad so quick. Did you check the wiring?

An O2 sensor (Oxygen sensor) checks the oxygen level in your exhaust and with that information your ECU can math out your AFR (Air Fuel Ratio). An O2 eliminator is usually for guys who are tuning their bikes and changing the fuel tables (dyno, power commander, bazzaz, etc). That way the stock O2 sensor doesn't get a sniff of your modifications and try to cancel it out.

I don't really think an eliminator is the solution for you. Feel like there is something else going on in there that needs to be checked.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks so much for sharing your insight on this, Brad! Thought I'd circle back and let you know that the light just turned off on its own. Looks like there may have been some loose connection.
 
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