Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I am trying to get my frame/swingarm as nice as yours, although I keep polishing and it doesnt seem to get any shinier, any tips or could you give me an estimate of how much time you put into that bad boy? thanks a lot
:D

1995 red and purple ninja zx6r
1997 camaro v6 3.8
1987 honda nq50! oh ya!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
First off, don't repeat what I'm about to tell you, it's all sort of a trade secret... okay?

The work load isn't really that bad. It's just a lot of prep. work, and time consumption with details. I took care of protecting my wiring, and hoses and such... so that's a good place to start. I also took my exaust, and radiator off - I don't know how far you're willing to go. Taking the subframe off helps for a bit of work space as well... it makes it easier to get around the subframe too! But that's about where I started. Keeping the bike frame warm is also going to help a good deal. The metal will be far more co-operative. I actually had to take a break this winter - when the polish was freezing to the frame, I knew I was in trouble.

Now, assuming that you've already got the paint stripped from the frame, and the rough cast area is been sanded real smooth - you're through the hard stuff. From there, I used steel wool to rub the frame to bring up the finish. Start at 0 gauge, and work your way to 0000 gauge. It's just like going from coarse, to medium to fine. A tiny amount of moisture on the aluminum is going to help you bring out the shine. Just breathe on the frame, and then rub it in. You'll be able to feel the effect... It's going to feel real soft when you start, and then as the wool begins to work the metal, it will begin to change texture. Almost feel rough, like it's digging in. Don't worry, you're not doing any damage. You may even want to try redoing the whole frame just for the sake of keeping it consistant.

From there, use the medium wool, and go back over everything you rubbed with the coarse wool. You'll bring out a small amount of the finish... and you can tell if you should go back over any parts with the coarse wool. Never be afraid to go back over any area. You'll be sorry if you don't. Keep your eyes peeled for cloudy spots. That's where you're going to need to go back over it will a different grade of wool.

Once that stage is complete, you'll need to go over it with the fine wool. It's super smooth, and you'll notice that it comes out with a degree of shine. You're going to repeat a few steps here by going back over everything, but at least it's consistant, and you'll shine all over. If you're happy with your refinishing job at that point, try using the fine grade wool to apply the aluminum polish. This will help to buff out any of the larger scuffs that were left behind. Again, cover your entire work area to stay consistant.

From here, grab an old towel, and begin rubbing on the aluminum polish. The more you rub, the better it's going to come out. I lost track of how many times I rubbed my frame down. But every time I did it, it looked better and better. To the point where CdnNinjaZX6R was getting a little annoyed with me. Heh. You can take a bit of a short-cut by using a buffing wheel. I've got a heavy duty one that I bought from my supplier at work. I would recommend a Makita, or Black & Decker... I've got a DeWalt, and I would be lost without it. Use a regular wool pad, crank up the RPM's as high as they'll go, and set it loose. Just be careful not to grab any tight spots. I came close to ripping off some hoses. Not cool... Once you're polishing at this stage, just keep going over it 'til the aluminum polish has disappeared. Sooner or later you should be able to see the reflection of yourself smiling at what you've done. After that, a good coat of carnuba wax should help keep the shine and protect it from water marks, and other road shyte.

I think I'm going to go back over mine a few times tomorrow just to watch CdnNinjaZX6R squirm!

Time means nothing. It's a matter of doing what it takes to get it the way you want it. If you rush it, it's going to show. It's only going to be as good as you make it.

If I don't get anymore time to work on it this season, I'll definetly be busy with the up-keep, but I'll probably be causing accidents next season when I get the whole thing apart again to polish it some more!

I'll be around for more advice if you need any. Take care, and good luck! Post some pictures for us to follow your progress.

Speaking of progress; if you would like to see the varying stages, check out CdnNinja's website. www.schiebel.ca You can fish around on there and see the photos we took along the way.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Where's the fun in that? My way was dirt cheap... and I learned a pant load. Plus, the job that you do will be great! You're not going to do a shitty job on your own rig! It comes out as good as you want it to...
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top