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I've isolated the left front rotor. The right front rotor seems fine. How do I know? I took out the left caliper and the wheel spun freely.
Then I put it back on and now it binds. I only get 3-4 revolutions then it stops. The bike is still rideable but I know I will get an uneven brake wear on the pads. these are new pads btw. Anyway, does anyone know what causes warps in the first place??
 

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Originally posted by 636chance
I've isolated the left front rotor. The right front rotor seems fine. How do I know? I took out the left caliper and the wheel spun freely.
Then I put it back on and now it binds. I only get 3-4 revolutions then it stops. The bike is still rideable but I know I will get an uneven brake wear on the pads. these are new pads btw. Anyway, does anyone know what causes warps in the first place??
1) Heat. Unlikely in a street environment unless you ride around with the brakes on or something is binding.

2) Disk and disk holder gets whacked, like when changing tires.

3-4 revolutions after letting go of the wheel sounds pretty good to me. The pads are supposed to be in contact with the disk at all times and will cause a little drag.

Instead, try this method: Hold something like a pen or ruler against the fork. Keep it from touching the disk by like 1mm or so. Then slowly spin the wheel and watch the 1mm gap. If the gap increases and decreases or the disk touches the pen, it means that there is some warpage. Please note, there is an acceptable amount of warpage, look in the shop manual for the exact spec.

good luck!
 

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I had a 1990 FZR600 and when I bought it the front rotor were shimming. I just put new ones on it, later I
found out that the person I got it from used to do indos all day long on it. He would slam the front brake
to get the back wheel off the ground, that is what caused the rotors to worpe.

--Anthony
 

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I have an easyer soultion, take the rotor off and flop it on your kitchen counter and look under it, if you can see under it, its warped.

Gotta love being a broke *******.
 

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Originally posted by Tach Happy
I have an easyer soultion, take the rotor off and flop it on your kitchen counter and look under it, if you can see under it, its warped.

Gotta love being a broke *******.

What if the counter isnt flat?
 

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Or you could just stop by the bike shop and have them take a quick peek at it for you! Would save a shit load of time rather than trying to take it off and putting it on your uneven countertop. They could also tell you if it's time to actualy replace them (too thin). You say you have new pads, you def don't want them to wear uneven. Use your rear brake more too. It's possible that you are relying more on your front brake. Frequent stops (stop/go traffic) and if there is a lot of downhill braking def will cause those rotors to heat up quick! But I'm sure the guys at the bike shop wouldn't mind measuring them for you (unless you know someone who works in a garage who can actually measure the specs for you). Good luck which ever method you decide to use. There are some great ways mentioned to check it yourself!:)
 

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Originally posted by racedoll
Like everyone else said heat, but I also say cheap rotors.
"The Doll" is correct - cheaper rotors tend to be thinner or not as high quality steel. Since they heat up faster (and hotter), and don't dissipate the heat well, they will wapr more.

Vented/drilled rotors will shed the heat faster, since they have more surface area to radiate the heat.

ps. Welcome to the forum, doll...
 

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Originally posted by onereckless1
Use your rear brake more too. It's possible that you are relying more on your front brake.
What for? The rear brake will get you killed. Talk to any professional and/or track rider and you will find that the rear brake is hardly ever used, unless backing into corners is their style.

My guess is the rim was dropped during a tire change or the bike has fallen.
 

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Neither do I but with the 260 mm or whatever rotors up front I cant believe they are going to warp from normal use on a street bike. We arent getting the full story.
 

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Originally posted by MadViking

What for? The rear brake will get you killed. Talk to any professional and/or track rider and you will find that the rear brake is hardly ever used, unless backing into corners is their style.
Well that's total bullshit. The rear brake is a very effective tool when used correctly. It's true that if you're really hard on the front brake, the rear gets light (or airborne), so it's easy to lock up the rear, but who brakes that hard on the street (normally)? I never have issues with locking the rear because I've learned how to finesse it. A light drag of the rear brake settles the bike down wonderfully on corner entrances and can be used to tighten a line. I've been known to even drag a little rear brake and start applying throttle at the same time in the twisties.

I forget which MotoGP champ broke his right foot/ankle and had a thumb-activated rear brake setup because he relied on it so much. Think I read that in "Sport Riding Techniques" by Nick Ienatsch (great book).
 

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**** Doohan, if I'm not mistaken. He's a professional racer who raced at the top of the sport using his back brake. He's not been killed so far, but then you'd need a big metal-press like in the Terminator, he's more machine now than man.
 
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