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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry to ask such a basic question, but I am away from home and I need to order some parts so I can prep in time for a trackday.

How much brake fluid is required for a full flush? I will be putting on new lines and pads, and I want to completely empty the system of the old fluid before I put the new fluid in. This is for the FRONT only!

Bike is a 2005 ZZR 600.

Thanks.
 

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You don't empty system first, just creates more problems. Just leave the fluid in the reservoir and calipers it does not matter. Install the new lines and start bleeding, by the time you get fresh fluid from the MC to the calipers all the old fluid will be gone anyway.
 

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would that not create the world's biggest air bubble in your new lines? Just asking cause I drained mine completely before swapping lines.
 

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You put in new lines you automatically have a bubble. The more old fluid you leave in the system the less air you introduce.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm putting new lines in, so those are going to be bone dry anyway.

I meant that I was going to let it gravity bleed until the reservior was empty, not that I was going to completely drain it; I just wanted to make sure it was clear I wasn't just doing a standard bleed.

Thanks everyone!
 

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Keep the new lines dry. Do not hook them up to the old fluid. Break the banjo bolts and replace the crush washers with new. Empty M/C of old oil. Replace the M/C onto the bars. "Bench Bleed" the M/C by pouring the new brake fluid into the reservoir. Hold your finger over the banjo hole, and press the lever. Each time you press the lever, roll your finger off the banjo hole a little, so you release the air. Once the lever is pulled in and ready to release, cover the bj bolt with your finger again. Cycle thru the sequence until you see the same color fluid that comes out of the new fluid container. Have the bj bolt, the crush washers*, and new line ready to install into the leaking M/C's banjo hole. Tighten the bj bolt on the M/C enough to seal under slight pressure. Now, hold the new line's banjo ends closed with your fingers, and repeat the bench bleed process again. Once all bubbles are out of the new lines, have bj bolt and crushers* ready for caliper installation. Never let the M/C empty of new fluid! Open the caliper bleed screw. By now, the M/C should be filled with new fluid, the bj bolt at the M/C should be lightly seated, while the bj bolt at the caliper should be properly positioned and torque to specs. All that is left is to bleed the old oil out of the caliper. Do this by continually filled with new fluid, while the caliper's bleed screw remains open. Keep pumping the lever until you see clear fluid with/out bubbles coming from the caliper. Close caliper screw. Pump the M/C for a pedal? If there is still a soft pedal, then now is the time to break the M/C's bj bolt slightly, pull the lever in, then watch for the final upper clearing of air at the top of the new brake line? Keep breaking the bj bolt open and closed (bench bleed style) until the line to M/C clears. Be ready to position the line to your frame/clearances, then torque to specs. Clean all brake areas. Literally press and hold the brake lever very, very hard. Hold that pressure, and look for leaks at the bj bolts, eye all up and down the new line for oil leaks, or leaks in line itself, etc.? No leaks, hard pedal?... Congrats!

*Crush washers are placed with the flats against the calipers/M/C's surface. Banjo bolt head-to-washers... are placed where the round side will crush under the banjo's special bolt head.
 
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