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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright well i've been doing a whole bunch of research on suspension tuning and am still not happy with what i have. My front end pushes pretty hard and the front tire washes in a moderately tight 60 mph turn.

A few sites i used as reference were:
http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_0402_susp/index.html
http://www.sportrider.com/bikes/146_street_bike_suspension_settings/index.html#kawasaki
http://www.kawiforums.com/showthread.php?t=108982 (of course)
and a few others here and there

I'm 6'1" and weight 160lbs with gear on. The bikes a 05 636 with stock suspension.

I pretty curious to what you have your settings at as a reference to start from. If you could post your settings or and comment that could help me out.

Thanks in advance guys,

Austin
EndoZ
 

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yut uuuuugh!
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I'm 6'1" and weight 160lbs with gear on.
:eek: damn dude...... I'm 6'3", and my race weight (for cycling) was 180 and that was crazy...

I had JD_gun13 help me out, and he used the racetech (?) method... but I know it's the same method that was written about in sport rider. I would see if he can give you any tips... he knows more about this than a lot of people I've talked to....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i guess i maybe a bit more now but 18yrs old+fast metabolism=skinny as hell and can't gain weight for shit.
 

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Use the sportrider settings as a start accept you need to set the sag to your wieght so rear 30 to 40mm. The the front fork sag get an large O ring cut and super glue together around the fork. this will give you a true indication of your fork travel. Now push the O ring against the fork dust cover now go and ride your bike brake hard do your stoppies and you want the O ring to be 10 to 20mm from the bottom before it bottoms out. Unfortunately this is only the starting point. Always start by fine tune the front first then the rear and one change at a time so I am talking about your comp and rebound damping.
 

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I found sport riders set up way too soft even though it was "setup" for my weight...bike just wouldn't turn and everything felt sluggish. I used stock settings, then firmed up some of the dampening and compression.
 

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You think he's skinny? I'm 6' 0" and weigh 135 soaking wet. I've played and played with the dampening on my 06 636 for over a year now, but the bottom line is it's just too stiffly sprung for my light ass. I can't even get 10 mm of sag on the rear with the preload as far out as it goes.

I plan on having the whole suspension gone through and re-valved/re-sprung for my weight in the next couple of months.

I love being a light weight...........my 180 lb riding buddy with an 07 gixxer 750 doesn't like it so much :)
 

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I had a race guy who specializes in suspension set mine up for my weight and riding style. Must be someone in your area that would do it. I think it only cost me $20. It's pretty stiff now but handles great.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't start with the sportrider settings. I tried them a couple months ago when I was in the same boat as you but didn't like them.

Luckily for you, I am 6'0" 160-165 lb. so my settings should be pretty useful for you.
Here's what I would do if I were you:
Buy a 9.4kg/mm racetech rear shock spring since the stock one is for a 220lb. rider. It's about $100 and you can easily install it yourself. That's what I did and it's much more comfortable and feels right.
Second, set your sag (if you don't know how, just ask and we'll point you in the right direction). Mine is about 35mm front, 33mm rear. But what's more important than the numbers themselves is that the bike feels geometrically balanced, so don't be afraid to stray from those numbers in order to make your bike feel and handle better.

Whether you switch the spring or not, here are my settings for a starting point:
front compression damping (the screws at the bottom of the forks): 0.75 turns from all the way clockwise
front rebound damping (the screws at the top of the forks): 1.25 turns from all the way clockwise
rear compression damping (the screw near the top of the shock): 0.675 turns from all the way clockwise
rear rebound damping (the screw near the bottom of the shock): 12 clicks from all the way clockwise

These settings were not set by a professional, I tuned my suspension myself by feel and reading my tires, and I'm not guaranteeing that this will be your magical setup, but since you're my same size these settings should feel better than stock. Good luck!
 

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never go off of someone else's settings. mileage and road condition all effect the wear and tear of a suspension system. You need your bike set up for YOU.

1st: put on all your gear, and set the static sag. that is the first and most important step. If you don't set the sag, you will never be able to tune your suspension.


2nd: fine tune the compression bound and rebound settings. These are found [FRONT] on the top of the triple tree (you will need a flat head screw driver), and on the bottom of the shock mount. Set the bound and rebound settings in the middle, and then adjust them 1/4 turn at a time (all of them at the same time). Gradually work up to a stiffer setting, but make sure the bike is not hopping through corners. You want it smooth, yet tight. If it is too stiff, you could hit a lump in the middle of a turn, and the suspension wont absorb the "bound" quick enough, and then you are nearly airborne in the middle of a turn.
 

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never go off of someone else's settings. mileage and road condition all effect the wear and tear of a suspension system. You need your bike set up for YOU.

1st: put on all your gear, and set the static sag. that is the first and most important step. If you don't set the sag, you will never be able to tune your suspension.


2nd: fine tune the compression bound and rebound settings. These are found [FRONT] on the top of the triple tree (you will need a flat head screw driver), and on the bottom of the shock mount. Set the bound and rebound settings in the middle, and then adjust them 1/4 turn at a time (all of them at the same time). Gradually work up to a stiffer setting, but make sure the bike is not hopping through corners. You want it smooth, yet tight. If it is too stiff, you could hit a lump in the middle of a turn, and the suspension wont absorb the "bound" quick enough, and then you are nearly airborne in the middle of a turn.

Everyone needs a starting point...
I never once said "use my settings and don't change them at all" but I guarantee I took some of the work out of tuning from stock.
 

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well from stock they are set for a 150lb rider & your not too far from that, i readjusted mine to stock & adjusted from there, give or take a click here or there, the sag was pretty much dead on (surprisingly) so i didn't have to do much at all, if your washing out in a turn like that or something relatively easy look at your rebound settings & start w/ that first, i would go sag, rebound, preload & then compression
 

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well from stock they are set for a 150lb rider & your not too far from that, i readjusted mine to stock & adjusted from there, give or take a click here or there, the sag was pretty much dead on (surprisingly) so i didn't have to do much at all, if your washing out in a turn like that or something relatively easy look at your rebound settings & start w/ that first, i would go sag, rebound, preload & then compression
I find that strange. The stock settings had my sag over 50mm both front and rear. But every bike is different. It's important to note that they are set for a 150lb rider AND PASSENGER. huge difference
 
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