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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I would like to inquire about tire pressure (psi)
The street is not for the track
My weekend trip to the city
Pirelli Diablo Russo 3
120/60/17
180/55/17
 

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You should go with whatever the swingarm lists. That should also be in the user manual. The one listed on the sidewall is the maximum pressure that the tire was designed to handle. The one on the swingarm is what the motorcycle is designed to ride with. Unless you do something super crazy with the tires, like mount a car tire, you should just go with the motorcycle recommendation.
 

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It's also worth noting, that there's nothing set in stone about this stuff. Being a bit under the recommendation is probably not going to be a problem. Being slightly under will improve grip a bit, but generate more heat and reduce the lifespan of the tire. It will also negatively impact the tire's ability to maintain it's profile while leaned over. And being a bit above will somewhat mitigate that. For the time being, you want to shoot for the swingarm pressure.

Personally, I tend to run a few PSI below the recommendation and it's been fine. I've got a Ninja 250, so even with the pressure being a bit low, the number of miles I get out of my tires has been insane. Larger bikes will likely see a bigger difference though.

The big thing though is to avoid getting too far away from the recommendation a couple PSI above or below is probably not an issue, but as you go further out, the results can be less and less predictable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You should go with whatever the swingarm lists. That should also be in the user manual. The one listed on the sidewall is the maximum pressure that the tire was designed to handle. The one on the swingarm is what the motorcycle is designed to ride with. Unless you do something super crazy with the tires, like mount a car tire, you should just go with the motorcycle recommendation.
Thank you for the clarification
Explanation on the frame that the pressure should not exceed 40 psi
But I'm looking for the perfect street pressure to keep tire life, good balance and non-slip
 

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Thank you for the clarification
Explanation on the frame that the pressure should not exceed 40 psi
But I'm looking for the perfect street pressure to keep tire life, good balance and non-slip
If you're nervous about getting it write, you can contact the tire manufacturer with the tire size you've got and the specific model. They usually have that figured out and are more than happy to help people use their products.

I'm not sure what motorcycle that is, but you should be able to google the recommended tire pressure. It's not likely to be the same for the front and rear tires. Usually the front is a bit lower than the rear because of how motorcycles handle, especially when accelerating.
 

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Thank you for the clarification
Explanation on the frame that the pressure should not exceed 40 psi
But I'm looking for the perfect street pressure to keep tire life, good balance and non-slip
Read the manual and follow the recommended pressures. Add 1 - 2 Psi if you are overweight or carry passengers often and 3 - 4 with the bike fully loaded for a road trip.
The correct way to measure tire pressure is when the tires are cold so a pump can make your life much easier. I have one that stops automatically at the set pressure - even easier ;)
 

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I'm on Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa's on a 2009 ZX-6R, and I run them at 31/31 or 32/32 on the street (around the same numbers for the track as well or 30/31 (a little higher on the front because of more braking forces)).
 

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I worked in the automotive industry for over 5 years. I have encountered too many people whom are unaware of how important proper tire air pressure is. The tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) in your vehicle is an aid to this matter. It is only there to let you know about drastic differences in air pressure between your tires. We have to remember that the tires on our vehicles are what dictate how well we will be able to handle said vehicle. Tires are what make contact with the road, thus should be the forefront of our safety priorities. Rather not have to use your seatbelt because you were able to brake in time, than total your vehicle due to an over inflated tire.
Yes, i said that correctly, over inflated. When we over inflate our tires, we decrease the surface area that makes contact with the road. In turn, reducing friction between the tire and road. This increases our distance to come to a snaptube vidmate stop, and how much under/over steer we experience. Over inflated tires are also more suceptable to blow outs due to the already high pressure. Over inflated tires suffer decreased life time, dangerous cracking, and decreased traction.
 

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Race pressures are fine for the street even long term riding one up with no luggage. Better ride, better grip. Just remember that if you run track pressures, you should check them before each ride. If you lose a few pounds due to atmospheric conditions, you could be walking the line. A few pounds more in each tire will give you a margin.
 

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Race pressures are fine for the street even long term riding one up with no luggage. Better ride, better grip. Just remember that if you run track pressures, you should check them before each ride. If you lose a few pounds due to atmospheric conditions, you could be walking the line. A few pounds more in each tire will give you a margin.
No they are not, it depends on the type of tire and riding. The sidewalls of most sport - road tires cannot handle the on road punishment when under inflated and can cause dangerous behavior and certainly more wear and increased fuel consumption. On track you can experiment as much as you like but the road is not a racetrack and not all riders are dragging their elbows on their way to their jobs. Please follow the instructions of the manual with a few psi more with the bike loaded.
 

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No they are not, it depends on the type of tire and riding. The sidewalls of most sport - road tires cannot handle the on road punishment when under inflated and can cause dangerous behavior and certainly more wear and increased fuel consumption. On track you can experiment as much as you like but the road is not a racetrack and not all riders are dragging their elbows on their way to their jobs. Please follow the instructions of the manual with a few psi more with the bike loaded.
The pressures we are talking about are NOT underinflated!
 

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Running those high pressures is only for heavily loaded bikes. Riding a sportbike one up is perfectly fine running recommended track pressure for the road. I have ridden spirited for over a decade and have many, many sport bikes I have setup for people the same way. There are several benefits to running lower pressures, but the lawyers have everone scared. I encourage you to try it for a short time at 34F, 34R and see the difference in traction and smoother ride. You may decide to go a little lower, or go back higher because there wasnt much difference. Just read the tire manufacturers track pressure specs and be smart. Check pressures often, make sure your suspension is baselined as far a sag and clickers (pm me if you need numbers), add pressure for 2 up, baggage etc...Dont be afraid to experiment a little. This is how we learn. Try it on your next short ride and report back.
 

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That's really bad information, what to do with the most important part of bike safety that keep us in contact with the road? Knock yourselves out and experiment on the public road network! What can possibly go wrong? This is a public forum and we must think before writing because we can potentially put fellow rider's lives in danger.
 
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