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Discussion Starter #1
I posted on this before, but could I use seafoam in the vaccum lines going to the carbs? Ive used it before in the gas tank, but i think it might be more effective in the carb directly. I saw a youtube video on somebody using it, but wanted to know if anybody here has used it directly in the carb and if it worked with idling issues. I have cleaned the carbs before but I don't want the hassle of taking it all out again. I saw that you just drain the carb bowls, and directly pour seafoam into the gas line.... Is that right and safe? any input would be greatly appreciated.
 

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It will clean the intake, valves and pistons going through the vacuum lines, but not the internal workings of the carb its self if you out it through a vac line. Just put a good heavy dose in the tank is best
 

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The Indifference Engine
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An idle problem can be caused by more than just a partially clogged idle jet. Tossing seafoam at it is not the best answer.

As for dumping it into your vacuum lines. Those lead to the intake, not the float bowl. As vanhalen said it might clean things up in there. But I think dumping any fluid, especially a cleaner into the cylinder is a bad idea.

Filling your float bowls with pure seafoam will not help because it will just air in the float. It needs to make it up into the jet to clean it. The engine must be running for the seafoam to get there. What you're suggesting is like trying to wash dishes by putting two inches of soapy water in the bottom of a sink, installing the drying rack and then piling the dishes on top of it.

Ultimately, your best bet is always to dissassemble and check for problems: loose boot, cracked vacuum line, messed up float level, gummed idle jet, damaged idle adjuster, misadjusted throttle or clutch cables, damaged carb linkage, damaged boot seal, clogged float needle. There are lots of potentials.
 

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+1 on Sev's post. As "great" as Seafoam may be, nothing beats a good disassemble and clean for any carbs.

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That Fighter Guy
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Seafoam should be used as a preventative measure, not a corrective one. Get a service manual and get your hands dirty. All too many people are afraid to work on their own stuff that they want to dump a "magical" formula into their tank to solve their problems. Once you get into removing and disassembling a carburetor, you'll kick yourself for not learning sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
yeah, ive done it before its a pain in the ass removing everything. last time i couldn't get the bike to crank again, i think its because i forgot to put gas into the carb before installing it again. I will be removing the carbs today and cleaning them, since I am off for the next 2 days.
 

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That Fighter Guy
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yeah, ive done it before its a pain in the ass removing everything. last time i couldn't get the bike to crank again, i think its because i forgot to put gas into the carb before installing it again. I will be removing the carbs today and cleaning them, since I am off for the next 2 days.
The fuel pump should fill the floats back up as you crank the bike. It takes a few extra cranks to get it to fire up the first time. That's how my 600 works anyways. I don't see why your 250 would be different.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah, i finally cleaned the carbs and they didn't look too bad, one side was getting dirty so i think that was the problem. after hours of struggling to get everything back together i got it working, sounds 100x better, and the response is very quick. I feel like I have a new bike now. I am so happy I went ahead and took these apart and got it working right now. thanks everybody for the help and input!
 
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