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your assistance needed..

Its sounds like you know alot about riding and bike .If you can help me great if not thanks anyways . On my 04 kawasaki zzr 250 ex or maybe on all bike my gas open and close lever has pri . on /off /res I figure res ios reserve but what is pri. Primewr when you first start the bike..? Again maybe stupid question but i AM A NEWBIE TO THE BIKE WORLD
 

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ratherberiding
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Discussion Starter #42
I'm not completey knowledgeable in that bike, but I'm pretty sure PRI is for PRIME. Sometimes if I haven't ridden the bike for a few weeks the carbs will dry out and it won't start...you'll have to put it on the PRI position to refill them, and it starts right up...

The fuel will constantly flow on prime. RES is reserve for when you are about to run out of gas you can switch to reserve and get a few more miles out of it. On only lets the fuel flow when the engine is running.

Use PRI only when you're going to start up your motorcycle after having let it sit a while, or after having disconnected the fuel line. As soon as the 'cycle is runnin again, then switch it over to ON or RES.


I'm 99% sure that's the answer, but feel free to make a thread about it in the Two Wheeled Discussion forum or in the 250 forum
 

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Powerhungry
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I'm not completey knowledgeable in that bike, but I'm pretty sure PRI is for PRIME. Sometimes if I haven't ridden the bike for a few weeks the carbs will dry out and it won't start...you'll have to put it on the PRI position to refill them, and it starts right up...

The fuel will constantly flow on prime. RES is reserve for when you are about to run out of gas you can switch to reserve and get a few more miles out of it. On only lets the fuel flow when the engine is running.

Use PRI only when you're going to start up your motorcycle after having let it sit a while, or after having disconnected the fuel line. As soon as the 'cycle is runnin again, then switch it over to ON or RES.


I'm 99% sure that's the answer, but feel free to make a thread about it in the Two Wheeled Discussion forum or in the 250 forum
i dont KNOW that bike either. but id have to say thats probably right.

also use PRI when bringing it out of "winter" storage. if the fuel was drained, this will allow the bowls to fill, before attempting to start it. probably its designation.

does tha manual outline a "storage" proecedure? IF it does, id guess draining the carbs is a step;)

again...if any of this is wrong, feel free to correct it.
 

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I tried to take an MSF course, but they don't have 'em here, so I went to TEAM OREGON, but they wouldn't let me take the basic rider course with my new ZX-14R. I showed them, though. I did a big ol' burnout, then got scared and popped the clutch and looped the bike right in the middle of their range, and got a concussion and totaled my bike.

No, wait! I'm just kidding, honest. I'd recommend the MSF courses (or TEAM OREGON, or Idaho STAR, or whatever is available in your area) to anyone. Even if you have been riding all your life you can learn something valuable and have fun doing it.

For experienced riders, I also highly recommend Keith Code's California Superbike School - it is humbling but will make you a better rider.
 

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Now, there’s always the debate about getting a 600 as a first bike. Sure, you could do it. I’d say maybe 50% of people out there could handle it. But there is no way to tell if you are one of those people. Plus if you drop that one, you will cry a little more :D The 600’s are less forgiving and tempt you to go faster when you should be more focused on learning control.
250 is good for starters, dont want this to happen to you, do you?

http://www.kawiforums.com/showthread.php?t=103105

As always:

Good Education, Good Intention and Good Gear.
 

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Just thought I'd share my experience.

Back in February my buddy showed me his motorcycle and rode it in to work a few times. I was instantly in love with motorcycles. He told me the same thing you guys have said, "start with a 250, cheap and forgiving". (as a minor side note, after 3 years of riding he STILL hasn't gotten his license :rolleyes:) I went out and bought a 1989 Ninja 250, and it was a piece of crap. Engine was messed, electrical was messed, brakes were messed, etc. Only thing going for it was that it was only $300.

Since my bike didn't run, my buddy let me borrow his 1987 Ninja 750, which according to Kawasaki has about 70hp and 100lbs more than the 250. Almost a year later I *HAVE NEVER WRECKED OR DROPPED IT* (I shortly bought it off my buddy). HOWEVER, IMHO I would have avoided a LOT of stupid mistakes and felt a LOT more comfortable initially learning. After a year I'd say that I'm a competent rider, but I may have gotten there quicker if I had riden my 250 before the 750.

Moral of the story; starting on a big bike doesn't mean you are going to drop it or ride to your death. Having said that, after a year of riding I STILL rarely touch the true powerband of this bike (6/7k plus) and see what it can really do.

Edit: I also don't regret buying *either* bike. The 750 is a LOT of fun, but so was the 250 after I got it running. I don't plan on selling either of them.
 

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I read a post about this a while back. One of the big things that really sticks was this:

Learn how to RIDE, not learn how to ride the BIKE.

The emphasis being that learning how to ride properly is the most important thing to learn. It (almost) doesn't matter what bike you are on. Your individual skills transfer from bike to bike, but if you never develop them to being with....
 

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Whats up everyone! I just joined the site yesturday and got to reading. I wanted to say that i also highly recommend the MSF course. I had never operated a bike before, only been a passenger, and i passed and got my license. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to ride. Its basics, but it was a challenge for me! Mine was $250 and it was a 2 day course 8am-5pm. Definatly worth checkin out.
 

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ratherberiding
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Discussion Starter #50
Whats up everyone! I just joined the site yesturday and got to reading. I wanted to say that i also highly recommend the MSF course. I had never operated a bike before, only been a passenger, and i passed and got my license. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to ride. Its basics, but it was a challenge for me! Mine was $250 and it was a 2 day course 8am-5pm. Definatly worth checkin out.
:welcome:
 

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In the States is there anywhere that you NEED to complete some courses before taking the test at the DMV?

The way it seems (after reading these posts) is that the MSF course is optional which IMO is dumb. It should be manditory. I learned so much at my riding school(equivalent to the MSF + a little more). I'll never regret spending the 500$ for 22 hours of riding and 120$ for a 2 hour Private lesson with an instructor.

I suggest you listen to most people here and go do the course before attempting to learn yourself.
 

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In the States is there anywhere that you NEED to complete some courses before taking the test at the DMV?

The way it seems (after reading these posts) is that the MSF course is optional which IMO is dumb. It should be manditory. I learned so much at my riding school(equivalent to the MSF + a little more). I'll never regret spending the 500$ for 22 hours of riding and 120$ for a 2 hour Private lesson with an instructor.

I suggest you listen to most people here and go do the course before attempting to learn yourself.

I agree it should be mandatory, but any beginner is going to go through it because I don't think they would pass the DMV test. On the other hand, all those experienced will learn something new. If you have been riding for let say 10 years the wrong way, then that's 1 year experience repeated 10 times.

Its good to hear you got the proper training and started of on a good choice of bike.

As for me, I continue to learn from anywhere I can. Thinking about taking the advance MSF course on my own bike. :)
 

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I'm pretty sure it isn't mandatory, at least in NY and a few other states. I passed my DMV test within 3 weeks of sporadic riding, but still continued to practice the turns, stops, etc. It does seem that most prefer to take it anyway, which I want to do next year, not only for the advice but also for the insurance drop.
 

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No prob. Just keep it slow and smooth till you progress. Read as much as you can on here

And as many times as I've read this here and elsewhere, so many people are just plain retarded, and don't adhere to this. Like my moron friend who continues to have stupid crashes that could probably be avoided. Good reminder for those of us who can think though.
 

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Yes and no for CA. If you're under 21 it's mandatory, so they give you a $100 discount. If you're over 21 they stick you the whole $250.

Worth it though, since they teach you a lot of slow speed manuevers and control, which IMO is the hardest part of physically riding.

Originally Posted by 250Rocket
In the States is there anywhere that you NEED to complete some courses before taking the test at the DMV?
 

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hey everyone, im a new to all of this. never been on a bike before and well im very interested in learning. my brothers been riding fo r quite a few yrs aswell as my dad, and my boyfriend just got into riding. well i got a 09 ninja 250r, and plan on taking the rider safety course they have here in nh. is there anything i should know or any good advice anyone can give.
 

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hey everyone, im a new to all of this. never been on a bike before and well im very interested in learning. my brothers been riding fo r quite a few yrs aswell as my dad, and my boyfriend just got into riding. well i got a 09 ninja 250r, and plan on taking the rider safety course they have here in nh. is there anything i should know or any good advice anyone can give.
Welcome!! I will tell ya that i was the same way. I had been a passenger on a bike, but never operated one. I signed up and took the MSF course last October. I definatly recommend it!! Its a great learning experience especially if you have never been on a bike. They teach you the basics and walk you through step by step. After i took the course, i got a 08 zx6r. It made me more confident to ride after i took the class, thats for sure. If you pass the MSF course, all you have to do is go and take your permit and you are licensed! Do you have your permit yet??
 

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no i dont have my permit yet, but u dont need one to take the class. my boyfriend took it last yr in the beginning, he said all he had to do was watch videos first day second day u on the course, and third day u on the course and take there little test, they give u a card and u can go to the dmv and get the endorsement on ur license. my class starts in april.. but im hoping to get a lil practice in before then.
 
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