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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need help from experience ride:

If you are on local street, you turn in too fast and you are in the turn already, what should you do?

If you cut the throttle in the turn, the bike would drop?
If you keep turning, side of your tires slide on the curb, what would happen?
If you keep your throttle and press harder, would you be able to make a sharper turn?

:confused:
 

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You could bring it back up straight and then brake if need be.

Don't brake in the turn or your do a highside/lowside depending on which brake you use.

Did you take an MSF course before starting to ride?
 

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The bike's suspension is stable when there is slightly more weight on the rear tire than the front, it should be about 60/40 distribution. At a standstill the bike is pretty much 50/50. That means to settle the bike you have to be on the throttle, a smooth roll on.

You also have more traction in the rear because of this. If you are going a steady speed and leaned over, you have less traction in the front. To make it even, again you must accelerate smoothly.

Accelerating puts your suspension and traction in the correct range. You'll drag parts before you lose traction if your tires are warm and there's no sand, oil etc. So if you don't think you can make it, practice more. Set up a track day, practice on a relatively safe corner and just get comfortable with the bike leaned over.

EDIT: The real advice is to not be there in the first place, but I've been there a few times too many. The first reaction I have is to go "FUCK" BRAKE but I know my bike can make it. If you do brake, as the post above says, make sure you are completely straight. Do whatever it takes to be completely comfortable with your bike.
 

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I gotta say, this is my main issue as well. I took the MSF course, but they only really taught me what I should do on a turn at 15km/h. I guess its better to take things slow while you're starting out, and slow speed things up and you;d get a feel for it.
 

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I gotta say, this is my main issue as well. I took the MSF course, but they only really taught me what I should do on a turn at 15km/h. I guess its better to take things slow while you're starting out, and slow speed things up and you;d get a feel for it.
It's the same thing as long as you're fast enough to counter steer. Just look through the turn, trust your tires, stay accelerating and you'll make it. The main thing is practice before you find yourself in a situation like that.

one more thing. WHY THE FUCK IS THIS IN THE FREAKING 250 SECTION. AAHH. This should be in two wheel discussion, as it's not specific to the 250 model.
 

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Lean in more. I went into this one turn and almost didnt make it thru i had the worst line through the turn. Then the next time I tried it I leaned in more like in actually getting my ass off the seat and leaning a bit more off it. It worked perfectly.
 

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Lean in more. I went into this one turn and almost didnt make it thru i had the worst line through the turn. Then the next time I tried it I leaned in more like in actually getting my ass off the seat and leaning a bit more off it. It worked perfectly.
A common mistake is to think that getting your butt off makes a huge difference. Most people who focus on getting their butt off end up crossed up with the bike, with their upper body negating any positive effects of your lower body hanging off. Focus more on your upper body. When you run through corners (like doorways) you lead with your upper body. The majority of the weight is there. Have your head, shoulders, and hips aligned in a straight line. Focus on kissing your mirrors, and looking through the turn. Your body should be parallel to the bike. Body positioning is second to learning how throttle makes your suspension and traction compliant though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bignastyjb, yup, I did take the BRC, but they could only do so much. I am not a natural born rider so I make a lot mistakes. Need to know what to do to prepare for them.

shadows090, very detailed explaination. Thanks and sorry about the mispost. I will be more careful next time.

murc585, very hard to avoid mistake for people like me, stupid yet what to learn everything.

iflabs & ninja250n00b, thanks.
 

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I am not a natural born rider so I make a lot mistakes. Need to know what to do to prepare for them.

shadows090, very detailed explaination. Thanks and sorry about the mispost. I will be more careful next time.
Everyone makes mistakes and you're doing the right thing by asking. Nobody knows these things until they learn them. I've been in that situation more times than I should have, just keep safety continuously in your mind.

Ride safe.
 

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The bike's suspension is stable when there is slightly more weight on the rear tire than the front, it should be about 60/40 distribution. At a standstill the bike is pretty much 50/50. That means to settle the bike you have to be on the throttle, a smooth roll on.

You also have more traction in the rear because of this. If you are going a steady speed and leaned over, you have less traction in the front. To make it even, again you must accelerate smoothly.

Accelerating puts your suspension and traction in the correct range. You'll drag parts before you lose traction if your tires are warm and there's no sand, oil etc. So if you don't think you can make it, practice more. Set up a track day, practice on a relatively safe corner and just get comfortable with the bike leaned over.

EDIT: The real advice is to not be there in the first place, but I've been there a few times too many. The first reaction I have is to go "FUCK" BRAKE but I know my bike can make it. If you do brake, as the post above says, make sure you are completely straight. Do whatever it takes to be completely comfortable with your bike.
:plusone: to everything. All the tech knowledge is spot on.

And especially about the bit about not being there in the first place. You're on a public road, there's absolutely no excuse for entering a turn physically too hot for a modern supersport bike (or yourself for that matter) to handle. If you think you can't hack the turn you just threw yourself into, YOU fucked up, and 99% of the time it'd be intentional. You MEANT to hit that turn that fast, and it ended up being too fast. There's NEVER a circumstance where you're riding sanely and well within your abilities where you'll think "Shit, I hit this turn too hot." Things can jump out at you, or you can see debris in the road, whatever...but if your problem is that you're going to fast, then slow down. Period. And if you just don't know the road...well that's even MORE ridiculous. lol

EDIT

And before someone pulls the holier-than-thou card and says, "like you've never done it before"...OF COURSE I've done it before. And actually learned from the experience. That's how I know what I'm talking about. lol
 

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1. Reduce speed before the turn by closing the throttle and, if necessary, applying both brakes.

2. Push on the left handgrip and lean to the left to turn left, and push on the right handgrip and lean right to go right.

3. Roll on the throttle through the turn, keeping a steady speed or accelerating gently. Avoid slowing down in the midst of a turn.

4. Keep in mind that during routine turns, you and your motorcycle must lean at the same angle. During slow, sharp turns, lean the motorcycle only and keep your body straight.

5. Lean more than you normally would if you're approaching the turn at a high speed and/or the turn is tight. In general, though, it's best to limit your speed and avoid taking turns too fast.

Approach turns very carefully until you learn how fast you can actually take them. You can always speed up when coming out of the turn.

Look through the turn to where you want to go. Turn just your head, not your shoulders, and keep your eyes level with the horizon.

Use your best judgment and ride within your abilities. Your not on the track so you should not be leaning as much anyway.
 

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I have about 1k mile experience on my 250r and should I be concerned about learning to downshift before a corner?

There's quite a bit of entering and exiting a highway onramp during my commute and my cornering technique pretty much just involves:

1. slowing decreasing throttle(6th gear)
2. disengage clutch and apply both brakes
3. reapply throttle moments before the corner and gradually apply more throttle during the turn.

I'm quite comfortable with this but I've been reading about downshifting and I don't think I can quite apply it on my 250r since I'm already at such a high RPM on 6th gear before entering a turn.
 

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I have about 1k mile experience on my 250r and should I be concerned about learning to downshift before a corner?

There's quite a bit of entering and exiting a highway onramp during my commute and my cornering technique pretty much just involves:

1. slowing decreasing throttle(6th gear)
2. disengage clutch and apply both brakes
3. reapply throttle moments before the corner and gradually apply more throttle during the turn.

I'm quite comfortable with this but I've been reading about downshifting and I don't think I can quite apply it on my 250r since I'm already at such a high RPM on 6th gear before entering a turn.
You don't have to downshift before a turn, the point is that you don't want to downshift IN a turn, and most supersport/superbike MC's you want to hit a lower gear to get more power exiting a corner. It's only a necessity to get a good drive out of the corner in a racing situation.

Also...don't pull in the clutch unless you're going to change gears. There's no need, and it only opens you up for the opportunity to have a sloppy re-engagement that can upset things.
 

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I engine brake to slow down a little, but I never use my brakes while engine braking (with the clutch engaged). I always disengage the clutch if I'm really braking. I guess it's just muscle memory to pull in both levers.

If I'm riding really spirited I don't engine brake. Hard on the gas, hard on the brakes while I set up body position, then smooth roll on through turns while my bike settles itself.

Damn, that's making me want to go for a ride :-D.
 

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Question for Skywalker (or anyone else) -

I am a new rider as well and have made the mistake listed in this forum. Graduated from MSC in Aug and agree with others that the real learning begins after you get your license.

I have read Proficent Motorcycling and practice weekly in a parking lot. I say that to say this....are you saying in your earlier post that is best to up shift at the end of the turn? I am confused. I have learned myself with the small gear range of the Ninja 250 to have downshifted before the turn in order to have plenty of power when going into the turn. I am speaking of 90 degree turns through a neighborhood, not on-off ramps on the highway.

To all - thanks for your comments in this forum. It all helps us rookies.
 

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Turn in too fast (turn too sharp), widen the turn out.

Take a corner too hot (fast), lean like you've never leaned before.

Dunno about anyone else but I couldn't read through all the posts after seeing all the technical crap pulled out of the "What an elite sportbiker must know to sound experienced so buy my book or else you can never be an experienced rider" book. Doesn't anyone learn by doing anymore or are we in an extended japan where real life experience is an equation you solve in a textbook.
 

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Question for Skywalker (or anyone else) -

I am a new rider as well and have made the mistake listed in this forum. Graduated from MSC in Aug and agree with others that the real learning begins after you get your license.

I have read Proficent Motorcycling and practice weekly in a parking lot. I say that to say this....are you saying in your earlier post that is best to up shift at the end of the turn? I am confused. I have learned myself with the small gear range of the Ninja 250 to have downshifted before the turn in order to have plenty of power when going into the turn. I am speaking of 90 degree turns through a neighborhood, not on-off ramps on the highway.

To all - thanks for your comments in this forum. It all helps us rookies.

4. Keep in mind that during routine turns, you and your motorcycle must lean at the same angle. During slow, sharp turns, lean the motorcycle only and keep your body straight. Slow tight turns, such as U-Turns make sure you use the counterweight technique.

And again turn your head and look where you want to go and keep your eyes level with the horizon.
 

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I have read Proficent Motorcycling and practice weekly in a parking lot. I say that to say this....are you saying in your earlier post that is best to up shift at the end of the turn? I am confused. I have learned myself with the small gear range of the Ninja 250 to have downshifted before the turn in order to have plenty of power when going into the turn. I am speaking of 90 degree turns through a neighborhood, not on-off ramps on the highway.

To all - thanks for your comments in this forum. It all helps us rookies.
The gear range of the Ninja 250 is not that narrow for "neighborhood" riding that you need to worry about it unless your neighborhood happens to be I-nnn.

The whole key to the turns is to have done all your roll-off and braking before you even initiate the lean. Once leaned your should be rolling on the throttle all the way through the turn until you are upright again. Brake, roll off, change your lean angle, and you will go wide.

How fast and what gear? You've got torque from ~5K on up on the 250 so any entry speed that is >5k get's the job done. Just remember as you lean the bike in and stand the bike back up your rpms will change because you are changing the contact patch (lean in rpms up, stand up rpms down).

But again, in the "neighborhood" this shouldn't make a bit a difference at the "appropriate speeds" you will be going.
 
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