Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

21 - 28 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,118 Posts
Registering:

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/vr/checklists/outofstate.htm

There are no emissions checks on MCs in CA.

Lane splitting - CHP says

Can motorcycle riders "split" lanes and ride between other vehicles?
Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible but must be done in a safe and prudent manner.


Safe and prudent as defined by the individual officer. As long as you don't ride like an asshat doing wheelies and going wicked fast most cops will leave you alone. Back when there was a "speed limit" on splitting it was no more than 10 - 15 MPH faster than the cars, not 5.

Get used to driving in CA traffic before you start splitting. Start light with filtering at lights and move up from there. Keep your levers covered. Rinse and repeat.
Thanks for the clarification!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
I have a few more questions. In most states it is legal to complete your turn if the light turns red while you are already past the stop line. Three people in San Diego have made comments that seem to imply that this isn't the case here. My sister said that she's not sure but she thinks that it's not allowed. A friend of hers was feeaking out about a stoplight camera even though he was just following slowly through when the light changed. He, too, said that he was unsure of the actual law.

Another concern is parking at curbs. My sister told me years ago that all vehicles are required to turn their wheel against the curb when parking. I am used to parking in a space for maximum visibility so that a vehicle does not think it is empty and run over my bike when entering hastily. Does the law apply to motorcycles too? It seems like it could make the bike fall over depending on the circumstances! For example, you may not be able to lock the bars left and the lean angle will change in an already-hilly environment.

Oh! I already made the mistake of ordering In-N-Out Burger's plain fries ("fresh" or not, why have the carbs if they taste like dry paper and don't come cheaper with a combo?). To be safe, I figured I'd ask this time: What should a guy order who has never eaten at "Jack In The Box" before? ;)

On the note of lane-splitting don't do what makes you feel uncomfortable. But your not suppose to travel more than 5mph faster than the vehicles your "splitting"

If you need to get used to riding in tight spaces, pratice riding on the sidewalk and start off "splitting" at stoplights to get to the front of traffic. Then during heavy stop&go traffic - your less ;ikel;y to have a serious injury in these circumstances. Splitting lanes can become addictive so just cautious. (You seem to have your head on straight)

Go ahead and do the mobile detail if your not gonna clean the bike yourself. (Don't worry about the cracked fairing, get that grime off) Take your bike in to transfer the registration over, you should be exempt because it's a newer vehicle, but if anything I almost guarentee you'll pass emissions if required to go. If you really need you can register your bike here in AZ or keep the registration in GA and just make sure to update your license.

- Cheers
Thanks. Will I have to take the road test again or will they recognize my GA certs (passed the MSF BRC/H-D Rider's Edge and got licensed just this past Summer)?

Stop-lights in particular seemed like the one kind of place where lanesplitting might not be allowed but I just finished some research and I see that it is. Nice, but I'll use that sparingly. :)

Registering:

http://www.dmv.ca.gov/vr/checklists/outofstate.htm

There are no emissions checks on MCs in CA.

Lane splitting - CHP says

Can motorcycle riders "split" lanes and ride between other vehicles?
Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible but must be done in a safe and prudent manner.


Safe and prudent as defined by the individual officer. As long as you don't ride like an asshat doing wheelies and going wicked fast most cops will leave you alone. Back when there was a "speed limit" on splitting it was no more than 10 - 15 MPH faster than the cars, not 5.

Get used to driving in CA traffic before you start splitting. Start light with filtering at lights and move up from there. Keep your levers covered. Rinse and repeat.
Thanks. I read some things about people getting tickets for splitting the HOV with lane #1 (not covered in their explanation), so I still have a lot of research to do. Can motorcycles enter ALL HOVs, even the ones that are only open during peak hours or charge a fee? They were talking about changing Atlanta's HOVs to toll lanes and never said how it would affect motorcycles that can currently use them freely (many will still need it with their air-cooled engines).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,118 Posts
In every state Motorcycles are Federally permitted to travel in the HOV lane,
even with a single occupant/rider.

Your license should be accepted especially since it was just issued. I advise heading down there and updating your address and picking up a motorcycle safety pamphlet. (Will have some Cali specific laws that may help)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
Bike + HOV, no worries, you can use any of them at any time. Not sure about the toll roads, we only have one that I know of in San Diego and I don't usually ride on it 'cause I don't live near it.

Splitting lanes? If you have never done it before, take it slow and get used to it, especially in heavy traffic on the freeways. You can split lanes at stop lights no problem. I live on Coronado but I don't split lanes there, speed limit is 25 on the Island so I don't see the point. Rule of thumb is 15mph over what the rest of traffic is doing up to about 45mph. When you get used to it, you will find yourself splitting at faster speeds. Just be sure to scan ahead and watch the car bumpers. They will be the first thing to move if someone is going to change lanes in front of you. I usually scan ahead about 4 cars or more depending on my speed. Don't fret over passing a cop car when splitting in traffic, they can't do shit. It's the bike cops you want to watch for and play it cool around. Don't pass a bike cop if he isn't splitting. If he is off the bike tho, just go by at a reasonable speed and you should be fine.

Parking, standard fare, only need to turn your wheels if you are parked on an incline, nothing special otherwise. Parking your bike, I usually back into the curb with the rear wheel or I will park on the sidewalk if its a large parking lot. Just depends on the situation. I've never gotten flack about it from anyone/anywhere.

Completing a turn after you are past the stop line - Use caution if you do this, try to avoid it. Many intersections have cameras in them and will nail you for that. Cops will ticket you for that too. Right turn on red is legal unless posted otherwise so keep your eyes open for the signs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
I have a few more questions. In most states it is legal to complete your turn if the light turns red while you are already past the stop line. Three people in San Diego have made comments that seem to imply that this isn't the case here. My sister said that she's not sure but she thinks that it's not allowed. A friend of hers was feeaking out about a stoplight camera even though he was just following slowly through when the light changed. He, too, said that he was unsure of the actual law.

Another concern is parking at curbs...
...Completing a turn after you are past the stop line - Use caution if you do this, try to avoid it. Many intersections have cameras in them and will nail you for that. Cops will ticket you for that too. Right turn on red is legal unless posted otherwise so keep your eyes open for the signs.
Well, I continued researching it and read that "Waiting behind line for left turn is wrong" and "Once in an intersection [past the stop line], when the signal changes to amber or red, a vehicle is permitted (required) to clear the intersection."

Anyway, I saw a camera flash in my face today after clearing the intersection in my sisters car. I looked it up and it appears that they sometimes also take a picture of your vehicle when it turns yellow so that they can show that you had time to stop and not enter the intersection before it turns red. Part of the reason for the reason for a yellow light is to give you a chance to see it after it changes and before the light changes red, so they have to understand that you may have been glancing at the intersection or the street you are turning onto when it changed and you may not realize how long it has been yellow.

Anyway, I was amazed that I still had a green arrow as I crossed three lanes of traffic to enter the turn lane for a U-turn. Regardless, I was expecting it to turn yellow at any moment, so I was slowing as if to stop. Unexpectedly, it remained green as I neared the light, so I had to look beside me into the oncoming lane to see if there were pedestrian or vehicles to look out for when making my slow U-turn (IIRC, there may have been one making a right-turn on red). When I looked forward again, my light had finally turned yellow but I was already entering the intersection. Having already entered the intersection, I completed my somewhat slow turn without hurrying up. That's when I saw the flash coming from a box on my right side. Though I began my turn legally, I think that by moving slowly I exhausted the 0.3-0.5 second "grace period" that these machines typically have.

A day or two earlier, I told my sister that I saw cameras flashing at night on Mira Mesa Blvd even though I saw no one running lights and I didn't see any "camera enforced" signs at the stop lights. She told me that there must always be a sign saying so by CA law, but there was no camera enforcement sign at the intersection today, at least not on my originating street (U-turn on Mira Mesa Blvd from East to West at Black Mountain Rd). ~2:40-3:05PM (give ot take 5mins).

All I can say is that I tried to find out all relative concerns in advance and I drove as safely and correctly as possible, so it should not ticket me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Ride report part 1:

Wasn't bad until the last day really (really bad luck that day). Each day had it's problems of course. I knew that I needed to take the most southerly route I could because all the news stations were talking about the freak midwestern snowstorms in late December. Rather than taking I-20 most of the way, I took I-85 out of Atlanta into Alabama, skipped over to I-10 via I-65, and took that through Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and into Arizona where I got on I-8 for the final leg into San Diego, CA where I now live off of I-15. Yeah, even if I tried my best to side-step it, I almost froze my balls off and my face and neck were flaking with chapped skin for weeks. The days were really short because it is winter-time, so I didn't get to see nearly as much scenery as I'd hoped. I was loaded down with my tank bag, backpack, a hydration bladder, etc and the only "winter gear" I had was some silk liners to put in my VENTILATED Tour Master gloves. As numb and painful as they were, I'm surprised my fingers all made it through. Additionally, I had some waterproof Joe Rocket boots, a Tour Master mesh jacket with the thermal and outer liner, jeans with Joe Rocket mesh riding pants (no thermals or long-johns underneath), and t-shirts.

On day 1, I lost a couple precious daylight hours when my SK4000 headset fell into my fairings when I was trying to charge it under my seat at a Louisiana gas station. It would've only taken a few minutes to get to it if I had my multi-driver from home. Damn cheap OEM tool kit... I needed to rig up a "right-angle screwdriver" to actually turn the bolts with that crappy screwdriver and it still chewed them up. I think the allen wrench I used was one I threw in there myself, so I'm lucky I had it. Earlier in AL I ran out of gas with only 117mi on the trip meter and about a quarter of a tank still on the gauge. A Good Samaritan had some gas and refused to take any cash for it. Thanks, whoever you are! Anyway, I've gone well below that point on the gauge many times since and often ventured into the last eighth of a tank, so that was bizarre for it to run out and still register 1/4 a tank. I knew from reading here to not rely on the gauge and to use the trip meter, which typically reads in the 186-192mi range when I pull in to fuel up (sometimes fitting ~4.3ga). Now I learned not to trust the trip meter either when driving on the interstate. :D Even on the interstates, all my other tanks got much more distance and I haven't seen it do that poorly since (at least 145mi before I near that point). I had hoped to make it to Texas but I didn't make good time. I stayed at a Lake Charles, LA Motel 6 where I snuck my bike inside the room. I sure didn't want it getting stolen and stranding me! Baton Rouge sure smelled good on a Saturday night!

Day 2 took me through Houston and San Antonio but was pretty uneventful during the day. I couldn't see the refineries all around me the night before so I didn't realize how close to Texas I was. I drove through a good chunk of TX on I-10. I wasted a lot of time at a glorified gas station and jerky stand called "Buc-ee's," (signage for a hundred miles made it seem like a theme park!). There, it got dark and I put on my jacket's liners before hitting the road again and punching right through San Antonio. I nearly ran out of gas (AGAIN!) later that night too... after watching the exits grow fewer and farther between with no gas signs for the last half a tank, I eventually just had to exit and hyper-mile 12mi the wrong way to the closest town on the last eighth of a tank in freezing weather. When I got there my gauge was well past the mark where I ran out the day earlier. I thought I was going to be stranded in the freezing cold in the middle of nowhere (I think I saw one car pass in an hour), so it was a HUGE relief. The locals expressed extreme surprise that I was riding in that weather. I got some hot chocolate and warmed up, but I didn't make it far before the freezing cold caught up to me and I just wanted to sleep. Some crappy budget motel wanted to charge me freakin' $80+ for an unsold room and pretended that it was a discount. After unlocking my helmet I set it on the handlebars and went back in to see how far I could haggle only to get turned down (the guy must have thought I was desperate). I forgot the my helmet was hanging on the bars and ended up making it fall to the ground and roll. There are scuffs and scratches but I think it fell on my Parrot headset (still works) so the impact absorption of my helmet should still be OK. I was even more pissed after that but I went on a little farther to Junction, TX and found a cheaper Motel 6 ($40-$60 IIRC). Screw that guy, it's not like he was going to rent the rest of his rooms that late (~midnight IIRC). When I stepped out to watch and see when it was safe to sneak my bike into the room, the night manager approached me and told me that I could put it on the sidewalk right next to the window. Maybe he knew what I was up to, but I was actually considering locking it to another bike that was outside and sharing my second key with that guy (he was outside too; yeah, I guess I wasn't the only crazy rider around ;)). I took him up on his offer and set my netbook (Acer Aspire One) on the table inside looking directly at, visibly recording the activity outside so no one would touch it.

Day 3 was another day spent entirely on I-10 and in TX, which had some awesome scenery including wildlife (javelinas and such), a couple tumbleweeds, expansive desert plains, and massive wind farms. The motel's outdoor fountain was a frozen-solid cascade of icicles, so I waited for it to warm up a little and started late but I made good time and, before long, the temps weren't bad. I did slip and fall while lubing my chain at a Sonora, TX gas station that morning, but I was in full gear and it wasn't a problem (landed on my backpack). I realized that the foam piece over the mic on my Parrot SK4000 headset was gone, so no more talking while riding for me. I also got ripped off at a Chevron gas station in the middle of the wilderness... they were charging almost a dollar more per gallon than anywhere else in the state that day. They said that it was "because of their location," where an off ramp leads straight up a tall geological structure of some kind where there is nothing else but the tiny shack of a gas station with no potable water. Fine, I could understand that I guess, but then I had to get back on I-10 and found that the on-ramp runs parallel to the Interstate for a bit and sends you RIGHT PAST ANOTHER CHEVRON STATION. This is clearly by design: If you got turned off by the price at the first, you'd get it anyway at the second. They win. El Paso/Chihuahua was an amazing scene at night. I stopped to grab a bite to eat then drove on to Deming, NM for the night. Somewhere in between I had a flashback to the other gas station when I saw an official sign (not an advertisement) about it being the last exit with food and gas for some miles. The place appeared to be closed before 8PM except that the pumps were still on for credit purchases. They were charging over $0.50 more per gallon than the earlier gas stations. There was a sign offering a "free" hot dog with any gas purchase but, even if the store part of the station were open, THAT AIN'T FREE! I could've bought three hotdogs at a typical gas station with the extra money in my little tank, but I sure as hell wasn't driving back toward El Paso. Screw it, they win too. I stayed at a Holiday Inn (Motel 6 was full; it was nearly Christmas) in Deming, where I asked them if I could hide the bike behind an outdoor stairwell with plenty of room underneath. They said "no" (fire code?) and offered to watch it themselves right in front of the lobby. I looped the cable around a solid pole and through my tire and covered it for the night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Ride report part 2: Day 4

Though I looked forward to the scenery of NM and AZ, the final day was HELL. Everything was wet when I got to Tuscon, AZ but things cleared long before I got to Yuma, AZ (HI BIKERCHICK!) and entered CA.

The HELL started when I woke up to INSANE wind. Stepping outside meant getting pelted all over with stinging sand. Luckily, I wore glasses (really, I needed goggles!) so I was able to get the cover off my bike and the lock disconnected without going blind, but the cover would catch the wind and almost pick up my 250lb ass! Anyway, I felt really stupid getting on and riding in that wind, but the people assured me that it was like that every day (vast NM plains with no trees to break the wind). I was tempted to wait until night (it certainly wasn't like that when I arrived) but I had to go. Apparently, I was driving AGAINST the wind because I couldn't muster over 60mph without drafting a large vehicle (RV, tractor-trailer, tanker, etc). The wind seemed a lot more chaotic and turbulent behind them but the speed boost was obvious. In some areas I couldn't even do over 51mph without drafting! I was able to do 100mph (indicated; moar liek 90mph lol mirite?) in Texas the day before and all of a sudden I could barely muster half that. It was like that until I hit the mountains where I still couldn't muster any better. Yeah, going down mountains was alright, but the wind and mountains combined to make me feel like I was on a scooter for the first time in nearly 6,000mi of riding my '08 EX250 and it was like that nearly all day. Drafting gave me a poor view and I'm pretty sure that I felt a couple small tumbleweeds hit behind my front tire (couldn't see them coming).

But that isn't what really ruined the day. When I first stopped for gas in NM, I saw some beautiful mountains tearing apart some dark clouds far off ahead. I had to have a picture, so I pulled over before getting back on I-10, unzipped my jacket, pulled out my iPhone 3G, and got a few pictures. I quickly threw it into my jacket's outside pocket and continued on. Those clouds did not want me having a picture of them. :( As I entered the mountains in AZ, there was a little misting precipitation coming from the clouds, but there was always sunlight visible ahead from the peaks and I was still dry, so I resolved to push forward and try to beat the coming rain. If I couldn't, I would pull over and put my phone in a Zip-loq bag. It sounded like a plan, but remember: I had to draft tractor-trailers to get through these mountains, so they had 18-wheels throwing up more mist from the road. At some points I couldn't even see through my visor! Thinking that my phone was still inside my jacket, I did not zip up my outer pocket and the turbulence behind these vehicles was just right to wrap the mist right into it... all the while my jeans remained completely dry except for a little mist that would collect and run down the tank into my inner-thigh area. I wasn't concerned about the phone with such light misting if I wasn't even getting wet and it was in my pocket, so I thought my headset was acting up when the music streaming from my A2DP adapter shut off. Rather than stopping to diagnose it and letting the rain catch up, I continued on, oblivious to the "iPhone Stew" in my pocket. I finally needed gas in Benson, AZ, and I've already told everyone what happened there (DAMNED CATTLE-GUARDS ARE DEADLY!). This is where I discovered my ruined iPhone. After having ANOTHER motorcycle vs. cattle-guard incident when leaving, I rode on to Tuscon where another crazy biker told me how to get to an AT&T store. From there I found out that I had to go to an Apple Store. Before going, I called from one of AT&T's phones to ask about non-warranty advance replacement service ("$200" but I had to go there). I asked for directions, he came back and retracted that saying "sorry, it's $600;" there is no out of warranty repair/replacement option, refurbs are for new contracts, and I have to buy a completely new phone out-of-contract.

APPLE RANT: I'd be switching to an Android phone with A2DP and REAL GPS before I'd ever consider that. These things aren't disposable. If I could have removed the battery, the phone may have been OK. Why is it the only phone without a removable battery and the only one which you cannot purchase insurance from AT&T? Oh yeah! Because they want you to buy a new one like it's a disposable gadget... just like their iPods with sealed batteries, missing features, and zero expandability. Every other music phone has expandable storage, A2DP/AVRCP, subscription music, removable batteries, insurance option, and more. Until the phone launched several months earlier, I had been paying for 3+ years of AT&T/Cingular service + phone insurance only to have that safety net pulled out from under me right when I needed it. No doubt, it was also a ploy to sell Apple Care extended warranties (Apple doesn't get a cut from provider insurance beyond profitting from the replacement), but that wouldn't have helped with water damage and you wouldn't get to keep the phone for parts like you could with insurance. It froze and crashed as much as or more than any phone I ever owned and often had responsiveness issues (though that is what it is primarily praised for). Their shitty crash-prone mobile Safari web browser was an embarrassment. Does Steve Jobs tolerate a browser that just crashed while he's scrolling around? My first iPhone 3G was defective out of the box and my brother's had the same issues, so they were Oh-for-Three as far as those issues go (not a lemon). It was even a shitty music player that couldn't do something as basic as SCROLL THE FREAKING TRACK INFORMATION (ironically, the mini-player shows more than the full-screen one), so SCREW APPLE AND SCREW ALL THE MAC ZEALOTS WHO TURN A BLIND EYE TO THEIR SHORTCOMINGS.

Anyway, the phone is ruined and it took all my pictures and mileage statistics with it. Before leaving AT&T/Tuscon, I left message explaining the situation to my brother and told him to tell my sister (her number was lost with my phone). Without my phone I no longer had the exact address of my and my sister's new home, no directions, no phone number, and no direct way to reach my sister in San Diego. I passed under Phoenix getting on I-8 and left AZ through Yuma into California crossing a few active border patrol stations to get to San Diego. *Whew* When I arrived, I tried three defective pay phones and could only hear the street name and interstate number after relaying through my brother in GA and running out of minutes/quarters. I found the street and checked all the parking lots for my sister's car, but I couldn't be sure that I recognized it from years earlier and I still didn't know the actual condo's number, so all I could do was ride around looking for my sister herself (turns out she was asleep) and hope she was expecting me. I tried to relay that I was in San Diego when I called earlier but she couldn't hear me over the defective phone and wasn't waiting for me. I didn't know what she did or didn't hear. When I finally decided to leave and attempt to contact her again, I got stuck at a "smart" light that would not change for motorcycles and some asshole on a cellphone across the road refused to push the crossing button for me (he was standing right next to it). I dunno, maybe he didn't speak English, but he could at least acknowledge me attempting to talk to him. I had to get off the bike and walk to the side then RUN back to get through. A tow truck driver let me use his phone that actually WORKED so I called my brother in GA and FINALLY got the info I needed. I called my sister and confirmed that it was her car I spotted and she would meet me outside. Though I had arrived on Dec 23, it was now Christmas Eve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
holy cow. I thought my trip to PA from georgia was rough. That wind chill doesn't play around.

hilarious, you snuck your bike into the room. I am so gonna do that next road trip. Peace of mind and all.

Cool, glad you made it, what was the total mileage travelled?
 
21 - 28 of 28 Posts
Top