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I hear you Newbie but this isn't about what you start on as much as it's about having a realistic grasp on your abilities...or lack thereof. It’s been my experience that people who scoff at good advice and call the source of such good advice an “idiot” usually are the same people who have a warped sense of their own talent and as such they often, by virtue of thinking they are above crashing, do indeed crash and often times hurt others in the process.

This is something about which we all should care. ;)
I totally agree with you PRS and I recommend everything you've said on this thread, but arguing with them on a forum won't change who they are nor what they think.

We should learn to let them be.

:D

For example some newb was asking for help fixing his bike on another thread and another member of this forum said and I'm paraphrasing here: "I won't help you fix it because that's not the right bike to learn on"!!!

WHAT??? Come on!!!

This is a pet peeve of mine and I'm not suggesting you do this, but it just pisses me off to see a newb join our forum and he already has or already bought a bigger bike and people start saying stuff like "you should sell that bike and buy a smaller one" or "you bought the wrong bike" or "I can't wait to see what parts he'll sell next week" or anything like that. This attitude just turns newbs away and we've lost an opportunity to show them how to learn on THEIR bike, regardless what bike they have.

What we should do, is give the newb recommendations of how to learn on HIS bike, regardless if we agree or not with his choice of bikes!!

I'm just saying

;)
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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I totally agree with you PRS and I recommend everything you've said on this thread, but arguing with them on a forum won't change who they are nor what they think.

We should learn to let them be.

:D
I think the point that is trying to be made is that we can change others.

If we let such incorrect, uneducated, and dangerous viewpoints exist without refuting them, some other newbie might get the wrong idea.
By fighting back, it sends a message to readers that someone thinks this is wrong, someone more experienced.
Will everyone listen to the voice of reason? No.

Will some listen to the voice of reason? We can only hope.
 

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Get off of my lawn Dammit
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42,767 Posts
I totally agree with you PRS and I recommend everything you've said on this thread, but arguing with them on a forum won't change who they are nor what they think.

We should learn to let them be.

:D

You do realize the next time I see you trading shots with GTS and/or Kurosaki, I'm going to throw these words at you, right? :Laughing rolling:
 

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Premium Member
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15,937 Posts
I think the point that is trying to be made is that we can change others.

If we let such incorrect, uneducated, and dangerous viewpoints exist without refuting them, some other newbie might get the wrong idea.
By fighting back, it sends a message to readers that someone thinks this is wrong, someone more experienced.
Will everyone listen to the voice of reason? No.

Will some listen to the voice of reason? We can only hope.
True we can only hope.

But I doubt it specially on a forum on the internets!

:)
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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DAMN YOOOOOUUUUUU PRS!!!!

:Laughing rolling:

Touche!
haha you just screwed yourself newbie:Laughing rolling::Laughing rolling::Laughing rolling:
 

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Pursebully
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good point...everyone does copy/paste but jeff seems to be the only one catching hell for it.
i'm a little tired of some of you smug fuckers beating this guy down for trying to post useful info.

:plusone:

Hell, he even credited the author and source.
 

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I took the BRC and bought an ER-6n(650). I've found that maneuvering techniques are the same on my 650 as they were for the 250 in the class. So, I guess the first bike I road was a 250, but only for two days. I'm glad I went with a 650 for my first bike, I know I would have outgrown a 250 fairly quick.
 

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Riding any size or type of a motorcycle comes with inherent risks. You can get dead on all of them. Death may come as result of being in over your head in a corner, piling on more speed than you can control... or some ass clown in a cage, too much in a hurry to bother looking out for you, just runs you over. That said, it is easier to recover from mistakes, whether they are yours or the other drivers, on smaller, lighter bikes. This is why smaller machines are recommended to learn on. It makes it easier for the learning rider to work on riding becoming a second nature skill faster instead of being over whelmed by the mass and power of a larger machine. Can we learn on a larger machine? Sure! There is just more balance tipped towards the machine's advantage over you as you are learning. For some, this may come quicker and naturally... for others, your mother may be in tears while the police visit her one summer evening to give her the news about how you kinda sucked at learning to ride a motorcycle. Rather ironically, even the ones that "pick it up fast" or start small and become better over time, getting a larger machine only when sure they are ready, might also find their mother is in tears on that very same porch, on that very same summer evening. Motorcycle riding is serious business, and you best know that each time you ride, no matter what you ride, if nothing else.
 

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Overwhelming Splendidery
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Riding any size or type of a motorcycle comes with inherent risks. You can get dead on all of them. Death may come as result of being in over your head in a corner, piling on more speed than you can control... or some ass clown in a cage, too much in a hurry to bother looking out for you, just runs you over. That said, it is easier to recover from mistakes, whether they are yours or the other drivers, on smaller, lighter bikes. This is why smaller machines are recommended to learn on. It makes it easier for the learning rider to work on riding becoming a second nature skill faster instead of being over whelmed by the mass and power of a larger machine. Can we learn on a larger machine? Sure! There is just more balance tipped towards the machine's advantage over you as you are learning. For some, this may come quicker and naturally... for others, your mother may be in tears while the police visit her one summer evening to give her the news about how you kinda sucked at learning to ride a motorcycle. Rather ironically, even the ones that "pick it up fast" or start small and become better over time, getting a larger machine only when sure they are ready, might also find their mother is in tears on that very same porch, on that very same summer evening. Motorcycle riding is serious business, and you best know that each time you ride, no matter what you ride, if nothing else.
Good post.

Just ride safe and take it very seriously. Many of us unfortunately have some bad stories about riding, and attempting to give CPR to your dead friend is something that is not overly enjoyable anyways.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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Good post.

Just ride safe and take it very seriously. Many of us unfortunately have some bad stories about riding, and attempting to give CPR to your dead friend is something that is not overly enjoyable anyways.
amen
 

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Great post !

I enjoy reading this thread. Has stories of both sides to guide the newbies like me, in order to grow and hopefully live long enough with all limbs attached to play with me future grandkids.
 

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i plan on starting out on a zx6r. i sat on a 250 and it felt too small for me. I do plan on doing the safety course (MSF) and if i have any doubt at all or feel i am not ready then i will go with a 650r, but if i feel comfortable i am going with the zx6r. safety is important to me so i will not be some squid popping wheelies 2 months after i start riding. i do also plan to go all out and get a bunch of safety equipment. i know too many people first hand who learned on a supersport and they have given me guidance. most, if not all of them told me if i feel like show boating at all or am not mature enough, stay away from supersports.

i'm the same way man, my first bike is a 04 636..not that i wanna get all crazy but im 6'5 n im not gonna fit on some 250. its all about ur maturity level and being safe all the time.
 

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Ninja Bike Forum Mod
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i'm the same way man, my first bike is a 04 636..not that i wanna get all crazy but im 6'5 n im not gonna fit on some 250. its all about ur maturity level and being safe all the time.
You'd be surprised. And there's a bunch more to it than just maturity. Experience in motorcycling, just as in any other skill, is most important. Many times more than maturity, I've spoken on this many times and will not change my tune. Experience in bike control is the biggest determining factor, and nothing replaces seat time. There's a reason most, if not all, racers start on 125cc bikes and move to 250cc models, then move up to the supersport class and onward.
 

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Strat - the Asian edition
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You'd be surprised. And there's a bunch more to it than just maturity. Experience in motorcycling, just as in any other skill, is most important. Many times more than maturity, I've spoken on this many times and will not change my tune. Experience in bike control is the biggest determining factor, and nothing replaces seat time. There's a reason most, if not all, racers start on 125cc bikes and move to 250cc models, then move up to the supersport class and onward.
^ what 03black 636 said

not to mention, just because you've turned out okay, doesn't mean others have been lucky enough to survive/not get injured starting out on a 600.
 

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i'm the same way man, my first bike is a 04 636..not that i wanna get all crazy but im 6'5 n im not gonna fit on some 250. its all about ur maturity level and being safe all the time.
It's not all about your maturity, it's about inexperience and having a wider margin of error on a small bike.

You'd be surprised. And there's a bunch more to it than just maturity. Experience in motorcycling, just as in any other skill, is most important. Many times more than maturity, I've spoken on this many times and will not change my tune. Experience in bike control is the biggest determining factor, and nothing replaces seat time. There's a reason most, if not all, racers start on 125cc bikes and move to 250cc models, then move up to the supersport class and onward.
:werd:
 

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Same here

i started on a 08 zzr 600, i got the bike cause of the looks to be honest, so far i have 6k miles on the odometer and yes i had a few close calls but i been reading books and magazines for information and ideas on how to become a better rider for example the two finger grip on the brakes so u can more control of the bike which now have become second nature to me or the use of the back brake in a curve if you are going in to hot and want to decrease speed without upsetting the chassis, proper seating position while in the curves , how to not ride on the blind spots of cage drivers etc etc

i dropped my bike the second day i got it coming out of my driveway bike stalled and down i went resulting in a broken signal light, broken brake bracket a few minor scratches and a huge pain on my ego, after that i did got to fear my bike but with more miles under my belt that fear went away and i started enjoying the rides
now that i look back i should have started on a 250 but i didn't long story short i started on the wrong foot but now motorcycling is part of who i am i expect to get better as the miles roll
take care everybody
I got a zzr600 aswell. Clocked about 11.000 miles on it. I ride it everyday, use as my only form of transportation. I dropped it wile coming to a stop in the parking lot about the secound week I got it. I had the front wheel turned to the left and pressed the brake all the way in, in order to park. It leaned to far to one side and i was too late to catch it. I lol"d at myself, picked it up, and walked into work. Later on, wile riding out in the farm land, I got a bit too excited and lowsided. I was riding for about an hour and a half before I started taking the curves faster, didnt lol at that one but all the same picked up my bike and drove home. I keep the danger out in the middle of no where. That way, if I cause damage, it would only be to myself and no one else, at least direct damage. Im much calmer now-a-days but I could tell you I would have fallen down on my zzr or a 250. They both would have taken me to 65 Mph and I lowsided for taking the turn to fast and just jumping of. I have no problem keeping the gas input smooth(self assessment). That also goes to show you that even if you dont make one mistake, another one can get you. In my case, it was ignoring the 25 mph turn sign and taking it at about 65. Either way, try to walk before you run... some of us learn the hard way and I believe it dosent have to be that way. Listen to the advice experienced riders give you. And if at all possible, try some track days.
 
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