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How should I go about replacing my rims?

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Story to get the picture of what happened: Recently low-sided my 650 on a 270 degree on-ramp after hitting a patch of sand I did not see, mid lean/turn. I tumbled a good bit and got away personally with a little road rash and some fractured bones in my foot after getting my leg stuck under the bike when I started to tumble. My bike's fairings got smashed up, as well as both my wheels sliding into the cement side barrier bending my front and back rim on the left side of the bike. maybe bent up about a half inch to an inch on both wheels.

This is my second motorcycle accident and have never dealt with bending my rims ever. I am wondering if it is possible a shop could straighten the rims out, or if that is just a god awful idea leading to having weak points where they were straightened in the future, or buying a new set of OEM wheels from Kawasaki or if anyone has a set of OEM wheels they could sell me that they aren't using/have swapped out. Just basically asking what my cheapest/safest option is here.

It's such a disappointment walking by my bike every time I open my garage because I just want to get it fixed up for when I'm healed up and want to get this done in the safest and most cost efficient manner. The bike is pearl white, so I am looking for a set of black rims. Any tips to get my baby back to tip top shape would be appreciated.

Also, first post and don't know why I haven't joined this forum earlier as their seems to be an abundance of knowledge on here. Thanks :)
 

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I personally wouldn't have anything to do with a cast aluminum motorcycle wheel that's been straightened.

Your best bet (if on a tight budget) is to buy a used set. Unfortunately, almost all of them are coming off of bikes that have been parted out after being totaled. You never know for sure that what you're ordering is undamaged. You'll need to find someone that you can trust and I would at the very least, require a phone conversation. You'll want a guarantee that they are undamaged.

If not on a tight budget, I'd recommend looking for aftermarket wheels. They are stronger and lighter and you will notice a significant improvement in performance. Removing weight from your wheels is the single biggest performance improvement you can make on a bike. Removing unsprung weight will help your suspension keep the wheels in contact with the road and the reduced rotational mass will reduce the gyroscopic effect (which makes it easier to change the lean angle of the bike). Lighter weight wheels also improve acceleration and reduce braking distance. Unfortunately, they are spendy and there's not a lot of options for your model.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I personally wouldn't have anything to do with a cast aluminum motorcycle wheel that's been straightened.

Your best bet (if on a tight budget) is to buy a used set. Unfortunately, almost all of them are coming off of bikes that have been parted out after being totaled. You never know for sure that what you're ordering is undamaged. You'll need to find someone that you can trust and I would at the very least, require a phone conversation. You'll want a guarantee that they are undamaged.

If not on a tight budget, I'd recommend looking for aftermarket wheels. They are stronger and lighter and you will notice a significant improvement in performance. Removing weight from your wheels is the single biggest performance improvement you can make on a bike. Removing unsprung weight will help your suspension keep the wheels in contact with the road and the reduced rotational mass will reduce the gyroscopic effect (which makes it easier to change the lean angle of the bike). Lighter weight wheels also improve acceleration and reduce braking distance. Unfortunately, they are spendy and there's not a lot of options for your model.
Fair enough. I've seen rims get straightened out and put back on cars, so I was just wondering if the same could be done on motorcycles, but the fact they are die cast aluminum on the ninjas is a good point. It sounded sketchy AF in my head when i thought of it, just wanted to check. That's always my issue with buying new bikes is that the aftermarket takes a while to catch up with that generation of bike. That and Im sure not too many people are swapping rims on their 650. Oh well, its just gonna have to sit in the garage for a while while I use my Duc 797 Monster. the 650 is just so agile and flickable compared to my Monster and such a blast riding canyons which is about 80% of the riding that I do on that bike. The 797 has much longer gearing and I find it a lot more fun to blast through the gears constantly on the 650. Thanks for the reply though. If im not on a tight budget, ( I'm buying another bike this month🙈) Should I look at buying a set of kawi's OEM rims to fix this in the most timely manner?? I haven't checked the price, but im sure it will burn another hole in my pocket lol. Once again thanks for taking the time to respond to this:)
 

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No problem. Personally, I would check Ebay and see if I could find something within a 100 mile driving radius that I could inspect before buying. Otherwise, I'd buy an OEM set. Conversion to another bike is always an option too, but that can involve buying forks/triple clamps, brake parts, etc.
 
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