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Just want to get some tips from you experts. When I take a curve at a good amount of speed I lean the bike over but the bike starts to drift and I end up going wide on the curve. Any tips.
 

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Counter steer is probably one of the best techniques to actively use if your carrying a bit of speed. How much do you weigh? the reason i ask is if your leaning it over with say 150-200 lbs of weight you can probably stay central on the bike and use the counter steering to get you round but in all fairness you want to shift your weight to allow half on half off the side your turning into which then helps lean the bike over easier and stabilise the suspension prior or just into the bend so you dont drift wide due to the suspension settling or not enough weight to show the bike where you want it to go.

There are various techniques you can learn but of them all counter steering (which everyone does naturally) is best, if you actively steer.

Russ
 

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It seems like you're not taking the corners right or standing the bike up too early. As deathace pointed out, countersteering is the way you lean the bike. Try keeping the bike leaned over until you are out of the curve. And please, try it at a slow pace first. As Johnny Dollar suggested, definitely attend an MSF course. Or do parking lot practices. Get together with couple of your friends and apply whatever you see here.
This link is one of the best sources of motorcycling information you will find on the internet:
http://faq.ninja250.org/wiki/I_want_to_improve_my_riding_skills._What_exercises_can_I_do?

And if it does benefit you, go to that websites forum and thank them for the info :) They deserve to be acknowledged.
 

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Lean your body more than ur bike.. and make sure you're on good tire.. that's my .02
 

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When she starts to go wide you're not dropping the throttle are you? That's garanteed to run you wide. Look where you want to exit the turn and get on the throttle. Also crank the ride height by 3/8 of an inch, she'll drop in quicker and have more weigh over the front.
 

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no front brake through the turn...it's a good way to couteract the angle you're approaching
 

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Deathace hit it on the head here and Please dont take offense but it doesnt sound like tou know how to turn a motorcycle and need to learn countersteering.. Leaning in a corner is not steering, its a byproduct of countersteering. Most of us do it unconciously but when you learn how and apply it wow what a better rider you become.study up from the master at this link. Keith code is one of the best at teaching correct tecnique. now if he could teach me spelling lol

http://www.vf750fd.com/blurbs/countercode.html
 

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How to steer a motorcycle

For most motorcyclists, it is the art of cornering that gives them the most pleasure and satisfaction. So it is surprising to realise that not all bikers know how to steer a motorcycle!

When asked: "How do you turn a bike round a bend?" answers can include "I shift my weight to one side of the bike", "I push my arse out", "I lean the bike over", "I turn the handle bars in the direction of the bend".

In fact we all use the same technique whether we realise it or not.

At speeds of greater than say 20 mph / 33 kph it is impossible to turn a bike round a bend without using counter-steering. This means turning the handle bars in the opposite direction of the turn in the bend . For example: in a right hand bend, we turn the bars to the left and in a left hand bend we turn the bars to the right. Most of us started our two wheel careers on bicycles and at low speeds we do indeed turn the handle bars in the direction of the the turn. But at higher speeds this is reversed and we use counter-steering.

At much higher speeds there is an argument for shifting your weight right out and putting your knee to the floor but we are talking of riding on public roads in this article, not on race tracks where weight shifting is more appropriate.

Knowing that it is counter-steering that causes the bike to turn, greatly increases your ability to control the behaviour of the bike in bends.

If you are not familiar with counter-steering then start by being conscious of what is happening to your handle bars while in a turn. Get a better feel by making slight counter-steering adjustments so that you can judge the effect it has on your bike. Start to consciously use counter-steering at the turning point of future bends and your biking career will never look back!
 
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