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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2003 ZR-7S which hesitates when the throttle is barely open. I've read about tinkering with the carburetors to fix this (something I'm not ready to do). I've also read a review of a DVD which advocates using the rear brake and the clutch to control low speed while opening the throttle more. Does this really work better?

Thanks,

PC
 

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Most bikes have a wet multiplate clutch for this exact reason. They are designed to handle slipping. If you want to go very slowly, you can slip, while using the brakes.

I was taught to not use the clutch at all, and just work the brakes and the engine against each other for smoothness, but I dunno....it was ok on a shitty riding course test bike, but not on my baby.

I hate labouring the engine. I give it all the revs it wants. If you can do it safely with the clutch, I'd recommend that, but for gods sake, don't just hold it in completely the whole time.

You need to keep the engine rolling at a fairly significant rate to keep the gyroscopic forces going which keeps the bike upright. The next biggest contributor of these forces, besides the wheels, is the crankshaft. This is how we can keep our bikes upright at very slow speeds.
 

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use the clutch during low speed manuvers...it keeps the driveline tight so you can avoid the jerkiness of on-off throttle positions. generally you should have the clutch engaged enough to get the bike rolling, but not be able to greatly speed up if you give it a lot more throttle (really helpful on tight, right hand turns!)

and you can drag the rear brake a little to tighten up turns as well. also, during slow speed turns counterbalance the bike by shifting your weight to the outside peg (in other words, stay upright while you lean the bike into the turn).

im guessing you havent had a rider course and havent ridden a bike until recently. at least go to youtube and look up some of the Ride Like a Pro videos and practice the techniques he talks about. it really helps, even if you have taken a course but its been a while (like me).
 
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