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ummm you don't want to put race tires on your bike if your not going to be on the track. race tires, at street speeds, will have LESS grip than a street tire because the will not heat up unless your ripping through a canyon. race tires also heat cycle which street tires do not. the rear tire will last you probley 13 heat cycles max then become hard. also, if you ever happen to get stuck in the rain, your screwed.

if you want race tire-esk grip with street ridablity, try the new diablo corsas. i've ridden around jennings with a set on (friends streetbike, not mine) and they did well. they will last longer and out perform a race tire in street situations.
 

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I second that, dont put race tires on unless your going racing, they will wear out very fast compared to normal tires.
Normal sportbike tires like Dunlop 208ZR's, M1's, Pilot Sports, are all plenty grippy on the road, but will last you longer.
I did a track day on my old 207's and had no grip issues, they can do more then I can :)
 

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To add to this answer...

The RS3's are a higher-temp tire than the RS2's, which are for higher-temps than the RS1. Conversely the RS1's are a softer tire than the RS3's and offer better cold-temp grip (shorter wear).

If you aren't racing or doing a whole lotta track days, have you considered Sportec's or ME Z3's, or even the road (non-RS) Rennsports??? Check out the tire tests on www.sportrider.com CLICK HERE or read the tire shootouts Rob Lee has posted in the FAQ of this website... the Metz's do VERY well in road trim...
 

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Originally posted by yellow plates


if you want race tire-esk grip with street ridablity, try the new diablo corsas. i've ridden around jennings with a set on (friends streetbike, not mine) and they did well.
Plain vanilla Diablo is a very good tyre too. Three days at the track with them, no shortage of grip :). The Diablo should be on par with Mez Sportec, Diablo Corsa is little softer and with racier thread pattern. You can't go wrong with any of the above three.
 

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I have a 2000 Honda CBR600F4 and do little riding, mostly low speed in heavy traffic in hot weather, and I've decided on getting a pair of Rennsport tires, "just in case" I'm ever in the situation that I need the extra traction. My question is about the different compounds, RS1, 2 and 3. Just how different, in terms of traction vs tire life, are they? Riding just a few miles a day, how long will the different compounds last?

Any imput would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Erik
 

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Originally posted by dj dunzie

If you aren't racing or doing a whole lotta track days, have you considered Sportec's or ME Z3's, or even the road (non-RS) Rennsports???
The road Rennsport has been discontinued, but you may still be able to find a pair.

Tire wear varies with riding style. A road Rennsport lasts 3,500 miles on the back of my bike. A Sportec M-1 goes off a few hundred miles before that.
 

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Originally posted by yellow plates

ummm you don't want to put race tires on your bike if your not going to be on the track. race tires, at street speeds, will have LESS grip than a street tire because the will not heat up unless your ripping through a canyon. race tires also heat cycle which street tires do not. the rear tire will last you probley 13 heat cycles max then become hard. also, if you ever happen to get stuck in the rain, your screwed.

if you want race tire-esk grip with street ridablity, try the new diablo corsas. i've ridden around jennings with a set on (friends streetbike, not mine) and they did well. they will last longer and out perform a race tire in street situations.
Really? This guy disagrees. Copied from the gixxer forum (oh no, I read that too [:0])
Diablo corsas (supercorsas?), are they pretty much the same as metzeler streetraces? A guy over here bought a race used RS1 for his street/trackday R1 and has done over 4500km with it, and there's still plenty left. He's very smooth and usually 10-20sec off of the fastest street riders depending on the track but it still goes to show you can get some life even out of the softest d.o.t tire.

Oh, and I just have to add, My Metz Rennsport Streetraces have WAY better grip than pilot sports at ANY TEMP, the pilot sport rear stepped out many times from being cold, my metz have never done that. I spun my rear pilot sport (not to mention the macadam 100) many times going for clutch wheelies but I've NEVER spun my metz. I locked up the pilot sport front many times (mostly trying stoppies) but I've (you guessed it) NEVEEERRRR locked up the metz rennsport streetrace front. Same pressures in both, kawi recommended 2,5/2,9 bar street, 2,0/1,9-2,0 bar track.


Anyway, here's someone who seems to, and should, know what he's talking about.


Race tire vs street tire -- an informed opinion!
#141483 - 10/24/01 02:11 PM Edit Reply Quote



Here's a long write-up on tires from Steve Brubaker, the Dunlop distributor for the east coast. Pay particular attention to the paragraph labeled "temperature".
Personally, I take tires right off my race bike and put them on my streetbike. I ride hard, real hard, and hardly ever have grip issues...

------

Here is some text from Steve Brubaker on this very subject. Steve is well known in the racing world, and you've likely seen him in the background shots in the winner circle. Steve is President of Race Tire Service and is Dunlop's representative on the East coast.

> First thing I must mention that I work exclusively with Dunlop product and can only speak about product that I have first hand knowledge and experience with.

> SAFETY. There is not a safety issue in running DOT racing tires on the street. By SAFETY, I mean the tire will not have a failure or come apart from normal aggressive street use. Excluding road hazard. (Falling down on oil, gravel or excessive throttle is not a tire failure)

> DIFFERENCE: The biggest difference in the racing tire and the street tire is in the construction. Street tires have JLB construction and race tires have a Cut Breaker or Cut Belt construction. JLB is when the main tread belt (the ply just underneath the tread rubber) has all of it plies running in the same direction. All the fibres are in the same direction, pointing the way the tire rotates. Cut Breaker construction is when there is 2 belts, both have the plies running at an angle to the rotation.

Take one hand and hold it in front of you, point your finger to the ceiling and keep you fingers side by side. This is what direction the fibres run on a JLB breaker. Now take both hands with the fingers side by side, lay one set of fingers on top of the other set at a 45 degree angle. This is what a Cut Breaker looks like. (a picture is worth 1000 words, wish I had a picture to describe it better).

Whether you understanding the direction of the plies or not, the basic difference in feel and performance is that the JLB construction is very good for stability over bumps and feedback on odd surfaces. It also give a much more smooth ride. This is better for a street ride and over the things that one runs over when riding in street conditions. The Cut Breaker is better at overall side grip. The basic word here is SIDE GRIP. Cut Breakers give much more side grip and a bit of a stiffer ride.

> TEMPERATURES: What does tire temperature have to do with performance? Lets first understand an old falsehood "Race tires won't stick till you warm them up" this is untrue and is a falsehood. Here are the facts. If you took a race tire and a street tire and ran them side by side, the race tire would provide more grip than the street tire in every temperature range. So if both tires are at 60F the race tire works better. If both at 160F, the race tire still works better. Now will a cold race tire work as well as a hot street tire? I don't know, it would depend upon the tires. (But I am sure that someone did this and fell down, then started the rumor. ) The big difference comes in the cold verses hot performance. A race tire get much better when hot. A street tire gets a little bit better when hot.

WARM UP TIME: Dunlops generally come in, in 1 lap (the warm up lap). A street tire gets a little bit better when hot, but not as much as a race tire. The harder one rides the quicker and hotter the tire gets. These are basic datums. The rider has to gain experience with tires and how they work by riding on them many times. There are not hard numbers to describe degrees of traction for every increase in temperature. Experience is the key here.

> Why would you use a RACE TIRE for the STREET? Plus points - More grip. Minus points - Harsher over bumps, less feedback, cost more, tend to wear quicker.

> Why would you use a STREET TIRE for the STREET? Plus points - sufficient grip, smooth ride, more stable over bumps, last longer, cost less. Minus points - Don't look as cool as my friend with race tires.

> If you are riding on the street and really need a race tire, you should not be riding on the street. Street tires give very good grip, enough to have a very fun time in the canyons. A street tire on the track will run about 1.5 seconds slower than a race tire. Compared to 15 seconds slower for the average street rider that goes to the track, it is easy to see that experience and practice makes a much bigger difference than just tire choice.

> Ride and have fun.
 

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What about the rain??? I could see the case being argued (for those that could afford to) but the rain has to be considered. Even if you only plan to ride in the sun, what about those times when you get cought in an unexpected downpour? Putt-putt home or wait it out???
 

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Originally posted by Grunt_99

What about the rain??? I could see the case being argued (for those that could afford to) but the rain has to be considered. Even if you only plan to ride in the sun, what about those times when you get cought in an unexpected downpour? Putt-putt home or wait it out???
As usual, bang on the money Grunt. 3 of my last 4 rides have ended in rides in near-terrential downpour, and THAT'S where I wouldn't want to be caught out in track-spec tires. The second reason is that generally street riding is more upright, causing your tire to flat-wear more. It's amplified with a softer race tire. Not pretty. And let's face it, there are some DAMN good sport-bias tires that last ok and offer fantastic grip for the street for less money. There's a happy medium between full race soft and hard street bias tires, and those sport tires are all pretty good these days.
 

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I should probably mention that most guys here have ten or twenty times the experience I have, and we seldom get the 'terrential downpours' but rather we get less harsh rains then what I've experienced in Canada or in the USA. Unfortunately, we get bad weather more often.

If the road is wet and/or it's raining, I've not had any problems, street or track. I also try to do 1-3 track days a week (or track evenings, maybe 3X 20min /weekday or 8X 20min weekends), so the tires get worn pretty even. I guess I'm becoming more of a track addict and that makes me biased towards grippier tires. Street riding is not as important anymore. And since I f:ed up and crashed the last time I went hard in the twisties, I'm bettin I won't be doing that for a while either.

02kawi6R, a n00bs advice (meaning my advice should be of less value than that of those with way more experience), If you get into trouble in traffic, the difference in traction is probably not going to be the factor which decides the outcome. Like the Dunlop guy said, 1.5 second difference on the track between sport and race tires is insignificant when compared to rider skill. And there are many riders who pass me on less grippier tires, but I feel more at ease with softer tires and I'm not switching to a harder compound anymore.

I just can't shut up, can I. And I have the streetrace version of the metz, harder then RS3, and I cant recommend them enough.

From metzelers faq: http://www.metzelermoto.com/product_info/faq/index.asp

"May I run racing tires on the street?
No. We offer Rennsport tires in street compound. This will be the best choice for grip, performance and mileage"

Whatever that means.

Am I confusing yet?

Maybe I should shut the hell up now, before I take up all the space on this board promoting the tire I happened to choose. Metz should pay me or give me free tires[:p], too bad they won't[V]

If you only do traffic/street riding, sport tires are probably a better all-round choice. My point was simply that race tires (or semi- race) are not crap on the street, I'm just a little long winded sometimes:D
 

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Hmm... I would say that even the road version of the Rennsport (Rennsport streetrace) is a lot slippier in street use, than a typical sportbike tyre. Michelin Pilot Sport slides pretty easily when cold but not as easily as the Rennsport. I switched to Rensports from Bridgestone BT010:s and I have to say that the BT010:s offered much more grip on the twisties and highway ramps than the Rensports, especially in cold weather.

Ofcourse the Rensports were grippier on a track but even in there they they need 1 or 2 warm up laps to grip better than a good road tyre.

Buying any race tyre for highway use is simply a waste of money.
 

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What!
Funny, I've had the exact opposite experience!
Slippier than pilot sports!!!wtf! Not my pilot sports, anyway. Maybe I had a crap set on my bike? Don't think so though. The rennsports have been far, and I really mean far superior in all aspects but thread life, of which I can't speak yet, since I've only ridden maybe 3500km street (maybe 200 wheelies/20 mini-stoppies[:I]) / 1500km track on them. Seems to be lots left though, at least at the center[:p].

And all tires need to be warmed up for a lap or two on the track, including road tires, since you'll be running much lower pressures. Plus you'll get *more* miles/kilometers out of the rennsports at the track then you will with 010's, others have tested that.
 

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The Rennsport road tire gives more grip than the Pilot Sport at any temperature and on any surface, except perhaps in the wet. Many tire reviews put the Rennsport road tire against the Pilot Race H2, and the Sportec M-1 against the Pilot Sport.

The Rennsport road tire is not a race tire. It is a good choice if you ride often on the track, but also on the road.
 
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