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Here's how I make sense out of all this, but keep in mind that I'm no expert. That's probably why I have to use all these sentences to explain.
Lowering the front puts more weight on the front tire, increases the rake and decreases the trail, causing the bike to turn into corners faster. Raising the rear does the same, but due to geometry it affects the front less than lowering the front does. Raising the rear increases the swing arm angle, resisting the bike's tendency to squat when under power and allows the bike to hold a tighter line when exiting the corner. Squatting takes weight off the front, causes the rake to decrease and the trail increase and makes the bike run wide when exiting.

If the bike squats too much when powering out of turns, the increased ability to steer by lowering the front will be mostly negated. And, lowering the front isn't going to substantially affect the swing arm angle to do much with regard to squat. Simply put, lowering the front effects the rear and the raising rear effects the front, but the effects are not close to being equal.

I like the way Max from Traxxion Dynamics explains this, he says that if lowering the front affects steering into a corner by a factor of 5, raising the rear the same amount affects steering by a factor of 1.


Gary M
www.bmgracing.com
CCS SW AM #28
'03 Kawi ZX636R
'00 Duc 748R
 

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A guy emailed me saying that moving the clamps down on the forks a bit would have the same effect as increasing the ride height adjustment on the rear (without actually increasing the total height of the bike)?

Any thoughts on this?

The original thread is here:
topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4966




 

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Thanks, good info.

The thing that worries me about that is that they say raising the ride height too much makes the front end twitchy, so 8mm is about as far as you should go. If you lower the front, then wouldn't it be VERY twitchy?


 

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Hi, J1Aussie,

If I recall those settings correctly, it recommended simply raising the rear without dropping the forks thru the yokes. Performance Bikes sees the ZX-6R as already riding a bit low.

If you've raised your rear by 8mm already (which I recall seeing in another post), yes, you're correct, lowering the forks thru the yokes will effectively make that 8mm higher.

You may not want to do that, because I raised my rear by 11mm and while it hasn't turned twitchy, there is some wheel flop (the front turns in a little quicker when steering). I haven't been able to dial it out thru the front suspension settings. I have no problems when countersteering tho, I just lean leading with my shoulder and the bike is leaned over into the turn with hardly any effort.

I'll probably reduce ride height to the recommended +8mm -- but that can wait for when rainy season starts over here [^]
 

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Dropping the front forks down the triple tee will make turn-in more easy, BUT you will lose high speed stability.

Of course, it friggin' helps prevent wheelies, good for drag racing, BAD for stunnaz.

'00 ZX6R silver
 
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