Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
You can adjust the clutch lever using the barrel adjuster located where the clutch cable enters the lever. Loosen the locking wheel and turn the barrel. Can't remember which way to turn it to bring it closer, but there are only two choices so it won't be too hard to figure it out.

If you need more adjustment you can go to the adjuster at the other end of the cable. Just don't adjust too much since this can also affect the point where the clutch engages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,621 Posts
thanks kelly - i knew i had seen a post of yours somewhere with picture....
will adjusting it actually move the bar in a little bit, or will it just move the part where it engages closer?
I think the problem that I'm having is just that it's such a far reach for my little hands...
kat,

with the adjuster, you are affecting the static slack amount at the lever. the owner's manual gives you a measurement on what that small distance should be, but you can actually loosen it up more than the figure they give. By loosening it, you are bringing the engagement point of the clutch closer to the bars.

The main thing to watch for is that you don't want to loosen it too much. How much is too much? You want the the clutch to be fully disengage when you pull the lever in to put the bike into gear. If it lurches or clunks and tries to move forward, the clutch isn't fully disengaged and you will need to adjust some slack out of the lever. Does that make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Kat - thanks for the great description of your first ride. I'm sure I won't be the only one waiting to get a bike that will be living through the very graphic pictures you paint. Love your description of getting started on the hill at the house. Have fun and keep us up to date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Then it got really fun because I had to try and take off going uphill on a hill we have trouble in the car if we are stopped.... ugh! So yeah, took until about the 5th try to give her enough throttle while letting out the clutch to make it the rest of the way up the hill...
:) I was teaching this to my wife the other day, she was having trouble in our driveway.

1- use two fingers to apply the front brake.
2- using your two smaller fingers & thumb, give it a little gas(raise rpm a little).
3- Let out clutch slowly until motor drags rpm down some.
4- Let off front brake & use clutch to hold your position on hill.
5- Give it more gas while letting more clutch out to go up hill.

Took the wife two try's, then she was rocking the bike on the hill with the clutch & one big :)

Sent ya a pm on the clutch lever;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Glad to here you are lovin it... You will never be the same :) Keep practicing on the hills, they can be tricky... but when after a few, you'll get it. My wife found a nice hill in the neighborhood that was steep... Practiced on it for for the stop and goes.. She said it helped alot... Keep up the good work and be safe... Practice, practice, practice... :Bike: it only gets funner!!!!!:D

HK~Good advice on "How To".. Same thing I told my wife and it worked great for her too... REP TO YOU!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I don't want to throw too much cold water on this discussion, but the adjuster on the clutch lever is for adjusting the freeplay in the cable, not the position of the lever. My experience is that it's impossible to shift these bikes smoothly unless the free play is almost zero (something like the manufacturers spec.). To adjust the lever position, you need an after market lever like this one:



I'm not sure if there is one available to fit the 250R, but this is the right solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
make sure to set your clutch play per the manual, anything other than what they spec can lead to problems.
Thank you hoser, I was beginning to think that I was the only one here who has actually shifted one of these things. I learned through long experience with my old 2001 250R (and my Gpz305 before) that the clutch lever free play had to be within factory range (2-3 mm) for smooth shifts to be possible. And you need to let the lever fully forward between shifts to be sure that the clutch is completely engaged. If not, you will be holding the lever close to the friction point to avoid sloppy shifts, an open invitation to slipping clutch. Maybe an experienced rider can do this effectively, but to expect a noob to get it right is asking too much. The high range adjustment of 3 mm is just under 1/8", by the way.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Thanks for the details on the first ride. It's nice that you got out and really took an enjoyable route from what it appears. My first ride was in bumper to bumper traffic thanks to construction and an accident...not the best decision on my part, but hey, not my fault I got my endorsement at 4pm on a Friday, lol.

The hills suck at first, but like some have said once you get down your own technique (or someone else's for that matter), they are real easy and you won't even have to think about them. I had a really tough time with a hill in my area for about 4 days, and I just kept going back and back until I got it. You're lucky because your "nemesis" is just down the street, so you can go pound it out 'til ya get it whenever you have a free couple minutes. :)

Keep enjoying and riding safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
entropykat,

When I first got my 08 250r, I rode it a lot in a short time. I remember having some significant hand soreness in my left hand from operating the clutch(I guess I had weak left hand strength?).

Anyway, I didn't have any hand soreness issues after a few hundred miles of riding, as my muscles strengthened and I got used to it. You mentioned it was specifically your thumb, but still some food for thought, before you buy something new.

I forgot.... congrats on the bike and your first ride!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,247 Posts
You go, Kat! I'm havin' as much fun reading about your exploits as you are doin' 'em! Time to think about shimmimg those carbs. As you've probably experienced by now, the throttle response on the 250R is abominable. Oh, and since you ended up with a black one (which is awesome looking by the way), has the gas tank started "beeping" yet? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Thank you hoser, I was beginning to think that I was the only one here who has actually shifted one of these things. I learned through long experience with my old 2001 250R (and my Gpz305 before) that the clutch lever free play had to be within factory range (2-3 mm) for smooth shifts to be possible. And you need to let the lever fully forward between shifts to be sure that the clutch is completely engaged. If not, you will be holding the lever close to the friction point to avoid sloppy shifts, an open invitation to slipping clutch. Maybe an experienced rider can do this effectively, but to expect a noob to get it right is asking too much. The high range adjustment of 3 mm is just under 1/8", by the way.

Chris
:Laughing rolling:
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top