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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:mad:Nail in my rear tire:mad:

Was riding home head some clanking from the rear stopped to check it out and there was a nail in my tire... I had it plugged... it is not in the middle so im not running over it repeatedly.. but im worried about the tire seperating on me in time and leavin me stranded or worse...

I just wondered what tires do you guys suggest as a better replacement of the rear stock tire?....

I wanted to go with a 150 series, but ive read a lot of mixed reviews about how its not safe... what do you guys suggest
 

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I've heard pros and cons of using plugged tires on bikes. From what I've gathered, I'd be prone to just use the tire until it needs replacement due to tread wear. But... on second thought, exactly where is the puncture?? if close to the sidewall, that might be a problem. If on the tread, I'd roll with it.

Cars run with plugged tires all the time. Last bit of advice is the plug is only as good as the person who installed it . Where did you have it done and do you have confidence their work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I took it too your basic tire shop... nothing special... I watched him do it.. He done a good job on the plug.. I feel confident it isn't going anywhere.. but it is close to the side wall but still in the tread... I am a little reluctant to lean as hard on that side just to be careful..
 

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Use a patch plug, not a regular plug that you have for cars. Patch plug has a patch that covers the inside of the hole and also plugs. You push it in then pull it back out until the patch touches.. but only if its on the tread. Dont ever do it if its on the sidewall, even in a car... =blowout
 

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1. Drill out hole

2. Power buff area around hole evenly careful not to buff down to the steel

3. Apply patch cement

4. Pull plug-patch through and use 'pizza roller' to make sure the plug is seated properly

5. Remove thin plastic sheet on plug-patch and pizza roll again

6. Apply a liberal amount of black sealant to and areas surrounding the patch

Any tire shop that knows what they're doing would do just that. I worked in a few tire shops so I know that's how it should be done.
 

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I have never ridden a motorcycle on the street but I used to work for a small shop who the owner/manager rode all the time and he would always tell people to replace tires after a puncture because unlike cars you only have two tires and if one blows out on the freeway you were screwed. The logic made sense to me and it did to all the customers we had. He also might have been trying to sell another tire, I don't know but I would at least consider the possibility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nobody is answering the OP's question! He knows to get the tire replaced, hes asking what kind of tire he should get, not how to plug it haha!!!
Thank you brian lol.. I totally agree... I don't care if the tire was plugged or patched well.. or whatever... even on a job well done there is that 1 in a million chance that I will get a flat or wreck it......

I intend on getting a new rear tire, but I really need a good suggestion.... cause honestly I think the stock tires sux anyway...

in my opinion the tires have too much sidewall flex and fell unstable at hi speed cornering... there is something about it that just doesn't feel smooth like I know it should...

I want to go with a wider tire but.... I don't want something that is going to decrease performance... so I will stay with the smaller 130 if need be..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well.. I only ride on the street.. I would like to get into going to the tracks... but don't really know of any near me.......

I usually run around 60 to 70... depending on what road I go down (avoiding speeding tickets)...

I get on the interstate every now and then but not much...

I mostly ride hilly, curvy winding back roads....

although the highway is quicker... gets boring...

I dunno.. I guess depending on if it is worth it or not I may be willing to spend up to 300.00 on a rear tire..

I guess what im looking for is a good multi use tire, that will last some time on the street... but is good enough to run at a track....
 

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1. Drill out hole

2. Power buff area around hole evenly careful not to buff down to the steel

3. Apply patch cement

4. Pull plug-patch through and use 'pizza roller' to make sure the plug is seated properly

5. Remove thin plastic sheet on plug-patch and pizza roll again

6. Apply a liberal amount of black sealant to and areas surrounding the patch

Any tire shop that knows what they're doing would do just that. I worked in a few tire shops so I know that's how it should be done.
exactly!
a PROPERLY(key word) repaired tire is AS good as new.
well.. I only ride on the street.. I would like to get into going to the tracks... but don't really know of any near me.......

I usually run around 60 to 70... depending on what road I go down (avoiding speeding tickets)...

I get on the interstate every now and then but not much...

I mostly ride hilly, curvy winding back roads....

although the highway is quicker... gets boring...

I dunno.. I guess depending on if it is worth it or not I may be willing to spend up to 300.00 on a rear tire..

I guess what im looking for is a good multi use tire, that will last some time on the street... but is good enough to run at a track....
ah hell man, ANY after market is going to be better than stock.
and for $300, you can get the set, and should have money leftover!
 

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I'm not a fan of sticking a bigger tire on the back, but I'm thinking of going with a set of these next as I feel the advantages will outweigh the downsides...

http://www.kawiforums.com/showthread.php?t=118441&highlight=tires

if you do, you might want to check about mixing bias ply fronts with a radial in the rear. I'd be more inclined to swap out both tires, which is why I was suggesting plugging what you had until they wore out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well.. I may be a lil vain.. but I can't be having mix matched tires lol... so I was gonna go ahead and get a set to match.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
yah... I didn't think it would be a good idea.. to just replace one tire... unless I was going with the same one... but of course if im spending money I might as well get something more worth my money.....

I like the wider tire.. on the rear as far as looks... but how much added weight is that....?... I see they guys are getting good numbers at the track they run... but that is more rotating mass.. but ive also heard that the new radials weigh less than the bias ply
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
what about a 120/60 for the front?...

Just curious but wouldn't that drop the rear... lower than the front with the 60 series?
 

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One problem there: The speedo is on the front tire. So if you lower the height of the front tire your speedometer correction is going to go from 7-10% to somewhere around 1,545,334% (I might have put a decimal in the wrong spot).
 
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