Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I finally after 3 days of hell, got my chain installed on my bike now. I did adjust the tensioners and the needle marks are both at the 5th mark. I tried getting the slack tightened, I saw videos on youtube but If I keep it at the 4th mark it seems too loose, 5th is kinda in the middle, and anything further seems way too tight. A guy at cycle gear said it should be 2 fingers length but idk.. Also, i bought one of thoes motion pro chain alignment tools, how exactly does this work? I put it on the rear sprocket and im not sure exactly how to tell if the wheel is even....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,000 Posts
I go by quarter turns for the chain adjustment bolts, after starting at the same adjustment lines for both sides of the swingarm. It almost always ends up somewhere between lines.

I like an inch and a half of chain slack, when pushing up on the bottom center of the chain, with the back tire on the pavement and the bike held up with the kickstand.

I am not sure how to use the alignment tool that you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
The axle marks get you close but to make sure the axle and and rear sprocket are straight with the driveline you clamp the tool on the sprocket and align it with the chain. It doesn't take much to have the sprocket out of line so the tool just gives you that confirmation that everything is in line.
Chain tension can be tricky depending on how much pressure you use. I just get it set in the middle of the limits they set in the manual.
 

·
The Indifference Engine
Joined
·
6,150 Posts
They don't have to "line up" with the marks. They just have to be even between them so if correct slack is 1/16 of an inch behind mark four on one side, line up the other and check again.

Correct slack is about 1 inch of movement up and down measured on the lower run of the chain, mid way between the two sprockets and only light finger pressure should be used to move it.

After you've adjusted it, sit on the bike in full gear and have some one check. You need to have at least 1/4" of slack on the chain after you've compressed the suspension (off the kickstand, no feet down).

Easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
ok yeah i did all that, i seem to have an inch or so more of slack in the chain when its down, and i used that tool and everything pointed straight so it should be right. thanks everybody!
 

·
That Fighter Guy
Joined
·
15,175 Posts
I go by quarter turns for the chain adjustment bolts, after starting at the same adjustment lines for both sides of the swingarm. It almost always ends up somewhere between lines.

I like an inch and a half of chain slack, when pushing up on the bottom center of the chain, with the back tire on the pavement and the bike held up with the kickstand.

I am not sure how to use the alignment tool that you have.
That's right, 1.5" of total chain travel. I prefer to have the rear up on a stand though. It works the same as having the tire on the pavement, but it's upright making it easier to see and adjust. I've always gone by the marks on the swing arm without issues over the past 70,000 miles of chain driven motorcycling. I use a clear plastic 6" ruler I bought from Office Depot to make sure I get that 1 - 1.5" of total chain travel.

The tool you mentioned is attached to the rear sprocket on the chain. You basically look and make sure the rod stays parallel to the chain to ensure proper alignment. Hopefully that makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Here is the procedure for checking your chain slack (from the user manual for that year model):

1. Set the motorcycle on it's center stand.

2. Rotate the rear wheel to find the position where the chain is tightest, and measure the maximum chain slack by pulling up and pushing down the chain midway between the engine sprocket and rear wheel sprocket.


A. 35 ~ 40 mm (1.4 ~ 1.6 in.).


Also, when you actually adjust the chain remember to first loosen the Torque Link Nut:



 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
ok yeah i did all that, i seem to have an inch or so more of slack in the chain when its down, and i used that tool and everything pointed straight so it should be right. thanks everybody!
good deal.
I use that alignment tool on all my bikes. Takes the guess work out of the little lines and whether they're right or not.
For 8 bucks it's a great tool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
thanks everybody, i got it aligned after a few times and the chain is on with little slack. It was a pain though getting everything right. But practice makes perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
When I changed out my back tire, I aligned by putting the bike on center stand and getting the wheel spinning at a good clip. I had just had a new tire put on so it was nice and even. It seemed to me that it was much easier to eyeball with the wheel spinning.

I haven't had any uneven where in the ~700 miles it's been since then, so I think my method worked.
 

·
That Fighter Guy
Joined
·
15,175 Posts
When I changed out my back tire, I aligned by putting the bike on center stand and getting the wheel spinning at a good clip. I had just had a new tire put on so it was nice and even. It seemed to me that it was much easier to eyeball with the wheel spinning.

I haven't had any uneven where in the ~700 miles it's been since then, so I think my method worked.
700 miles? Lol. If you had uneven wear, do you know where to look? The point of the tool is so you don't have to eyeball it. Eyeball is a universal way of saying "guess". I've always used the marks without problems, but I'm tempted to buy the $8 tool to see how straight it really is. Considering how much life I've gotten out of my chains and sprockets over the years, it may be $8 unnecessarily spent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
700 miles? Lol. If you had uneven wear, do you know where to look? The point of the tool is so you don't have to eyeball it. Eyeball is a universal way of saying "guess". I've always used the marks without problems, but I'm tempted to buy the $8 tool to see how straight it really is. Considering how much life I've gotten out of my chains and sprockets over the years, it may be $8 unnecessarily spent.
Ya I'm a sucker for gadgets. it just verifies the alignment marks are correct. The marks are good and I doubt the tool would save anyone money over the lifetime of a chain, just good to know it's all in line.
Portable Tool for Motorcycle Dirtbike motorbike Chain Scooter Alignment Tune ATV | eBay
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top