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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is no way I am going to make it to my next scheduled service (7.5K I think) before I need to replace my front brake pads. Well, I guess that doesn't matter anyways since I would prefer to do it myself and save some $$$$.

I could just order OEM pads in anticipation of the upcoming weekend project, but was wondering if aftermarket would be best?
Is a motorcycle brake job just like doing a car, or is there something unique I would need to know?
I am assuming this is the best timing to install braided brake cables (thus technichally voiding my $400 warentee - live and learn)?
Should front and back be done at the same time (obviously rear has more life)? Should it be safe to reuse the rotor?
 

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There is no way I am going to make it to my next scheduled service (7.5K I think) before I need to replace my front brake pads. Well, I guess that doesn't matter anyways since I would prefer to do it myself and save some $$$$.

I could just order OEM pads in anticipation of the upcoming weekend project, but was wondering if aftermarket would be best?
Is a motorcycle brake job just like doing a car, or is there something unique I would need to know?
I am assuming this is the best timing to install braided brake cables (thus technichally voiding my $400 warentee - live and learn)?
Should front and back be done at the same time (obviously rear has more life)? Should it be safe to reuse the rotor?
what makes you think you need brake pads? if the stock pads work well for you now, stick with them, unless they have some shortcoming you are trying to overcome. I'd stay away from braided lines for now, unless there is something you don't like about the brakes presently. properly bleeding a brake system which has ingested a lot of air is something best left to someone with a lot of experience. MC brake calipers can be a bitch to properly bleed without the proper tools.

pads need replacing when they have a minimum amount of pad material left. you need to measure the pad to see where you are.

best you order up service manual if you feel you'll be working on the bike. it will show you step by step the proper way to work on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a little over 4500 miles, but the front pads are looking really worn. I believe they technically are good until 1mm of shoe, but I wanted to order it now and have it on hand. It is my daily commuter, so I didn't want to have it sitting in the garage waiting for parts.
 

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I have a little over 4500 miles, but the front pads are looking really worn. I believe they technically are good until 1mm of shoe, but I wanted to order it now and have it on hand. It is my daily commuter, so I didn't want to have it sitting in the garage waiting for parts.
I would recommend a set of OEM front brake pads. The front will wear faster than the rear brakes, so you should be fine on the rear pads for now.

Unless you are having issues with your brakes, stay with the same type of pads you have now.

Rotors can be reused.

Instead of changing lines, try flushing out the old fluid with some fresh hi performance fluid.

And, if you intend to do the work, buy a service manual.
 

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MC brake calipers can be a bitch to properly bleed without the proper tools.
it really only takes 1 open end wrench and a screwdriver to bleed the brakes. i've done it a few times because i keep changing things on my bike. if you feel that the brake fade is getting to you, then SS brake lines might be the way to go. i didn't realize how bad the rubber lines were until i put on my galfer lines. of course, its not a necessary mod, but you will notice a difference.
 

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theres NO way you need brakes already. not even close.
if you DO, there is a problem somewhere.

i upgraded my calipers at about 23,000, and when i pulled my pads, there were about 50% still.
if yours are going to be worn by 7,500 than theres a problem with the brakes.
 

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Why are you feeling like they need to be changed?

Are they spongy? Do they seem soft? Have you checked the level?

If they're spongy bleed them. If they're soft or fading flush them. If the level is low top it up then ride it. I agree with BC if they're going away already after 4500miles you're not using them properly or there's something wrong like Nevada said. Do you downshift? What level of riding experience do you have?

Until you're more experienced stick with stock parts. Order them to have them but I'd be willing to bet they don't need to be replaced yet. Braided lines aren't for the novice rider. Grab too much brake and you'll see why stunters swear by them lol.

Habs
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I haven't been riding long, so 4500 (closer to 4800) is the sum of my riding experience. I got the bike in June. I do use engine braking, and am probably using it more effectively now than I did when I started, as I come off a freeway offramp and can virtually not even touch my brake sometimes before entering the turn onto the city street. I do have a tendency to ride "spirited," but not obnoxious, on the city streets. Now that I am thinking about it, I probably did use a lot more brake at first, since I had to learn the hard way not to lock up my wheel.... granted this was the rear wheel, but probably a systemic symptom of poor braking technique. So, this may have played a partial role in early pad wear.

The reason I am thinking about replacing pads is because they are physically worn (visual inspection). I am also noticing I have to squeeze a little more as the caliper must travel farther as the pad wears - I presume anyways.
When I have done my auto brakes in the past I have never bleed them, so I am curious why it is being suggested.... are you suspecting air in the lines? What is different about "high performance" fluid (never heard of it). Since fluid isn't compressible, I thought it would function the same (I think I just announced myself as a newbie) ;)

The reason I was thinking about braided lines is just because of what I had read about them being a good (cheap) upgrade.... probably being a lemming I confess, but improved feedback sounded good. However, I appreciated the warning about doing that too soon... I didn't consider that. I remember when I went from cable operated rim brakes on my mountain bike to hydraulic (Magura) rim brakes - big difference in feel and power, so I hear you on that and will head your advise for now. It is my [non-expert] opinion that the 250r seems a little underpowered on the front brake for the "spirited" rider, although adequate. It would be nice to have a dual rotor on the front, but I understand this wouldn't vibe with the intended market and price point. (sorry I am drifting from the point)

EDIT: As far as the service manual. I do have a copy of the 1988 supplemental manual that is on the net. My 250r is a 2008 model, so clearly there are some differences. Although I definitely plan to get the proper manual at some point, will this suffice for brake jobs?
 

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Powerhungry
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I haven't been riding long, so 4500 (closer to 4800) is the sum of my riding experience. I got the bike in June. I do use engine braking, and am probably using it more effectively now than I did when I started, as I come off a freeway offramp and can virtually not even touch my brake sometimes before entering the turn onto the city street. I do have a tendency to ride "spirited," but not obnoxious, on the city streets. Now that I am thinking about it, I probably did use a lot more brake at first, since I had to learn the hard way not to lock up my wheel.... granted this was the rear wheel, but probably a systemic symptom of poor braking technique. So, this may have played a partial role in early pad wear.

The reason I am thinking about replacing pads is because they are physically worn (visual inspection). I am also noticing I have to squeeze a little more as the caliper must travel farther as the pad wears - I presume anyways.
When I have done my auto brakes in the past I have never bleed them, so I am curious why it is being suggested.... are you suspecting air in the lines? What is different about "high performance" fluid (never heard of it). Since fluid isn't compressible, I thought it would function the same (I think I just announced myself as a newbie) ;)

The reason I was thinking about braided lines is just because of what I had read about them being a good (cheap) upgrade.... probably being a lemming I confess, but improved feedback sounded good. However, I appreciated the warning about doing that too soon... I didn't consider that. I remember when I went from cable operated rim brakes on my mountain bike to hydraulic (Magura) rim brakes - big difference in feel and power, so I hear you on that and will head your advise for now. It is my [non-expert] opinion that the 250r seems a little underpowered on the front brake for the "spirited" rider, although adequate. It would be nice to have a dual rotor on the front, but I understand this wouldn't vibe with the intended market and price point. (sorry I am drifting from the point)
EDIT: As far as the service manual. I do have a copy of the 1988 supplemental manual that is on the net. My 250r is a 2008 model, so clearly there are some differences. Although I definitely plan to get the proper manual at some point, will this suffice for brake jobs?
how thin are the pads? theyre not THICK when new.

also, yes brake fluid doesnt compress. but over time, it breaks down, heat from heavy braking accelerates this.
also, its hygroscopic. it absorbs moisture(from the air). it will then start to require a bit more travel before they get solid. the pads remain in contact(lightly) with the rotor(if everything is working properly) regardless of how much pad is remaining.

cars hold much more fluid than bikes do. so this process of breaking down the fluid, takes longer, and youve got 4 wheels/brakes to rely on. so brakes on the bike are VERY important.\
its not so much BLLEDING the brakes, as it is FLUSHING the fluid. most likely flushing the fluid will improve the lever feel.

SS lines can help some too. as the OE rubber line can flex/swell with pressure. this is also exaggerated when they get HOT. from heavy braking, or ambient temps.



yeh, that manual should work fine. its pretty basic stuff.
 
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